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How Does Your Garden Grow?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion How Does Your Garden Grow?

Viewing 15 posts - 406 through 420 (of 834 total)
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  • #250439
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    Interesting. http://1bog.org/blog/live-off-the-land-2/%5B/url%5D

    About 3,000 sq ft for growing wheat for one person, if none of it is diverted to feed livestock— How much does anyone on this thread know about whatever grains are being grown in greater Columbus or Central Ohio ?

    I’m guessing growing grains requires more time, space, and knowledge. Stutzman Farms sells oatmeal, rye berry and spelt berry via Greener Grocer and the Clintonville Community Market and maybe other places.

    But among urban and suburban vegetable and fruit growers, I’ve yet to meet anyone growing at least some of their own grains.

    If I’m not mistaken, not even any of the farmers I’ve met who have CSA programs in or near Columbus grow grains. I’ve been told—apparently hypothetically–grain Amaranth ( a good plant-based source of calcium) can grow in this climate.

    #250440
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    The kale, collards and headless cabbage( whose leaves may be savory, not merely palatable and edible) are doing well in this photo taken on Thanksgiving Day.

    But the scene below would be better if there were a large, 3-section compost bin, likely about a foot away from that wooden fence.

    I’ve buried hundreds of pounds of food scraps in the soil in this photo and the soil to its unphotographed left. That’s better than ‘throwing it away,’ even if some of the methane at the Franklin County Landfill is being used to power CNG vehicles.

    Though I don’t bury food scraps too close to growing plants, what is buried enriches the soil after a few months or more.

    But this is not good enough. Using a compost bin or red wiggler worms would be better. Digging up the ground in order to bury food scraps disrupts microbes and earth worms.

    What are other folk here doing in regards to composting ?

    Kale, collards, and headless cabbage in late November central Ohio garden

    #250441

    joev
    Participant

    My kale, Swiss chard, arugula, fennel and parsley are still going strong, along with the rosemary, oregano, sage and thyme.

    #250442
    Porky
    Porky
    Participant

    just had a salad for lunch yesterday with some of the few varieties of lettuce we still have going, been covering them at night when the temps drop too low.

    #250443
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    The kale, collards and headless cabbage( whose leaves may be savory, not merely palatable and edible) are doing well in this photo taken on Thanksgiving Day.

    But the scene below would be better if there were a large, 3-section compost bin, likely about a foot away from that wooden fence.

    I’ve buried hundreds of pounds of food scraps in the soil in this photo and the soil to its unphotographed left. That’s better than ‘throwing it away,’ even if some of the methane at the Franklin County Landfill is being used to power CNG vehicles.

    Though I don’t bury food scraps too close to growing plants, what is buried enriches the soil after a few months or more.

    But this is not good enough. Using a compost bin or red wiggler worms would be better. Digging up the ground in order to bury food scraps disrupts microbes and earth worms.

    What are other folk here doing in regards to composting ?

    Kale, collards, and headless cabbage in late November central Ohio garden

    I have a large cedar compost pile, four by four by six that I do by the cold method. It was just recently emptied into the kitchen garden and restarted with the leaves from the yard intermixed with compost from the piled I saved as a starter. It gets all the scraps from teh kitchen all year. I sort of turn it and poke it with rebar for air holes during the year.

    Right now with that compost the kitchen garden has a patch of arugula, spinach and lettuce that I can occasionally harvest that will overwinter in place for a huge spring harvest we eat off until spring lettuce is ready.

    For yours I would get a small roll of rabbit fencing to put in one corner of your garden that I would put compost in then pick the fence up and move every year to a new corner, spreading the stuff out after moving the fence in the fall then start a new pile with leaves and garden waste. I did this for years in a different spot. Only takes up 4 square feet and you can grow squash in it in the summer. a 25 foot roll of fencing makes two 4 foot in diameter three foot high compost bins.

    #250444
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    derm said:
    I have a large cedar compost pile, four by four by six that I do by the cold method. It was just recently emptied into the kitchen garden and restarted with the leaves from the yard intermixed with compost from the piled I saved as a starter. It gets all the scraps from teh kitchen all year. I sort of turn it and poke it with rebar for air holes during the year.

    Right now with that compost the kitchen garden has a patch of arugula, spinach and lettuce that I can occasionally harvest that will overwinter in place for a huge spring harvest we eat off until spring lettuce is ready.

    For yours I would get a small roll of rabbit fencing to put in one corner of your garden that I would put compost in then pick the fence up and move every year to a new corner, spreading the stuff out after moving the fence in the fall then start a new pile with leaves and garden waste. I did this for years in a different spot. Only takes up 4 square feet and you can grow squash in it in the summer. a 25 foot roll of fencing makes two 4 foot in diameter three foot high compost bins.

    Thanks, an additional option would be to make a bin from several wooden pallets. But the method you suggest allows for greater mobility.

    Sounds like you’re both using the compost as a medium for growing crops while also mixing it with soil in your garden in a larger growing area.

    Some permaculture enthusiasts say I shouldn’t and don’t need to till the garden soil if I have enough compost. But that seems more than I’ll get from my decomposed food scraps and yard materials. What are your thoughts on this ? Thanks again.

    #250445
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I loosely follow the biointensive method, meaning I try to use raised beds(part of my gardening is community garden) That is a no till method to avoid soil compaction. When I had raised beds I did not ever till them. I would dump compost on them and then use a garden fork to lightly mix. Right now in my yard I have about 120 square feet of kitchen garden, it is raised beds and never gets tilled. Just compost dumped on top and loosely mixed when I plant. If you could do that at your home garden it has the benefits of dedicated watering, fertilizing, avoidance of soil compaction and ease of mulching. You concentrate your compost as well. I do a talk for Grandview Parks and REc every year going over things like this. YOu are welcome to attend. It is weds Feb 1st. I will post on it later in the winter.

    #250446
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    What are your garden’s dimensions by the way?

    #250447

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Yep I’m trying to consider compaction as I plan the garden between access paths and growing beds.

    My totem:

    #250448

    labi
    Participant

    For the first time, I was really scrupulous this summer about not disturbing the soil surface in the veg gardens. When I planted, I only made a little furrow for the seeds instead of turning over the whole bed like I used to. After I planted, I mulched all around (mostly grass clippings over newspaper, but some composted horse bedding), and when I pulled the few weeds that came up, I covered any resulting holes back up with mulch. I was amazed at how much less weedy the garden was. Not allowing all the existing weed seeds to get sunlight made such a difference. It’s a benefit of no-till that I never really thought about before now.

    #250449
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    derm said:
    What are your garden’s dimensions by the way?

    In the backyard it’s about 18 ft from north to south and about 50 ft from east to west.

    #250450
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    derm said:
    I loosely follow the biointensive method, meaning I try to use raised beds(part of my gardening is community garden) That is a no till method to avoid soil compaction. When I had raised beds I did not ever till them. I would dump compost on them and then use a garden fork to lightly mix. Right now in my yard I have about 120 square feet of kitchen garden, it is raised beds and never gets tilled. Just compost dumped on top and loosely mixed when I plant. If you could do that at your home garden it has the benefits of dedicated watering, fertilizing, avoidance of soil compaction and ease of mulching. You concentrate your compost as well. I do a talk for Grandview Parks and REc every year going over things like this. YOu are welcome to attend. It is weds Feb 1st. I will post on it later in the winter.

    There is a book by a guy who recommends not using the bio-intensive method which he said is based on the increasingly false assumption of having plentiful water. According to him, we should expect peak oil to affect the availability of safe, municipal water.

    Permaculture media blog

    #250451

    Mercurius
    Participant

    This is a very good resource for bio intensive gardening:
    http://www.amazon.com/How-Grow-More-Vegetables-Possible/dp/1580082335/ref=dp_ob_image_bk

    #250452
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    In the backyard it’s about 18 ft from north to south and about 50 ft from east to west.

    That is a nice size. You could do about eight four foot wide beds, eighteen feet long with a south face and two foot paths between them. Great for rotation of crops and you could eliminate tilling. You would not have to build forms, I used to just define mine by heaping up the dirt from the paths then laying down a heavy mulch from tree trimming trucks. 8-10″ of wood chips on the paths is a good weed deterrent and you keep your feet from being wet or muddy in the garden. I wish I had a sunny backyard.

    #250453
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    There is a book by a guy who recommends not using the bio-intensive method which he said is based on the increasingly false assumption of having plentiful water. According to him, we should expect peak oil to affect the availability of safe, municipal water.

    Permaculture media blog

    I only read part of the link, but find that an odd assumption based on the fact that the biointensive method is basically how people gardened before municipal water supplies and commercial fertilizer existed. The use of mulch eliminates the need for frequent watering when coupled with organic matter enriched soil and compost heavy soil does not need a commercial, petroleum based fertilizer. I grow heavy feeders every year in my kitchen garden with compost only as the additive. A small rain barrel can assist watering if needed when young and then if you mulch your plants the ground will hold the moisture a long time. Especially here in clay heavy OH. Maybe that writer is in Arizona.

Viewing 15 posts - 406 through 420 (of 834 total)

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