Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

"Immigrantification" (n.) - Gentrification by Immigrants

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion “Immigrantification” (n.) – Gentrification by Immigrants

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 48 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #83375
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Spotted this word twice in the local news, and I kind of like it. Coined by a David Walker, a cultural geographer at The Ohio Wesleyan University. Anyone think it has a shot at eventually making it into the dictionary?


    Ethnic businesses ending vacancies

    Friday, August 20, 2010

    BUSINESS FIRST OF COLUMBUS – BY Carrie Ghose

    The Morse Road commercial corridor past the former Northland Mall is likely the only place in Columbus where you can get a temporary henna tattoo and then cross the street for a pinata. It’s immigrant-owned businesses along Morse Road that are credited with preventing the widespread vacancies that were feared when the mall closed in 2002. According to neighborhood groups, ethnic stores sprinkled amid national discount chains have created a diverse destination that is attracting traffic and thus more businesses.

    David Walker, a cultural geographer at Ohio Wesleyan University, has a word for it: “Immigrantification,” or gentrification by immigrants.

    READ MORE: http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2010/08/23/story2.html


    Urban ‘Immigrantification’

    by Linda O’Horo

    During the summer, Ohio Wesleyan University student Jack Schemenauer ’11 worked with assistant professor of geography David Walker, Ph.D., to study how an influx of Somali and Latino residents and merchants is helping to revitalize the Northland area of Columbus. Once a thriving “go-to” spot, the Northland area began to deteriorate when shoppers and merchants migrated to adjacent suburban areas.

    Walker and Schemenauer coined the term “immigrantification,” to describe how immigrants can revitalize blighted neighborhoods affected by businesses and residents seeking suburban development and by “white flight.” Walker says investments made by the new small businesses and the re-creation of vibrant urban landscapes has provided an excellent laboratory for study.

    READ MORE: http://connect2.owu.edu/issues/20100909/newsAndViews/immigrantification.html

    #403380

    cc
    Member

    Sadly, I think they are looked down on and missed for their true entrepreneurship. I guess Andrew Carnegie was seen in the same way. Necessity is often the true business incubator.

    #403381

    I believe that word about sums it up. That corridor has become one of the new “immigrant-ized” area’s of Columbus. It’s just unfortunate that the big box retailers and Northland had to shut down to give the new breed of entrepeneur’s a chance. Hell, not too long back Columbus was so segregated that there were only certain neighborhoods where certain races & nationalities could live–let alone operate a business. Moving forward and inch and still moving backward a foot..progress at it’s finest!

    #403382
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    cc wrote >>
    Sadly, I think they are looked down on and missed for their true entrepreneurship.

    Looked down upon and missed by who? Small Business resource providers or the general public?

    I’ve found the former to be untrue, as many small business resource providers have programs that specifically target and assist minorities and specific impoverished or dilapidated areas.

    If you’re talking about the latter, well… to some extent I agree. There are a lot of people out there who probably either don’t feel comfortable, or have some sort of preconceived notions about the environment in these types of businesses along Morse Road, or the new flea market out east. Unfortunately, this is nothing unique to Columbus. There are ethnic enclaves to some extent in just about every city across the world and they often contain a business community that serves their immediate community and not the greater region.

    Any ideas on how we could work to change this? I have to imagine that these business owners would love new customers of all varieties.

    Fusion Cafe wrote >>
    Hell, not too long back Columbus was so segregated that there were only certain neighborhoods where certain races & nationalities could live–let alone operate a business. Moving forward and inch and still moving backward a foot..progress at it’s finest!

    I don’t think these entrepreneurs are setting up in this area because of any sort of ethnic or racial segregation. It sounds more like it’s attracting small business owners because of the extremely affordable prices.

    #403383

    cc
    Member

    I was referring to the already ‘assimiliated’ general public.

    I think it is also hard for new ethnic minority immigrants to find ‘regular’ jobs (due to illegal but still existent hiring prejudices and lack of networking beyond their ethnic community), which is a catalyst for a lot of these small individually owned businesses. I believe Fusion Cafe is correct that immigrant populations do tend to settle in pockets. Which makes sense as many are learning the a language and have to rely on others who have immigrated before them for asssistance. There are very good programs/incentives for minority owned businesses and they help to address these social needs.

    This is not something new though, just the cheaper rents and dead malls are more suburban now. I think it is part of the American experience which many ethnic immigrants of various nationalities have gone through.

    #403384
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Retail centers in secondary markets attract eclectic mix of tenants
    Business First – by Dan Eaton
    Date: Friday, March 4, 2011

    Retailers and restaurateurs often clamor to locate in strip centers anchored by traffic-driving grocery stores.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/print-edition/2011/03/04/retail-centers-in-secondary-markets.html

    #403385

    cc
    Member

    The spot once was part …

    You’re almost there…
    To access the full benefits of bizWatch and receive a weekly email with aggregated news on all the companies you are following, please provide your email address below.
    Sign Up Now .
    You must have a bizjournals account to follow a company.
    Please Log In or Register.
    ..To Continue Reading:Subscribe Now .

    Read more: Retail centers in secondary markets attract eclectic mix of tenants | Business First

    ———

    no thanks (please test your links) – signed in and wanted further info

    #403386

    Parker
    Participant

    I think the term itself is a little silly (we already have terms like population change, and ethnic turnover), but this process happens all over the US. In the Salinas (CA) area, Hispanic culture has grown exponentially with supporting shops, churches, organizations and other cultural establishments.

    Brooklyn, NY, is another excellent place to see this as it occurs in generational succession. Some parts have changed from one generation to another across groups so that a predominately Chinese area that was Italian, became Pakistani and is now Russian.

    It’s a good thing.

    #403387

    cc
    Member

    I agree the term is lacking as it lacks the historical narrative. Shame on them. I think it is a case of the new media defining ‘new’.

    #403388
    somebuckeye
    somebuckeye
    Participant

    I heard a similar thing is happening in Detroit. Many of the new businesses in the urban core are immigrant owned.

    #403389
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Parker wrote >>
    I think the term itself is a little silly (we already have terms like population change, and ethnic turnover), but this process happens all over the US. In the Salinas (CA) area, Hispanic culture has grown exponentially with supporting shops, churches, organizations and other cultural establishments.
    Brooklyn, NY, is another excellent place to see this as it occurs in generational succession. Some parts have changed from one generation to another across groups so that a predominately Chinese area that was Italian, became Pakistani and is now Russian.
    It’s a good thing.

    To that extent then, this term could be more aptly used to describe this new “wave” of what has already happened multiple times in the past.

    I think the biggest difference for this wave in Columbus is the suburban settlement. Previous generations of immigrant/in-migration settlement was more urban (German Village, Italian Village, even Flytown to an extent) and this time around the settlement is occurring in the semi-aged suburban parts of the city.

    Semantics aside, it’s an interesting movement, and worthwhile of discussion.

    #403390

    drew
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>

    To that extent then, this term could be more aptly used to describe this new “wave” of what has already happened multiple times in the past.
    I think the biggest difference for this wave in Columbus is the suburban settlement. Previous generations of immigrant/in-migration settlement was more urban (German Village, Italian Village, even Flytown to an extent) and this time around the settlement is occurring in the semi-aged suburban parts of the city.

    The most interesting part, to me, is that the new wave of immigrants don’t tend to self-segregate. This snippet, from a NYT article, says it well:

    The old model of American immigration resulted in cloistered inner-city neighborhoods defined by ethnicity and race: Chinatown, Little Italy, the barrio, the bottoms, Greektown. Through the middle years of the 20th century, these communities were places apart, where new arrivals shared burdens and planned assimilation into the melting pot.

    In the 1960s, the historian Carl N. Degler of Stanford University popularized another metaphor: the salad bowl, in which each population group contributes ideas and textures to the cultural composition. Tom Hanchett, the staff historian at the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte, N.C., coined the useful term “salad bowl suburbs” in 2008 to describe post-World War II suburbs where, as he writes on his Web site, “newcomer and native-born intermingle without ethnic boundaries.”

    That sure feels to me like what’s happening in Columbus. Just look at the composition of restaurants in Columbus Square (161 and Cleveland Ave) – Vietnamese next to Somali next to Middle eastern next to Mexican, with Nigerian across the street and Puerto Rican and Persian just a bit farther north.

    To the last point in the quoted section – when we talk with owners of immigrant kitchens, they generally go out of their way to make the point that they welcome everyone and actively work to make a cross-cultural connection through food. One Pakistani restaurant owner said, “People here don’t think much good about Pakistan. It’s in the news and the news is all bad. I’d like to show them something good about it,”… as he hands me a taste of some delicious chicken curry.

    When new waves of immigrants feel comfortable seeking interaction with and support from outside of their own ethnic communities, it seems to indicate a level of optimism and comfort with their adopted hometowns that perhaps hasn’t been there with past waves of immigration. That, to me, seems to be the big story, and seems truly indicative of something new.

    #403391
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    drew wrote >>

    Walker wrote >>
    To that extent then, this term could be more aptly used to describe this new “wave” of what has already happened multiple times in the past.
    I think the biggest difference for this wave in Columbus is the suburban settlement. Previous generations of immigrant/in-migration settlement was more urban (German Village, Italian Village, even Flytown to an extent) and this time around the settlement is occurring in the semi-aged suburban parts of the city.

    The most interesting part, to me, is that the new wave of immigrants don’t tend to self-segregate. This snippet, from a NYT article, says it well:

    The old model of American immigration resulted in cloistered inner-city neighborhoods defined by ethnicity and race: Chinatown, Little Italy, the barrio, the bottoms, Greektown. Through the middle years of the 20th century, these communities were places apart, where new arrivals shared burdens and planned assimilation into the melting pot.
    In the 1960s, the historian Carl N. Degler of Stanford University popularized another metaphor: the salad bowl, in which each population group contributes ideas and textures to the cultural composition. Tom Hanchett, the staff historian at the Levine Museum of the New South in Charlotte, N.C., coined the useful term “salad bowl suburbs” in 2008 to describe post-World War II suburbs where, as he writes on his Web site, “newcomer and native-born intermingle without ethnic boundaries.”

    That sure feels to me like what’s happening in Columbus. Just look at the composition of restaurants in Columbus Square (161 and Cleveland Ave) – Vietnamese next to Somali next to Middle eastern next to Mexican, with Nigerian across the street and Puerto Rican and Persian just a bit farther north.
    To the last point in the quoted section – when we talk with owners of immigrant kitchens, they generally go out of their way to make the point that they welcome everyone and actively work to make a cross-cultural connection through food. One Pakistani restaurant owner said, “People here don’t think much good about Pakistan. It’s in the news and the news is all bad. I’d like to show them something good about it,”… as he hands me a taste of some delicious chicken curry.
    When new waves of immigrants feel comfortable seeking interaction with and support from outside of their own ethnic communities, it seems to indicate a level of optimism and comfort with their adopted hometowns that perhaps hasn’t been there with past waves of immigration. That, to me, seems to be the big story, and seems truly indicative of something new.

    +1

    #403392

    What Drew said and said very well.

    A.

    #403393
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Agreed. Well put, Drew.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 48 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Local journalism is more important than ever. Please take a moment to read a bit about our mission and consider financially supporting our cause.

CLICK HERE