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Food Deserts

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  • #91674

    News
    Participant

    Just Deserts: 6 Ways to Bring Good Food to Poor NeighborhoodsPrevious ArticleNext Article

    SARAH PARSONS

    May 8, 2012

    As I noted in last week’s column, the connection between poverty and obesity cannot be denied. Studies show that low-income children are much more likely to be overweight than their wealthier counterparts and that more than one-third of adults who earn less than $15,000 a year are obese, while fewer than 25 percent of those who earn more than $50,000 a year are significantly overweight.

    READ MORE: http://www.good.is/post/just-deserts-6-ways-to-bring-good-food-to-poor-neighborhoods/

    #495618
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    http://volokh.com/2012/04/19/studies-undermine-food-desert-obesity-link/

    The two studies used relied on different methodologies but reached the same conclusion: The relative availability of different types of food in a neighborhood has little observable effect on the obesity rate.

    #495619
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    rus said:
    http://volokh.com/2012/04/19/studies-undermine-food-desert-obesity-link/

    The two studies used relied on different methodologies but reached the same conclusion: The relative availability of different types of food in a neighborhood has little observable effect on the obesity rate.

    From a commenter at the NY Times site :

    “This doesn’t seem like a very comprehensive study. Its disappointing to see so much news without a comprehensive analysis of the issue.

    “Are they taking into account the price of goods? Do they rank the type of grocery stores available? More urban supermarkets have much higher prices for HEALTHY foods compared to suburban markets – while less healthy goods are cheaper in urban communities than suburban communities.

    “Just because there is a corner store and supermarket doesn’t mean there is quality food access. Just b/c McDonalds has a salad, it doesn’t mean that salad has any nutritional value (iceberg lettuce). And corner stores may have produce – but are much more expensive than candy, soda, and junk food that many prefer to eat and can get more for their dollar.

    “They fail to account for barriers such as transportation access. For some real impact analysis you should look at the Food Trust (as quoted above in article) and the Reinvestment Fund in Philly.”

    #495620

    News
    Participant

    THE ECOLOGY OF OBESITY
    by Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus
    03/29/2013

    Starting in the mid-nineties, ecologically-minded Americans increasingly came to see farmers markets as a way to bring healthy foods to poor neighborhoods, support local organic agriculture, and even address global warming. During the Bush years, major health philanthropies joined these efforts, making new grocery stores their highest priority in combating obesity, which was disproportionately affecting the poor.

    READ MORE: http://www.newgeography.com/content/003605-the-ecology-obesity

    #495621

    tdziemia
    Participant

    I don’t believe in food deserts.

    I believe in nutritional education.

    Thirty years ago I lived in an low income urban area (West Philly) on $400/mo without a car. I schlepped groceries from my local supermarket, and on weekends from a more distant market (Philly’s one and only Italian Market) by bus. I cooked and ate healthfully, despite having obese parents who did not serve as the best role models. I taught my kids how to et healthfully. One of them lives in a similar neighborhood today, and also has no trouble eating healthfully on low income.

    I am as liberal as anyone, but this stuff is total nonsense. If people stop buying the s–t that constitutes 90% of the items sold in grocery stores, and start buying healthy stuff, the laws of supply and demand will guarantee that stores in those “food deserts” will wake up and smell the coffee … and the brown rice … and the fresh vegetables, and will change.

    #495622
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Yep. Less excuses please.

    #495623

    News
    Participant

    Finding Water in the (Food) Desert

    For years, Columbus’ east side has been a relative “food desert,” a low-income part of town where access to supermarkets and fresh produce is limited. But Saturday marks the opening of the Near East Side Cooperative Market, a member-owned grocery in Olde Town East. This hour, we’ll discuss the market model, its goals and economic viability.

    LISTEN: http://wosu.org/2012/allsides/finding-water-in-the-food-desert/

    #495624

    Bear
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    I don’t believe in food deserts.

    I believe in nutritional education.

    Thirty years ago I lived in an low income urban area (West Philly) on $400/mo without a car. I schlepped groceries from my local supermarket, and on weekends from a more distant market (Philly’s one and only Italian Market) by bus. I cooked and ate healthfully, despite having obese parents who did not serve as the best role models. I taught my kids how to et healthfully. One of them lives in a similar neighborhood today, and also has no trouble eating healthfully on low income.

    I am as liberal as anyone, but this stuff is total nonsense. If people stop buying the s–t that constitutes 90% of the items sold in grocery stores, and start buying healthy stuff, the laws of supply and demand will guarantee that stores in those “food deserts” will wake up and smell the coffee … and the brown rice … and the fresh vegetables, and will change.

    It’s a really interesting question, and to a large extent I agree. I’ve volunteered to help people navigate the pantry at the Foodbank, and there were all kinds—some were very canny about taking the most of whatever was most available, figuring they could make something out of it, while others staunchly resisted any suggestion that involved cooking. And that’s a controlled environment: the food is free and everyone’s already there, so price and accessibility aren’t factors.

    That said, the people in between, the ones who are ambivalent… my guess is that, for those people, having a McDonald’s be twice as close as a greengrocer probably matters.

    #495625

    Bear
    Participant

    By the way, and for what it’s worth: I remember a conversation from a few years ago in which I asked a local sustainable farmer what would help with his business. His answer, without hesitation: Expand WIC. He said that low-income mothers with young kids very often bought as much of his stuff as they could.

    #1065110

    News
    Participant

    Panelists Discuss Food Deserts and Nutrition Access In Urban Communities
    February 26, 2015 7:00 am – Jesse Bethea

    Members of the Columbus Metropolitan Club gathered Wednesday to listen to a panel discussion about the pressing issue of food and food access in Ohio. The panelists talked about the danger of “food deserts,” areas where people, frequently poor and more likely African-American than white, find themselves cut off from sources of healthy food options.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/panelists-discuss-food-deserts-and-nutrition-access-in-urban-communities-jb1

    #1065153

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant
    #1065610

    News
    Participant

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