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Food Carts in Clintonville

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Dining Food Carts in Clintonville

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 87 total)
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  • #86993

    mazzyD
    Member

    With the growing number and variety of Food Carts in Columbus, some of them are finding their way to Clintonville.

    The chairman of the Clintonville Area Commission spoke to the papers this week to say he is concerned about the effect that food carts may have on the neighborhood.

    Mobile eateries concern CAC chairman

    http://www.thisweeknews.com/live/content/clintonville/stories/2011/06/15/mobile-eateries-concern-cac-chairman.html?sid=104

    “They can drain hundreds of dollars to thousands of dollars of the available food market,” DeFourny said. “These are low-rent coming and competing with the high-rent, higher-employee, fixed-building, and that’s one of the concerns.”

    Rad Dog and Ray-Ray’s Hog Pit are some of the better known carts in Clintonville. What other carts are already in the neighborhood? What would you like to see come to the neighborhood?

    Should Clintonville encourage more food carts or is the CAC on the path to limiting/banning food carts?

    #448565

    RBloodworth
    Participant

    *facepalm*

    The food trucks that have sprouted up in the past year are the most exciting dining development that Clintonville has had in ages, so- of course- the CAC wants to get rid of them. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.

    #448566

    joev
    Participant

    Clintonville: Home of the most conservative hippies in the world

    #448567
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I have to wonder how many of the customers at these food carts/trucks are coming from outside of the neighborhood? A lot of them have followings and fan bases that extend beyond the borders of Clintonville.

    So are the food carts/trucks really diverting dollars from their neighboring restaurants, or are they bringing in new dollars from outside the neighborhood?

    Follow up question: Does it really matter?

    #448568

    cbus11
    Member

    Jeez Louise, of course they want to squash the best thing that has come along in years.

    #448569

    meltsintowonder
    Participant

    As far as food is concerned, Ray Ray’s is what typically takes me to Clintonville, which means I’m more likely to spend other dollars in the area while I’m there. And we’re never thinking “Sage or Ray Ray’s tonight for dinner?” I know the circumstances can be different in other areas, but there aren’t as many options in Clintonville.

    #448570

    Mr. Wiggles
    Member

    The South Clintonville dining options are pretty slim. What do we have Dairy Queen? Glad Yankee Cajun opened up at the Crest. I hope DQ doesn’t go under.

    #448571

    bababoohi
    Member

    As a resident of CV, I don’t mind the food trucks b/c it’s mostly good food. I hit Ray-Ray’s probably once a month. Plus, for as many people as there are in Cville there is a shortage of resaurants.
    However, I can understand what he’s saying. The existing restaurants have made an investment in the community they serve. Resautrants are a part of a community while the food trucks come in a few days a week then go somewhere else. Also, any of them could pull out of Cville tomorrow and never come back. The CAC doesn’t have that concern about B&M restaurants.
    Don’t get me wrong, I’m not against the trucks, if you have a better mousetrap…But I can understand the CAC concern.
    The problem with Cville’s dining “scene” is still the limits on alcohol, not the food trucks.

    #448572

    bababoohi
    Member

    As a resident of CV, I don’t mind the food trucks b/c it’s mostly good food. I hit Ray-Ray’s probably once a month. Plus, for as many people as there are in Cville there is a shortage of resaurants.
    However, I can understand what he’s saying. The existing restaurants have made an investment in the community they serve. Resautrants are a part of a community while the food trucks come in a few days a week then go somewhere else. Also, any of them could pull out of Cville tomorrow and never come back. The CAC doesn’t have that concern about B&M restaurants.
    Don’t get me wrong, I’m not against the trucks, if you have a better mousetrap…But I can understand the CAC concern.
    The problem with Cville’s dining “scene” is still the limits on alcohol, not the food trucks.

    #448573

    10sun
    Member

    Just because someone follows a business model that limits flexibility does not mean that they need to be protected.

    #448574
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    10sun wrote >>
    Just because someone follows a business model that limits flexibility does not mean that they need to be protected.

    yes!

    #448575
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    The flexibility and low overhead is an advantage of the food carts / trucks.

    But as Jon Myers said in a similar discussion about the SNBA/FoodCarts, the brick and mortar restaurants have (or can have) better seats and tables, HVAC systems, bathrooms, patios, beer, wine, liquor, table service, cloth napkins and table cloths, and so on and so forth.

    They’re two completely different business models, each with advantages. It’s easy to point at a busy food card on a warm summer day and complain about how they’re stealing customers, but where are people going to go out to eat in December? Where are they going to go when they have small children and need high chairs? Where are they going to go when they’re on a nice date?

    People don’t eat from food carts 24/7. There’s room enough for everyone.

    #448576

    meltsintowonder
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>
    The flexibility and low overhead is an advantage of the food carts / trucks.
    But as Jon Myers said in a similar discussion about the SNBA/FoodCarts, the brick and mortar restaurants have (or can have) better seats and tables, HVAC systems, bathrooms, patios, beer, wine, liquor, table service, cloth napkins and table cloths, and so on and so forth.
    They’re two completely different business models, each with advantages. It’s easy to point at a busy food card on a warm summer day and complain about how they’re stealing customers, but where are people going to go out to eat in December? Where are they going to go when they have small children and need high chairs? Where are they going to go when they’re on a nice date?
    People don’t eat from food carts 24/7. There’s room enough for everyone.

    Exactly. And the more options you have, the more people will come. As someone mentioned, the area’s biggest issues are lack of liquor permitting and number of restaurants, so people in Clintonville have to go elsewhere. And competition is good for the consumer and the businesses in the end. It makes the businesses better or they can’t compete and exist.

    #448577

    cc
    Member

    I think Walker nailed it on the head.

    #448578

    bob.os
    Participant

    bababoohi wrote >>
    The problem with Cville’s dining “scene” is still the limits on alcohol, not the food trucks.

    How do you figure? There are three sites which were granted liquor permits quite a while back that are sitting empty. Northstar opened up recently on what was a long vacant lot that sat for years with a beer (and I think wine) license.

    Honestly, I think that most of Clintonville people just aren’t go-out-to-eat people.

    And +1 on Walker’s take.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 87 total)

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