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How Does Your Garden Grow?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion How Does Your Garden Grow?

Viewing 15 posts - 601 through 615 (of 834 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #250634
    murfmurphy
    murfmurphy
    Participant

    The Walmart at Tuttle Crossing has their seed aisle all set up and ready to go. I walked by it on Saturday afternoon.

    #250635

    shmack
    Member

    does anyone have any experience with vermiculture? i’m considering a worm factory cuz the critters seem to compost small amounts (1/2lb per week) of food scraps faster than a cold/hot compost pile. nevermind that i would never be able to build a hot (compost) pile anyways with just 1/2lb of fruit & veggie scraps anyways. wanted to see if anyone could share their experiences. thanks!

    (OH, and most importantly… i’ve read that giving my pets coffee grounds will yield in compost that tends to be more resistant to fusarium wilt. i don’t want the same thing to happen this season as last season… as illustrated a couple pages earlier in this thread.)

    #250636

    shmack
    Member

    what i’ve got planned this season:

    red kale, tuscan kale, curly kale.
    sun golds and ground cherries.
    tarragon, basil, thyme.
    and the usual lettuce mix.

    SO EXCITING!! i’m gonna start them this weekend!

    #250637

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Slight derail, it looks like FOSR will be able to sow a few wildflower areas along O’Shaughnessy.

    Here at home, there might be some childrens gardens this year.

    #250638

    joev
    Participant

    I’m adding a raised bed just for kale, collards and chard.
    This weekend, I’ll start peppers and eggplant, and I’m excited to sow an 8′ row of okra when the weather warms up!

    #250639
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I am way behind. Have some letuce and cabbages under the lights, need to start the leeks asap. Need to do more lettuce starts, some broccoli, maybe some brussels sprouts. Will start peppers and tomatoes in about 2 weeks.

    #250640
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I am way behind. Have some letuce and cabbages under the lights, need to start the leeks asap. Need to do more lettuce starts, some broccoli, maybe some brussels sprouts. Will start peppers and tomatoes in about 2 weeks.

    #250641
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    Produce from urban gardens could contain lead

    http://news.yahoo.com/produce-urban-gardens-could-contain-lead-183952706.html

    Urban food gardens offer a great source of affordable, nutritious fruits and veggies for city dwellers, but high levels of toxic metals in soil, especially lead, could pose health risks for people who grow or eat the produce, according to some scientists.

    “In places where the soil is heavily contaminated, urban food production may raise as many public health concerns as it solves,” said Samantha Langley-Turbaugh, a soil scientist at the University of Southern Maine in Portland. Langley-Turnbaugh discussed the risks associated with growing produce in contaminated soil at the annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston earlier this month.

    Toxic metals, such as lead, zinc and cadmium, are commonly found in soil, particularly in urban areas. And lead is neurotoxic, especially to babies and young children. Previous studies have linked lead to cognitive and developmental delays, lower IQs, violent behavior and health problems, such as high blood pressure. As in the case with lead, exposure to cadmium may lead to learning disabilities, while too much zinc can cause nausea, diarrhea and anemia.

    #250642

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    It’s tough for kids these days. Back when, you could just peel the paint off the wall to nibble lead, but now you have to eat your vegetables.

    #250643

    joev
    Participant

    lazyfish said:
    Produce from urban gardens could contain lead

    http://news.yahoo.com/produce-urban-gardens-could-contain-lead-183952706.html

    Urban food gardens offer a great source of affordable, nutritious fruits and veggies for city dwellers, but high levels of toxic metals in soil, especially lead, could pose health risks for people who grow or eat the produce, according to some scientists.

    “In places where the soil is heavily contaminated, urban food production may raise as many public health concerns as it solves,” said Samantha Langley-Turbaugh, a soil scientist at the University of Southern Maine in Portland. Langley-Turnbaugh discussed the risks associated with growing produce in contaminated soil at the annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston earlier this month.

    Toxic metals, such as lead, zinc and cadmium, are commonly found in soil, particularly in urban areas. And lead is neurotoxic, especially to babies and young children. Previous studies have linked lead to cognitive and developmental delays, lower IQs, violent behavior and health problems, such as high blood pressure. As in the case with lead, exposure to cadmium may lead to learning disabilities, while too much zinc can cause nausea, diarrhea and anemia.

    Raised beds are always a good idea in urban gardens.

    #250644
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    true that, the article made some good points about raising the alkalinity to reduce lead uptake….most fertilizers increase acidity so that can be an issue….also root crops bad, leaf crops better, fruit least impacted by heavy metal uptake.

    #250645

    tdziemia
    Participant

    Whether it matters or not depends on your age, I suppose. At my age, all kinds of other things are more likely to do me in than a trace of lead or cadmium in my diet :-)) If I still had kids in the house, that would be a different story.
    I would wonder about how large a dose one can possibly get if consuming products of an urban garden, say, every other day, over just a 5-6 month period?
    I know nothing about reputation or efficacy, but here is a test kit for heavy metals that comes up if you do an internet search.

    http://www.millnut.com/Heavy-Metal-Testing-Kit-By-Wonder-Labs_p_116.html

    Of course, you would need to know what levels should trigger concern …

    #250646

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Hey gardeners, does anyone want some hoop-type plant supports like these?

    http://www.plantsupports.org/plant-support/hoop-shape-plant-support.html

    I probably have 40 of them, my mother got them for peonies so they don’t go face-flat in the rain. I strongly prefer stakes and string. Anyway, these can support other plants like peppers. Up for grabs, PM me.

    #250647

    shmack
    Member

    I set up my worm hut this morning… I’m really excited about this… Should only be 1-2 months before I have my first tray of compost!

    #250648

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I have winter aconite blooming on sunny days.

Viewing 15 posts - 601 through 615 (of 834 total)

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