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Goodale Park

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  • #67853
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    There was a giant hackberry tree in Goodale Park which fell down in the big storm, this was in the northwest corner. It had lain there for quite a while, even after most of the other tree casualties had been removed.

    Well, the other day I walked by and it was all gone, and in it’s place… lots and lots of staked and tied baby trees all over the hill!! Kudos to Goodale Park volunteers. I wonder what kind(s) of tree they are, I can’t tell because I’m not that good at winter (leafless) ID.

    Thanks to whoever went out in the cold and did all that planting.

    On a stranger note… has anyone noticed that the southeast corner of the park, across from the Greek church, it always smells… well, really bad? It’s not sewer smell, it smells like garbage or rotting. Like old library paste. It literally smells like that year ’round. My sister and I have both noticed it, we cover our noses when we walk through there. I’ve also noticed that the grass around the sidewalk there never recovered from Comfest (you can still see the outlines of the booths), and… I’ve seen some little roach friends, too . :oops: I’ve looked to see if there are any dumpsters nearby, nope. I know it seems weird to mention it, but it doesn’t seem… healthy.

    So: thanks for the baby trees, do you know what that smell is, haha?

    #245568

    NerosNeptune
    Participant

    Yeah I noticed the tree was taken away maybe a few weeks ago? I was begining to think they were going to leave it there. haven’t walked past there in a bit though.. good to hear they’ve put something else up!

    #245569

    Thanks for your interest. Actually, those trees weren’t planted by the volunteers.

    I checked with fellow board member Rick Frantz (tree guy extraordinaire). He said: Actually, those trees were found and planted by Columbus’ forestry (Jack, Barry Weber & Jim Slyh). There was an Overcup Oak, Nuttall Oak, Chestnut Oak and Swamp Chestnut Oak planted.

    If you’re interested in the trees in the park, we did a google maps (well, Rick did). This will be updated with the changes when we can find the time :)

    http://www.friendsofgoodalepark.org/trees.asp

    I don’t have an answer on the smell. I’ll see what I can find out…

    #245570
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    WOW! What an awesome map. I will save that and my daughter and I

    will go out with our Woody Plants of Ohio book come springtime!

    What a great educational resource. I hear Greenlawn Cemetary is a good place for tree ID exploration as well.

    Thanks for responding… as for the smell, my inner gumshoe is very interested :)

    #245571

    Mercurius
    Participant

    chrisgillespie wrote Thanks for your interest. Actually, those trees weren’t planted by the volunteers.

    I checked with fellow board member Rick Frantz (tree guy extraordinaire). He said: Actually, those trees were found and planted by Columbus’ forestry (Jack, Barry Weber & Jim Slyh). There was an Overcup Oak, Nuttall Oak, Chestnut Oak and Swamp Chestnut Oak planted.

    If you’re interested in the trees in the park, we did a google maps (well, Rick did). This will be updated with the changes when we can find the time :)

    http://www.friendsofgoodalepark.org/trees.asp

    I don’t have an answer on the smell. I’ll see what I can find out… Way cool. They have wifi at the park now too, so you should be able to take a laptop and go from tree to tree. Who’s the dendrologist behind this? I’d like to pat them on the back.

    #245572
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Yeah, hell yeah. Learning native plants together as a family is very rewarding. This is one way to give a family a sense of place and permanence. It is very soothing.

    The other perk is that Goodale is right at hand to us; we can observe the same trees over and over and see how they change throughout the year.

    We look forward to the magnolia bloom in spring. We pick up Kentucky Coffee Tree beans and crack them open, Greta calls them “chocolate plant” because the beans are so deliciously fragrant. The ornamental pears and their flowers’, ahem, kiefery smell are a sure sign of a certain microseason in spring. Ginkos look primordial. Oaks are drily elegant.

    Ah, whoever put this map together, their muse has the right to bear children.

    #245573

    Thanks for all the positive feedback. I’ll be sure it gets back to Rick Frantz. This will make his day! He’s the guy responsible for the maps. I don’t think he’d mind me saying trees and mapping are passions of his, and lucky for him, he does that in his day job, too. He lives in VV, and is the youngest board member and our most eligible bachelor 8) .

    He also occasionally organizes some nature walks in Goodale with other experts. I’m sure we’ll try to do a few of these again next summer. We could probably organize some specifically geared towards children, if you all express an interest in that. In addition to the trees, there is also diverse wildlife and some fun and interesting plants.

    Let me know of your interests, and we’ll see what we can do :D

    #245574

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    chrisgillespie wrote

    He also occasionally organizes some nature walks in Goodale with other experts. I’m sure we’ll try to do a few of these again next summer.

    Please do advertise these on C.U. when you hear about them. Botany is a sadly large gap in my education that I have been trying to fix.

    #245575

    Rockmastermike wrote

    chrisgillespie wrote

    He also occasionally organizes some nature walks in Goodale with other experts. I’m sure we’ll try to do a few of these again next summer.

    Please do advertise these on C.U. when you hear about them. Botany is a sadly large gap in my education that I have been trying to fix.

    Will do. I wasn’t on CU last summer, but I’ll keep you all posted of these next year. I’ll put them in misc events. If anyone has any particular items of interest, don’t hesistate to let me know, and I’ll see what we can put together. We have been fortunate to have some impressive people willing to give of their time and share their knowledge.

    Thanks again!

    #245576

    alison
    Member

    Thanks for this info. Whenever my former-forester father comes to town, we always walk thru Goodale Park. He loves the trees, but there’s a couple of ornamentals he’d love to id for sure.

    #245577

    Manatee wrote … as for the smell, my inner gumshoe is very interested :)

    Actually, changed my mind. Don’t think everyone will remember by next spring. According to Rick, the female Ginkgo that is near that corner could be the cause of the odor. At least, that would explain a pukey smell in the fall. (And I read his email too fast – just glanced at first, and thought he was talking about a creature, then when I started to type the message to Manatee, noticed it was a tree)…

    #245578

    Bear
    Participant

    Maps = techgasmic.

    What I wrote on the other thread about new stuff on the internet being boring elaborations of crap that has existed for twenty years and was better back then?

    Sometimes, that’s totally, totally wrong, and this is one of those times.

    #245579

    alison
    Member

    Female ginkos are actually illegal in some cities because of the smell and the mess the fruits leave.

    There was a female ginko outside the poli sci building at my college. The cat piss aroma was overwhelming…

    #245580
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    WOW! I never would have suspected! I have noticed that ginkgo many times, but never knew ginkgos are dioecious. Or that females have an ahem, freshness problem. Different strokes for… different species, haha.

    From the wiki: Female plants do not produce cones. Two ovules are formed at the end of a stalk, and after pollination, one or both develop into seeds. The seed is 1.5-2 cm long. Its fleshy outer layer (the sarcotesta) is light yellow-brown, soft, and fruit-like. It is attractive in appearance, but contains butanoic acid and smells like rancid butter (which contains the same chemical) or feces when fallen.

    Mystery solved. I will approach the tree tomorrow and sniff around… but not for too long :P

    Thanks!! I was starting to worry it was something unseemly making that smell, but it turns out it was just a little sexual reproduction going on.

    Edit: “Ginkgo” appears to be my spelling kryptonite. Maybe I need to take some ginkgo to help me remember how to spell it, since ginkgo is good for memory. Also: ginkgos are so interesting! Living fossils.

    2nd edit: I wonder what evolutionary advantage the smell creates. Who is the rotten butter-lover?

    #245581

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    Manatee wrote

    Thanks!! I was starting to worry it was something unseemly making that smell, but it turns out it was just a little sexual reproduction going on.

    gettin’ busy IN the PARK!

    ooo la la

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