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Help me understand the hate for Mayor Coleman

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Help me understand the hate for Mayor Coleman

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Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 97 total)
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  • #278448

    Coy
    Participant

    Coy said:
    The only thing that ever really struck me about Coleman was that when we were in the middle of closing a bunch of rec centers and kids programs around downtown, the Lincoln theatre was being built. There was an article in one of the local papers talking about how the balcony section cost an extra million to build, but that Coleman insisted upon it because he “had to have his balcony”, or some such nonsense.
    The Lincoln Theatre is great, but it was completely tone deaf at the time to make a remark like that…

    ChrisSunami said:All the rec centers were reopened and the Lincoln theater is making a profit. What more do people want?

    “The Lincoln Theatre is great, but it was completely tone deaf at the time to make a remark like that…”

    WTF is ridiculous about that remark?
    The Davis Center in my neighborhood was on the chopping block and the mayor was being grandiose about dropping a million on a superficial balcony at another theatre project, regardless of where the pool of money was coming from.
    It was tone deaf, and not any greener grass issue.

    I like Coleman, but he can be a cocky dude at times, was all I was trying to get across.

    #278449
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I like the guy. If I had to nitpick, I would say he wears too much makeup when I see him in public, but you need to take good pics.

    He is waaaay pro Columbus. One thing that folks may not know is that he can be a real bully to suburbs like Grandview in terms of what he wants to benefit Columbus and does not like to bend an inch. Tore some concessions from NW to get the Grandview yard going as he did not want the taxes across Olentangy River RD. I think that his focus on the core of the city is genius. Would Franklinton and some of the higher crime near ring parts of the city benefit from more of the tax money? Probably, but I am not as sold on their future awesomeness as some. I think focusing on the city proper was a genius move.

    #278450
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    derm said:
    He is waaaay pro Columbus. One thing that folks may not know is that he can be a real bully to suburbs like Grandview in terms of what he wants to benefit Columbus and does not like to bend an inch. Tore some concessions from NW to get the Grandview yard going as he did not want the taxes across Olentangy River RD. I think that his focus on the core of the city is genius. Would Franklinton and some of the higher crime near ring parts of the city benefit from more of the tax money? Probably, but I am not as sold on their future awesomeness as some. I think focusing on the city proper was a genius move.

    Well, in all fairness, he *is* the Mayor of Columbus and not the Mayor of Grandview Heights. While there are certain things that must co-exist between cities, at the end of the day, taxes go to one or the other. Any resident of Columbus should want a mayor willing to exert some level of power to keep jobs and tax dollars within the city, or shared through JEDDs or other deals. I do think cities and suburbs need to play fair with each other, and applaud job-poaching agreements (if they actually have any teeth), though a return of jobs and people and tax dollars into Columbus is needed to balance out 50 years of sprawl that sucked life out of the core of the city.

    #278451

    cheap
    Member

    Walker said:
    though a return of jobs and people and tax dollars into Columbus is needed to balance out 50 years of sprawl that sucked life out of the core of the city.

    thank mayors like Coleman for that sprawl,too.

    #278452
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    cheap said:
    thank mayors like Coleman for that sprawl,too.

    Not really sure what you mean. Sprawl was rampant in every major city in the US from WWII to… uh… today. We can thank pretty much 95% of mayors across the country for that, along with thousands of other politicians, lobbyists and countless others.

    #278453

    Gig3000
    Member

    Cheap isn’t sure what he means either…He’s just anti-democrats i believe.

    #278454
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Hi Coy, I didn’t mean my comment as a swipe at yours, sorry if it came across that way.

    One thing that folks may not know is that he can be a real bully to suburbs like Grandview in terms of what he wants to benefit Columbus and does not like to bend an inch

    .

    Yeah, that’s a lot of what I love about Coleman. Of course, I’m radically anti-suburb.

    #278455

    cheap
    Member

    ChrisSunami said:
    I’m radically anti-suburb.

    lol

    #278456

    Polis
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Not really sure what you mean. Sprawl was rampant in every major city in the US from WWII to… uh… today.

    Sprawl is a pretty broad concept but I think cheap was referring to the lack of development control, creating an environment with far too much retail. While not exactly Coleman’s fault, he did propogate continued, almost uninhibited, development of both retail and residential.

    I don’t hate Coleman, but I am definitely not impressed. Last election was basically a vote on what mustache I liked better.

    #278457
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Polis said:
    While not exactly Coleman’s fault, he did propogate continued, almost uninhibited, development of both retail and residential.

    Examples?

    #278458
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Sprawl isn’t having too much retail (although that can be a symptom). It’s the spreading out of metropolitan areas over large, widely separated, low-population-density tracts of land.

    Whether you like or hate the mayor, I think it’s hard to argue that he hasn’t been in opposition to that trend. He’s put most of his attention into high-density, center-city areas, the very opposite of sprawl.

    #278459

    Polis
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Examples?

    I heard it directly from a planning staff member. I’m not saying it’s all on the Mayor, the council has just as much responsibility as did the previous administration, but the state of the city reflects upon the Mayor’s office. Last time I looked at the city’s budget, transportation costs were fairly expensive. Now, though, he seems to be all about urban revitalization and being green, as is the national trend.

    E. Broad St. developments near Waggoner Rd. and Polaris are two examples of sprawl that I don’t believe the Mayor spoke out against. I could be wrong but I can’t find any evidence he objected. I haven’t lived in Columbus very long but from what I can tell looking at the land use changes over a few decades it’s apparent the council and mayor’s offices, for decades, have allowed sprawl to continue to this day.

    @ChristSunami A broad definition of sprawl is simply spreading away from the city; dense, streetcar suburbs are considered sprawl as is the now common image of a McMansion suburb. Population density alone does not define sprawl, but rather a combination of factors, including how the individual defines sprawl. Retail, office and other densities are additional factors. If population density alone was used, it could be likely that Polaris would not be considered sprawl since there are so many apartments.

    What I should say is I did not mean to define sprawl as having too much retail, but rather it seemed like cheap was referring to that issue.

    #278460
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Cool, thanks for the clarification. I completely agree that more should be done to curb greenfield development on a regional basis, which I think hinges on the combined efforts of multiple municipality leaders and county leaders in addition to The City of Columbus.

    Without a regional effort, sprawl remains a “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” situation for any individual city. If Coleman put his foot down about new sprawling greenfield development within the City of Columbus around Polaris, then developers could easily relocate close by outside the city’s jurisdiction and work with other municipalities who are eager for new development. Land is plentiful up there. Of course, this type of view is very shortsighted, as these types of developers are more interested in making money in the span of a decade or two and then moving on to the next hotspot, leaving legacy costs and cleanup in the hands of the taxpayers. But local leaders are generally more interested in making a splashy announcement about jobs and construction that occurs within their term limit, rather than having a bigger conversation about what that development will mean 20 years down the road for the community.

    It’s going to take a long-view by all leaders to curb these practices. I don’t think any Columbus mayor could address this on their own.

    #278461

    Polis
    Participant

    I agree no single Mayor or politician is going to “turn the tide”, if you will, of decades of development practices. As I said I’m not laying blame on Coleman, I’m just not impressed by him, not yet at least. What he is promoting now is great and hopefully he can leverage the size of the city in favor of revitalization and green initiatives. Columbus has so much control over central Ohio, any policies passed influence nearly the entire region. Contrasting Columbus to Cleveland, a larger metro region but smaller city, I would say Columbus is in an excellent position to promote regional planning, an idea Gov. Kasich is even behind to some extent.

    Personally, I am irked by politicians paying respects to a long range vision but ultimately ignoring most of it in favor of those splashy announcements and endorsements. I am glad that the trend is improving density and politicians are picking up on this as a campaign tool of sorts. I guess I’m just jaded about politicians, are there too many incumbants? not enough? Coleman can really work his 4th term here, and I hope Downtown hits that magic 12k resident mark in his term.

    As a note, I, in no way, think that Earl Smith would have been a better candidate.

    #278462
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Polis said:
    I hope Downtown hits that magic 12k resident mark in his term.

    If it does hit that mark (or even comes close for that matter) don’t you think it’s due to the long-range urban development planning completed through the 2002 Downtown Strategic Plan (PDF Link) and continued with the 2010 Downtown Strategic Plan (PDF Link)?

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