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How Does Your Garden Grow?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion How Does Your Garden Grow?

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 834 total)
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  • #250064

    Thanks for the Garden Web link. My Dad loves Garden Web, but he’s way out in Missouri. Not sure if I’ll go all the way out to Hilliard, but maybe :)

    In the city, there was a little activity with the Martha Walker garden club in VV. They had a spring plant trade/potluck, too, and a community garden in the neighborhood, but it seemed a little less active this past year. I’ll check in with those folks, and see if we can get things heated up with that group this year. I’ll post anything here that I find out…

    Depending on the perennials you have to give, we might take some at Goodale Park — especially if you’d help to weed them wherever they were planted…maybe adopt a bed, and plant them there. Let me know, and I can hook you up on that :) For folks looking for places to grow flowers, Goodale Park has lots of opportunities where you can be a bed captain. Get to meet lots of interesting folks, and I’d likely feature you on the website (we just started featuring volunteers). Feel free to PM me if you’re interested…

    #250065

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Chris, was the rain garden project at the Goodale shelterhouse ever officially killed, or is there still a chance it may happen?

    #250066

    alexs wrote >>
    Chris, was the rain garden project at the Goodale shelterhouse ever officially killed, or is there still a chance it may happen?

    You’re gonna hate to hear this, but you are talking to one of the board members opposed to the rain garden. AND I’m a big rain garden supporter (where they make sense), and have served as a docent for garden tours at the ODNR for the raingarden and wildlife gardens there. The ODNR has an excellent example of a raingarden for demonstration purposes.

    My reasons for being opposed to the raingarden at the Goodale Shelter House:

    1) The shelter house does not currently empty rainwater to the sewers. It’s already disconnected, and the water gently seeps into ground already (so, it’s not a normal spot you’d want a rain garden). Although, rain barrels make sense in this spot (but we have other issues getting approval for that).
    2) We didn’t have a good spot for the garden. The suggested spot is used for the main Comfest stage.
    3) We already have more beds than we can easily maintain, and are always seeking volunteers to help. Although there are “promises” that volunteers will be provided to maintain it, since you otherwise aren’t turning out to help the park, how do I know you’ll have the volunteers here to do this? The first year of a rain garden is especially intensive , as in addition to regular weeding, it will actually require regular watering to establish, and watering is problematic at the park. If you volunteer at the park, you’ll get a better understanding of what we’re already up against (especially if you do some of the watering). We (the Friends, not the city) paid for watering beds that weren’t near the pond, at a cost of $1000 last year.
    4) Raingardens aren’t always super attractive, and this would be something visitors to the park would likely complain about in later years. – Although this isn’t my biggest reason, but with other damage to the park last year, I think beautification is a priority over demonstration.

    Anyway, those were my reasons that I didn’t support it. Maybe if you start volunteering at the park, and really understand what we do, you can be in a better position to sell us on this idea…

    #250067

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    OK, that answers my questions. FOSR is working with COSI and the Friends of Westgate Park to install rain gardens. Elayna Grody (formerly of CRPD) suggested Goodale as a very visible location for such a projet.

    However I did take some “before” pics on a rainy day, when the roof runoff was going down the stairs on the southwest corner.

    #250068
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    alexs wrote >>
    OK, that answers my questions. FOSR is working with COSI and the Friends of Westgate Park to install rain gardens. Elayna Grody (formerly of CRPD) suggested Goodale as a very visible location for such a projet.
    However I did take some “before” pics on a rainy day, when the roof runoff was going down the stairs on the southwest corner.

    yep there is a run-off problem at the house…I think a french drain is the way to solve the issue…also at the gazebo is another massive drainage issue if you witnessed the 08 ComFest and the devastation of the grass after the rain….

    so back to the gardens questions…I keep thinking with the economic crisis and all, that maybe 09 is the year of the edible ornamentals. Usually I’m mainly about the flowers and less interested in the food stuff, being a feral regressive bachelor, but I keep thinking that maybe food will become an important part of my flower garden this year.

    Am thinking about red sorghum and amaranthus…salivia, artichokes (is there an Ohio variety that will fruit) love the nasturiums and ornamental kales and chard…I like the various colored tomotoes and peppers….I’m guess that 09 will be another drought year as it seems that every year or at least part of every year has a serious drought….so any thoughts about drought tolerant ornamental food sources?

    #250069

    lazyfish wrote >>
    I keep thinking that maybe food will become an important part of my flower garden this year.
    ….so any thoughts about drought tolerant ornamental food sources?

    Decided to post the reply here for anyone else interested in edibles like this. This is another of my passions — edibles (including off the beaten path).
    Many herbs are drought tolerant, including: garlic, fennel, lavendar, oregano, and once established, sage (you mentioned salvia) and thyme.
    Veggies: lettuce (it will eventually bolt, but is pretty drought tolerant in spring and fall, and makes a pretty edging), snap beans, and if well mulched: onions, varieties of pepper and tomatoes. There are drought tolerant varieties of other crops being developed by Monsanto, but despite being born and raised in St. Louis, I have issues with Monsanto and their crops and small farmers (that’s a whole other discussion), so I wouldn’t suggest any of those.
    Non-traditional: Yucca, Daylilies (not Lilies), spiderwort, ground cherry, prickly pear (this cactus may be an issue for children and dogs – it’s not the spines you see, it’s the tiny ones all over you don’t), New Jersey Tea.
    Unfortunately, some of the best drought tolerant edibles are weeds (such as purslane, dandelion, violets, LOTS of others), and so I won’t suggest them.
    I’ll have to find the Raintree Nursery catalog and see if they have other ideas.
    My neighbor, John (the one with the beautiful paw-paw in the front yard, and who is retired from I think the Ohio EPA…or was it the ODNR) grows unusual edibles and is into permaculture (well, we went to a permaculture lecture together). He may have a lot of ideas. Maybe I should have you over for a snack sometime to meet him and toss around ideas.

    #250070

    Ganny
    Member

    Help! I am moving to Columbus (Italian Village) and i am looking for community garden space in the area. Does anyone have any information? Thanks!

    #250071
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    Yes, click on your name to go into your profile and you will see the other thread you started about this same topic. :)
    Lots of good responses and ideas there.
    https://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/community-garden-space

    #250072

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    I really want to do some container gardening this year, but not sure where to start. I don’t have any greenspace, but I have a nice sized patio that (I think?) gets pretty good light.

    Any advice for a total novice? I’d be on board if some of the experts on CU wanted to give a little gardening 101 class :)

    #250073

    LauraA
    Member

    I can show you what I do Somer. I have no greenspace but last year I did cherry tomatoes, green peppers and herbs. This year I’m going to expand it a little. I got a window planter from my mom that is 6′ long and since the neighbors didn’t complain, I think more pots are going to be a-ok.

    #250074
    Porky
    Porky
    Participant

    Container gardening is easy and ideal for limited space.
    You control everything in a container garden, from the soil, to the nutrients to the location.
    You can grow just about anything in a container.
    We grow lettuce in containers.
    We also grow tomatoes and all kinds of peppers in pots.

    #250075

    DonnaTate
    Member

    I really would like to have a garden this year, but don’t have a yard. I like the idea of container gardening, I might have to look into that more.

    My parents were always big into gardening. They did a lot of square foot gardening, and I always though that was a great way to utilize soil resources etc. They also had an orchard, which was probably my favorite thing. It was nice always having fresh cherries, apples, peaches, grapes, rhubarb, etc…

    #250076

    alison
    Member

    Stuff doesn’t just taste better, it seems to *feel* better when you just harvested it yourself, doesn’t it?

    I’ve moved since last year, to a place with (if possible) even less yard than before. But I own it, and I’ve got big plans. The 10′ by 30′ fenced backyard is mostly shade, so that’s going to be subdued woodland types, but the south facing 6′ by 31′ front yard has got some real flower and veggie potential. Once I build some walls and scrape up the little vestige of turf.

    Anyone know of someone competent who could build a 30′ by 2′ brick wall? I’ve got the bricks, but don’t really trust my masonery skills for something right out on the street.

    #250077

    Mercurius
    Participant

    Time to buy your seeds. Many things need seeded indoors come late March.
    I’m buying mostly from Seed Savers[/url] and John Scheeper’s Kitchen Garden Seeds.

    #250078
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    Here are some upcoming classes I just found out about today. I think they sound cool. I would like to grow some raspberries soon.
    http://ourohio.org/resources/grow-and-know/

    http://ourohio.org/resources/grow-and-know/farming-on-five-to-fifty/

    Plus Malabar Farms is a really neat place to visit.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 834 total)

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