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Westland Mall Redevelopment

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Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 114 total)
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  • #1031786

    Victor Ian Skwydde
    Participant

    No one really squeals over a lousy fried chicken joint the same as all over the city, do they?

    #1031790
    deathsquad420
    deathsquad420
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>deathsquad420 wrote:</div>
    it started when gangs took it over and the nail in the coffin was when they literally started shooting people in the mall. and police still didn’t do anything to kick them out.

    bullshit.

    funny enough, found this article from the other paper, quoted right here on CU. very clearly spells out the timeline of what happened. the new mall openings followed the shootings. tuttle didn’t even open until ’97. way before easton or polaris. city center was long dead by then. but you know, animated gifs are pretty good sources too. seems legit.

    http://www.columbusunderground.com/accidental-tenants-at-city-center

    City Center was the only place Columbus folks could go to get couture. Henri Bendel, Jacobson’s and dozens of smaller retailers lined three floors of glimmering marble corridors. And it didn’t matter that they were Downtown because the mall was engineered to make suburban shoppers feel safe within its protective shell.

    That notion was shattered in 1994, when a fatal shooting inside the mall made headlines. The timing couldn’t have been worse. In the decade that followed, Easton Town Center and the malls at Tuttle Crossing and Polaris sprang up, luring suburban shoppers back out to the burbs. City Center never recovered.

    #1031826
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    funny enough, found this article from the other paper, quoted right here on CU. very clearly spells out the timeline of what happened. the new mall openings followed the shootings. tuttle didn’t even open until ’97. way before easton or polaris. city center was long dead by then.

    You keep saying “shootings” (plural) but the citation you mentioned indicates that there was only one shooting. Though only one was enough for most people to hear about, and just the *perception* of crime/gang problems scared a lot of people away.

    I shopped at the City Center regularly during it’s final years (2003-2009) and never once did I feel unsafe in there. It was more empty than anything else. There was certainly no Mad Max style turf war antics that it sounds like you’re trying to describe. It was just… depressingly empty (like over 50% vacant stores and very little foot traffic). I guess I was more worried about zombies than anything else. ;)

    So, City Center may have been on a gradual downward trajectory post 1994, but it was the opening of the three brighter, shinier, newer malls (Tuttle, Easton, Polaris) that opened back-to-back-to-back in 1997, 1999 and 2001 that drove the City Center to empty out even faster. And when it comes to mall-shoppers, they’ll pick the brighter, shinier, newer option over the older and outdated one. Especially when all the stores are essentially the same (The Gap! J. Crew! Cinnabon!) from mall to mall to mall.

    Otherwise, if all it takes is a single shooting to shut a mall down, then Easton should have closed too, because there was a fatal shooting there in 2011:

    http://www.nbc4i.com/story/20746060/easton-shooting-leaves-questions-about-mall-safety

    Hell, Tuttle should have definitely closed after the Al-Qaida bombing plot in 2004:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5209103/ns/us_news-security/t/man-allegedly-al-qaida-plot-bomb-ohio-shopping-mall/

    The real reason Tuttle is still open? Because a newer shopping center hasn’t opened to replace it since 2001. When that happens, expect Tuttle to either be forced to complete a major renovation, or close within a decade. The average lifespan of a mall is 20-25 years, and Tuttle is going on 17 this year as the oldest of the big three.

    #1031829
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    It’s nice to think that the West Side or South Side deserves their own version, but the truth is that they would directly compete for the same types of stores and same types of shoppers as the others, and there’s really not a need for a fourth major shopping center of that sort in Central Ohio IMHO. The fact that the building of those three hurt or killed other centers (City Center was closed — Kingsdale, Worthington, Eastland, New Market and Lane Avenue all either suffered or were forced to refresh) says a lot about the regional capacity for mall-style brick-and-mortar shopping.

    Honestly, I think the demise of all of those locations was not the regional capacity. I mean yes, partially but mainly it was motivated by the “new, modern, successful” business models of Easton and Polaris. People still shopped there, its just retailers saw a better opportunity at Easton and Polaris, not because that’s where the customers were, because by your 30 miles theory those people would’ve be fine going to those retail locations, but because the space was fresh, modern and new and that has A LOT to do with retailers mindsets.

    Working in some retail and having corporate connections, I can tell you that sometimes they seem to love the idea of new space. Frankly, most of those locations were aging. Retailers wanted newer, fresh space to redesign their stores. Consumers simply followed due to the refreshed stores and mainly it being closer. I know a lot of people on this side of town who haven’t been to Easton/Polaris in months on time because its far away and Tuttle isn’t appealing because it itself is getting, ironically, “old” and the stores located there are not very desirable to the demographics of the Hilliard/Grove City/Galloway area. There is surely a retail opportunity on the west side.

    A new mall, such as the two outlet malls near Polaris, would fit perfectly at the location of Westland Mall. Even if a new mall was built, I could almost guarantee people would still go to Easton and Polaris. It’s a different type of retail attitude that would be tapped. Really, the only “big three” mall it would hurt would be Tuttle, but lets be realistic… that mall is the wrong design and needs a major overhaul. Tuttle had a death sentence long ago. Hopefully a developer will jump onto this.

    Even if you don’t agree with that assessment, point blank, Westland Mall needs something done with it. Heck even if it was demolished it’d be a celebration for the community.

    #1031838
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Even if you don’t agree with that assessment, point blank, Westland Mall needs something done with it.

    Totally agree. ;)

    #1031863

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    More hand-wringing over the loss of City Center. Downtown malls don’t work. It’s nothing unique or special to Columbus. They don’t work anywhere else either. The mall industry has known it for a long time, but they didn’t know it in the ’70s when planning began for City Center known at that time as the Capital South plan. In the ’70s there were no concerns whether a mall would make it or not.

    At that time, like one mall had closed, ever, and it was the one they smashed up in the Blues Brothers.

    #1031865
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    At that time, like one mall had closed, ever, and it was the one they smashed up in the Blues Brothers.

    Spike Jonze did it better. ;)

    #1032141
    Heathercat42
    Heathercat42
    Participant

    Okay, so I’m still new to the area itself so I’m not up to speed on what’s been discussed/covered/historically hypothesized on Westland. But I do know what I’ve seen in other cities with dead malls.
    Some were razed and rebuilt as hybrid indoor/outdoor shopping centers (Pompano Beach, FL is a good example), which works if you have the rest of the intersection/area in on a revitalization effort. Possible, since West Broad is nicely redone and you have the casino right there.
    I witnessed one(the old Grand Boulevard Mall in Jacksonville, FL) that as it was dying was bought by the local college and renovated mostly to offer classes as a satellite campus. Then once the final retail tenants were gone, it was turned into a full dedicated campus.

    Has anyone such as Columbus State looked into that kind of thing?

    #1032145
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Has anyone such as Columbus State looked into that kind of thing?

    Probably not going to be CSCC, as they launched their Delaware campus a few years ago as their second major campus location: http://www.cscc.edu/about/delaware/

    ITT Tech opened their Hilliard location inside an old big box store at Mill Run, so that’s not completely out of the question…

    http://www.itt-tech.edu/campus/school.cfm?lloc_num=22

    #1032214

    pez
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Heathercat42 wrote:</div>
    Has anyone such as Columbus State looked into that kind of thing?

    Probably not going to be CSCC, as they launched their Delaware campus a few years ago as their second major campus location: http://www.cscc.edu/about/delaware/

    ITT Tech opened their Hilliard location inside an old big box store at Mill Run, so that’s not completely out of the question…

    http://www.itt-tech.edu/campus/school.cfm?lloc_num=22

    Side tracking for a history quiz question….
    What was the name of the store that the ITT Tech building originally housed? bonus points if you can name the second, related store that was in there.

    #1032242
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    What was the name of the store that the ITT Tech building originally housed? bonus points if you can name the second, related store that was in there.

    I can’t recall what was in that building, but nearby where the Garden Ridge is now located was the home of Incredible Universe, one of the coolest stores of all time! ;)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incredible_Universe

    #1032268

    Twixlen
    Participant

    Actually, Columbus State did look at Westland as a satellite… oh, back in 2008ish. It was before the Macy’s had gone out, and the mall had officially been shuttered. Dan Stewart was our rep then, and he talked about it at one of the little neighborhood meetings we had.

    And yes. I actually squealed at Popeye’s fried chicken, because (as far as fast food chicken goes) it is as good as it gets. And the red beans and rice are good.

    #1032323

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    i remember the death of city center very clearly. it wasn’t because of any other mall or any street access store fronts. you had to park in a parking garage anyways. no one was on the streets. it started when gangs took it over and the nail in the coffin was when they literally started shooting people in the mall. and police still didn’t do anything to kick them out.

    funny enough, found this article from the other paper, quoted right here on CU. very clearly spells out the timeline of what happened. the new mall openings followed the shootings. tuttle didn’t even open until ’97. way before easton or polaris. city center was long dead by then.

    Until 1998, after Tuttle opened, City Center was the best performing mall in the metro, and one of the highest grossing malls in the entire country. There was no real competition, Columbus hadn’t had a new mall open in more than two decades.

    FWIW here are some real news articles, contemporaneous to what was happening at the time, which shed a little more light on the issue than either fictitious “shootings” or a cursory timeline written by some Other Paper intern well after the fact ever could,

    Since Columbus City Center opened in 1989 the mall has reigned as one of the region’s hottest destinations and continues to rank among the most profitable malls in the country. However, no one expects City Center to retain the title this year.

    City Center General Manager Peter Cooper concedes that business at the Downtown mall dropped sizably after Tuttle’s July opening. “We knew there was going to be some transfer of business, but that was to be expected,” Cooper said last week. “It would be wonderful to add a second super-regional shopping center and for there to be no falloff, but that’s not realistic.”

    While some observers predicted that Tuttle would cost City Center 8 percent to 10 percent of sales, Cooper said sales fell more than that. The number of City Center shoppers fell as much as 25 percent this summer and fall, and sales declined up to 20 percent, he said.

    – 11/27/1997

    Michael Glimcher, whose family is building the Fashion Mall at Polaris, promises all those cars with Delaware County tags won’t be in City Center’s garage in a few years. In words he’s likely to regret, he told the Columbus Metropolitan Club that suburban women will patronize his mall instead.

    They aren’t, he said, going to drive to some garage at an inner-city mall when they can drive down the street, turn the Volvo over to a valet and dash into Saks, he said.

    Columbus City Councilwoman Maryellen O’Shaughnessy, an urbanite, was not happy with the implication.

    “It would be a shame if Michael said something that would indicate they’re going to disrupt the commitment to Downtown.”

    – 01/28/2000

    Some call it a fortress, others a bunker. Whatever it’s called, Columbus City Center is ripe for an overhaul, many people say.

    Critics have said for years that City Center never has taken advantage of its location; that it essentially was a suburban mall plopped in the middle of a downtown. They say it should be opened to the streets and feature a livelier mix of retail, entertainment and restaurants.

    “City Center needs to be blown up,” developer Ron Pizzuti told a group of developers and brokers this week. “Not literally, but it needs to be opened up. It looks like a penitentiary. It was obsolete when it was built.”

    City Center, which dominated the shopping market for several years, has lost a great chunk of it to Easton, Polaris and Tuttle Crossing.

    “I’d guess that 75 to 80 percent of its market has evaporated because of the suburban malls,” said Columbus developer Don M. Casto III. “Can it survive as basically a suburban mall? The answer to that is clearly no.”

    – 01/17/2002

    Etc, etc, QED.

    #1032331
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    Pretty much sums it up.

    #1106221
    _calebross
    _calebross
    Participant

    EXCLUSIVE: Westland Mall declared a nuisance; officials discussing timetable for demolition
    Westland Mall is coming down. It’s just a matter of when.
    Dan Eaton
    Staff reporter
    Columbus Business First
    Dec 9, 2015, 1:08pm EST

    The Franklin Township Building Department has declared the 860,000-square-foot dormant mall a nuisance, and a Wednesday afternoon meeting between township officials and Plaza Properties Inc., the managing entity of the mall’s ownership group, will determine when it will be demolished.

    “The goal is to tear it down,” said Nick Vollman, Plaza Properties’ director of commercial leasing. “There’s no way to re-use it.”

    Vollman told me the mall – vandalized over the summer – has no electricity, heating or cooling. While that hasn’t been an issue yet, officials are concerned that with temperatures dropping the fire-suppression system could freeze. Sears Holdings Corp. (NASDAQ:SHLD) still operates a store at Westland even though the rest of the mall has been vacant for years.

    Weston Town Centre LLC owns 63 acres of the 81-acre site, with Sears owning the remaining 18.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2015/12/09/westland-mall-declared-a-nuisance-officials.html

    ——–

    Interesting that its not under Plaza Properties LLC and is now under Weston Town Centre LLC, does that mean they’re going forward with the Easton copycat? Also looks like Franklin Township is going to have to cover the cost of tearing it down, much similar to what Prairie Township did to about 400 (ish) apartments in the old Metro West area. And lastly, looks like we’ll have a redevelopment plan by Summer 2016.

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 114 total)

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