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Infographic: Burbs Going Bust

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Infographic: Burbs Going Bust

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  • #91645
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster
    #495368

    NerosNeptune
    Participant

    I feel like these infographic things are kind of patronizing. Here, we don’t think you’ll be able to follow this if we just write it, so we need to put it in flashy colors and make it look like a Ford F-150 commercial. And the ability to put in certain graphics and fonts for certain things allows for a complete loss of objectivity.

    Also, from the first chart, exurbs are still growing at a faster rate than urban/dense suburbs. Our fastest growing areas here are exurbs.

    #495369

    bman
    Participant

    Pity the poor suburbs … honestly, I don’t see the suburbs or exurbs decaying and rotting so party on!!!!

    #495370

    bucki12
    Member

    Is the generation Y thing more just a cycle for that 15-32 age demographic? My parents first house was closer to the city as they needed a smaller, more affordable home that was close to things like grocery stores and laundry mats. They only had one car and I assume they still occasionally went out. There are plenty of 80’s pictures of them on bicycles in urban areas. As they got older and had more kids they moved further out and biked less (probably because they had us kids to haul around).

    I don’t plan on living in Hilliard, but I do not think my parents did either.

    #495371

    columbusmike
    Participant

    On average, people are spending $191 a month in just gasoline! Figure in a car payment and car insurance and you’re probably talking $400+ a month in automobile ownership. That’s a good chunk of your paycheck, unless you’re Mitt Romney. Why don’t we need public transit again?

    #495372

    gramarye
    Participant

    I agree that the 18-34 demographic will probably move farther out into the suburbs, as a general rule, when they enter the 35-44 demographic themselves. However, I would tend to guess that they will be more spread out compared to themselves as 18-34-year olds, not necessarily as compared to the previous generation of the 35-44 demographic.

    The trend there that I would predict to be the most durable as Gen Y ages is the substitution of social networking for driving in many instances. For one thing, that technology will continue to mature even as Gen Y does. For another, it’s basically become habit for a lot of young people today, and habits don’t often change with age, or they’d be unworthy of the name. I don’t necessarily think that urban living has become a lifelong habit for too many people, because you have to do a lot more thinking about where you choose to put down roots than you do about who you’re going to contact on Facebook. By definition, when you have to think about it, it’s not a habit.

    #495373

    columbusmike
    Participant

    The price of gasoline will probably have more to do with the expansion of the suburbs more than GenY, trends, technology, etc. When gas reaches $8 bucks a gallon, suburban living will just plain cost more.

    #495374

    cheap
    Member

    columbusmike said:
    When gas reaches $8 bucks a gallon, suburban living will just plain cost more.

    not if you live 2 miles from your job,which a lot of people living in the burbs do.

    you keep repeating that $8 a gallon BS,and it’s not happening.

    btw,every apt being built downtown comes with at least 1 more car down there.

    enjoy the density,and exhaust fumes.

    #495375

    columbusmike
    Participant

    Wait, do you have proof gas is not going to increase? Do you know where this unlimited supply of gasoline is located?

    #495376

    cheap
    Member

    columbusmike said:
    Wait, do you have proof gas is not going to increase? ?

    ok,i think gas will be $1 a gallon

    let’s just all get absurd.

    #495377

    ricospaz
    Participant

    This seems to be a load of crap. There are plenty of houses still being built in the suburbs. Sometimes I think you downtowners need to take a stroll in old Westerville, Old Worthington, Old Dublin, hell even old Hilliard. Those housing developments are usually within a mile or two of these old downtown areas. A lot of these people work in the suburbs (I did for years) and think that living downtown would be great if you don’t want a lawn or kids.

    #495378

    NerosNeptune
    Participant

    Why is it not possible to raise children downtown? Seems like there’s a lot for them to do, as I see a lot of people brining their kids downtown.

    Cheap, is $8/gallon gas really that absurd? The gas tax is going to have to go up eventually to pay for fixing the crumbling outdated roads, even if oil prices don’t skyrocket. And it wasn’t *that* long ago that gas cost half what it does today, so is it that crazy to think it won’t double again in the next 10 years?

    #495379

    mrsgeedeck
    Participant

    I think its not just the cost of driving that influences this demographic, but general trends in family dynamics. @bucki12 mentions that as the size of his parents family increased they moved further out…from what I’ve read in the past people are getting married later in life and often having smaller families than previous generations.
    At 31, I’ve been married for 3 years and children are no where on the horizon. Combine that with the fact that my husband and I both work full time and have plenty of outside hobbies and interests, the idea of taking care of a massive lawn or cleaning some 3000 sq. foot MI home isn’t really that appealing.

    I would also point out that @cheap’s comment regarding people in the burbs living 2 minutes from work can (and often does) apply to city dwellers as well. A good number of close friends, as well as my husband and I, are within walking/biking distance to work, and living in the city as opposed to the ‘burbs, we’ve got the sidewalk infrastructure to make this feasible.

    @ricospaz Our house in IV is within walking distance to three maybe four playgrounds, the library, and a pool. Kids do just fine in urban areas.

    #495380

    gramarye
    Participant

    I think $8 gas is on its way as well, but primarily as an artifact of the depreciation of the dollar rather than as a result of diminishing world oil supplies. As I’ve mentioned on these boards many times, though, I think focusing on the price of gas is less and less relevant a concern the farther into the future we make our horizons. The era of the internal-combustion gasoline engine as the primary power source for consumer transport is very likely in the early stages of decline. Fully electric vehicles powered by microgeneration of various modes is likely to be commonplace within our lifetimes, quite possibly within the 10-20 year window–and like the iPhone, people are likely to be stunned at how quickly it goes from nonexistence to ubiquity. Those technologies will obviously have a dramatic effect on the sustainability of the suburbs: wide, flat roofs with high ratios of surface area to volume are perfect for solar panels.

    ETA: I’ll also second mrsgeedeck’s comments about family size and childbearing age. I’m getting married in July. Kids are unlikely in the immediate future. Even if a suburban home would make sense when we start having kids, that necessity will take a long time to materialize. In fact, the only thing that might prompt me to move earlier is if prices continue to fall and I get the sense that the market is close to a bottom (in which case it might make financial sense to move earlier than I would for purely lifestyle reasons).

    On the other hand, we might very well just say heck with the financial reasons and move when our lifestyles actually do change, even if the housing market has reinflated somewhat a few more years down the line. A lost opportunity to buy a house cheaply may not mean all that much set against a few more years of enjoying living a walkable urban lifestyle.

    #495381

    columbusmike
    Participant

    Ricospaz, I have no problem with the old suburbs you list – although, those older suburbs were actually more or less their own towns until recently and were actually quite walkable.

    The more modern suburbs are the problem. The idea that you have to motor around in a car to do anything is absurd. There’s too much infrastructure compared to the tax base, schools are spread out, there’s no public space, there’s no safety.

    There are ways to make “suburban” style living much more walkable, safe, and sustainable. Unfortunately, good town planning of these places is off the table.

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