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How Does Your Garden Grow?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion How Does Your Garden Grow?

Viewing 9 posts - 826 through 834 (of 834 total)
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  • #1103361

    patient_zero
    Participant

    Porky’s stray pitbull could enhance that story Alex. Just trying to temp you and Linda…

    #1106339

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Here’s something from one of the hot pepper discussion boards:

    The Shorokshary I suppose is the Soroksári – a pepper originating from Hungary. It is a yellow one, red when rippen. You can see a picture here http://www.kupindo.com/Seme/28244029_Soroksari-paprika-seme

    Feher Ozon (feher means white), Alma (which means apple), Szegedi 80 (Szeged is a city in Hungary) and Szentesi Cseresnye (Szentes – a city in Hungary, cseresnye – cherry, Szentesi Cseresnye – cherry from Szentes) are all from Hungary too.

    Kurtovska Kapija is written in Serbian kind of writing – however is a pepper well known here, in the Balcans, named Kapia in Romania (where I live). Not so sure of origins, however the name Kurtovska Kapija is strange, it means Kurt’s Kapija, and Kurt is a German name. According to the information from here http://www.institut-palanka.co.rs/eng/assortment/pepper/14080201.html which is an Agriculture Institute from Serbia, its origins are in Macedonia.

    I am not sure about your “clasification” as Paprika, but if you mean they are for making the powder named Paprika, I think the Kurtovska Kapija don’t really belong here – in fact I think only Szegedi 80 is a “dedicated” pepper for making paprika. Of course, there is no limitation, you can dry any pepper and mill as powder, but is not the same as the classical paprika.

    In fact the Kapija is more used for cooking what Serbians call Ajvar and/or Pindjur, or what we call in Romania as Zacusca. For sure there are variations in Bulgaria and Hungary too.

    We, in Romania, also use to grill the Kapija (on a metal plate), peel the peppers, and make a mix of water, sugar, salt, vinegar, and let the peppers soak in this mix, and eat them – like a kind of salad. You can cut also small pieces of garlic in that mix. This, of course, probably can be find in other neighbour country (well, we had a crazy history here, with area conquered by otomans, by one or another country, and this led to a mix of population, and also a mix of food, which is very benefic, I would say :) ).

    Now a bit of lingvistic informations:

    -in Magyar (the language spoken in Hungary) the letter S is spoken as SH in English, SZ as a normal S, GE somehow like GUE in guest, CS as a kind of Ch from Chechen Republic. So, Szentesi Cseresnye would be read as Senteshee Chereshnye.

    -in Serbian J is a kind of Y, so you read Kurtovska Kapya (the letters from Kurtovska are as in English).

    Oh, I see I babble again… Sorry for such a long post!

    #1106343

    joev
    Participant

    I’ve still got kale, celery, mint, parsley and rosemary going strong. The last hot peppers came in right before Thanksgiving (a month longer than usual.) Crazy mild late-fall!

    #1106395

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I haven’t mentioned that I moved last summer, and I have to start my gardens from scratch. I hope to get some beds started before the ground freezes.

    So far I’ve begun a rain garden basin, and the soil is awful, packed clay and gravel like digging in roadbed. It takes more than a week to drain down, which is supposed to happen in 24 – 48 hours. I don’t yet know if the whole yard is like that; if it is, I’ll probably have to go with raised beds and purchased soil. I have a lot of room and sun.

    I got one rain barrel from FSWCD and I’ll probably get a second one. The neighborhood discussion board complains of high water bills.

    Here’s the basin so far. I’m still figuring out the size; it has grown since this pic. Now I would guess its capacity to be at least about 150 gallons. It’s fed by two downspouts. Next year I’ll backfill it with compost and plant it up.

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    #1106404

    Nancy H
    Participant

    I moved last year too. I started an herb bed and grew a few tomatoes and other plants in containers but was not a very happy gardener. I greatly reduced the brick paver patio area so I would have more grassy area for the dog. Also had an American Black Walnut and a large weed trees cut down in the tiny rear yard.

    My soil is not very good and it took all summer to get grass established. Most vegetables won’t survive a walnut tree’s toxins. Since the toxins remain in the ground until the roots rot, I will be building some raised beds next spring for vegetables. I have lots of paver bricks for building the walls from reducing the patio and sidewalk area.

    I have no earthworms in my yard, just an occasional grub or cicada. The house was treated for termites 3 years before I bought it. Whatever they put in the lawn to kill the termites obviously killed everything else too.

    I too added a rain barrel and will probably add another. The real bite to water costs is you not only pay for the water, you also pay for it going down the drain. The City assumes all water consumption is for things like showering, laundry, washing dishes, etc. When I ran numbers on it, I estimated that a rain barrel will take about 5 years to pay for itself. I suspect their life expectancy is probably about 5 to 6 years, so probably not much financial gain, but still a worthwhile investment from an environmental standpoint.

    Back in October, I went up to the OSU equestrian farm near Don Scott Field and picked up two cubic yards of horse manure. Apparently they pile up the manure from mucking out the stalls for use in any number of their garden areas. It had already started breaking down nicely (little if any smell to it). OSU still uses straw for bedding material, which I like much better than wood chips. As I was shoveling the manure into five gallon buckets for transport I was delighted to discover it is filled with huge night crawlers. I layered it up with some leaves and green trimmings in a big temporary compost bin. Plan to mix that in with some peat and purchased soil for my new raised bed garden.

    #1106420

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    What, you can still get manure at Don Scott? I used to do that years ago but now it’s a BIOSECURE AREA with a gate across the driveway.

    Plus, I’m on the west side now so I could ask around some of the Darby farms.

    #1106430

    Nancy H
    Participant

    What, you can still get manure at Don Scott? I used to do that years ago but now it’s a BIOSECURE AREA with a gate across the driveway.

    Plus, I’m on the west side now so I could ask around some of the Darby farms.

    I might have been misinformed, but was told the gate and other security was because they board some privately owned horses there rather than concerns about biological materials. From what I can tell they don’t make it known publicly that you can pick up manure. I found a contact in a rather round about way, and was able to make arrangements for a pickup. PM me if you have any interest in doing the same.

    #1106465

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Back in the previous century they had a pile, most of which was aged, and you could scoop what you wanted. Then they switched to spreading it in the pastures, and there was no pile. Then they installed and closed the gate.

    #1106482

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I might have been misinformed, but was told the gate and other security was because they board some privately owned horses there rather than concerns about biological materials

    Back in the day they let me mingle with the herds. Just don’t open or close any gates. I learned that any horse with a research number shaved into its rump was likely to resent contact – but sometimes a horse would run to me like Hey, it’s a human! I figure they were horses owned by students and boarded at the facility, feeling lonely.

    But they locked the place down after mad cow and hoof-and-mouth, and probably out of a general sense of needing to secure the place better anyway. Maybe they had some thefts, I don’t know.

    Way WAY back when there was a boarding stable at Bethel/Olentangy where the sports park is now, and they had a nice old pile. (Can a pile of shit be a Ghost of Columbus Past?) Mom sewed up big burlap bags and we ran trunkloads of the stuff up to the gardens at the house. We called them shit runs.

Viewing 9 posts - 826 through 834 (of 834 total)

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