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Driverless Cars / Self-Driving Cars

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Driverless Cars / Self-Driving Cars

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 59 total)
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  • #95714

    Lu
    Participant

    I’ve been reading a lot about driverless cars recently and I’m now convinced that human-driven cars will eventually become a thing of the past. This is one of the few technologies that can, and will, utterly transform our lives in the next 10 – 15 years. Google’s driverless car has already traveled 300,000 accident-free miles, and Colorado is now joining California and Nevada in passing laws to make these cars street-legal.

    According to Forbes, each year, driverless cars can prevent 30,000 accident deaths, save 1.9 billion gallons of fuel, and save 4.8 billion hours of traffic congestion. I can’t think of another technology that comes close to this type of societal impact. The technology could drastically reduce the need to build freeway lanes. (And I also think it could significantly dilute the arguments for rail.)

    Incidentally, this is a nonpartisan technology that should make everyone happy. Democrats can enjoy the significant reductions in emissions, fuel consumption, and road construction. Republicans can appreciate the fact that the private sector is leading and investing in the technology, and that it doesn’t require massive government spending.

    Ohio should get ahead of the curve and promote innovation in driverless technology. America’s love affair with the car is long gone, largely because people find commuting to be a chore and would rather spend that time surfing the web or reading a book. Since Ohio’s economy is so closely linked to the auto industry, driverless technology could boost our economy while reducing congestion, pollution and accidents. As a symbolic start, Ohio should pass laws allowing driverless cars on our roads.

    #533480

    JonMyers
    Participant

    I agree in many respects, and can envision a future where driverless cars are part of the spectrum of transportation options.

    As with the introduction of any new technology the issue is how do you introduce it and drive the cost down as quickly as possible to spark wide spread adoption.

    What would be an interesting addition is some innovation in the economics of car (driverless) ownership itself. Maybe it looks like Zip car meets a city bike sharing system.

    What I’m getting at is that it appears there’s a trend towards rejecting the traditional economics and paradigm of car ownership. How do you spark innovation around this trend and encourage adoption of this technology?

    #533481
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    I just keep thinking about cars being hacked –or coming down with computer viruses. And imagine how dangerous a weaponized driverless car could be.

    Maybe it’s the Luddite in me, but this doesn’t sound great.

    #533482

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Chris, that’s a rational thought.

    An aside, most USB devices are suspect, I can’t imagine the opportunities for security holes and disruption that will exist around this technology.

    Then again, there’s another multi-billion dollar opportunity that could be created out of thin air. Security for networked personal vehicles and driverless cars.

    #533483

    Graybeak
    Participant

    I think we need to focus more on driverless light rail and Rapid Transit Buses.

    (Ah, so, that is a skunk poke.)

    #533484

    Jman4ever
    Participant

    ChrisSunami said:
    I just keep thinking about cars being hacked –or coming down with computer viruses. And imagine how dangerous a weaponized driverless car could be.

    Maybe it’s the Luddite in me, but this doesn’t sound great.

    I suppose at a significant level it could be disastrous, but consider that impaired people are already turning vehicles into weapons on a daily basis as is.

    #533485

    groundrules
    Participant

    i think i would trust a computer at least as much as I trust half the dipshit organisms I see piloting cars on my commute.

    #533486
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    Initially, and depending on the expense, most cars on the road would still be driver-controlled. Without widespread adoption of driverless cars, would we see the reduced-traffic benefit (and thus the reduced fuel consumption benefit)? Probably not.

    It would take almost full adoption for us to see benefit. Adoption rate would most likely depend on cost.

    While it sounds absolutely amazing, and would mean wonders for riders of these cars, I have to agree with the skunk-poker and underline the fact that many people would still prefer to live without cars altogether than to rely on a driverless car.

    But I have to agree with you, that this technology would benefit all of society and is a huge game changer and that Ohio should pass the law to allow driverless cars.

    Pretty excited to see how the future will change during our lifetimes.

    #533487

    geoyui
    Participant

    When I first heard of driverless cars, I wondered if they would have a manual and auto pilot functionality. Some people love to drive and be in control of the machine. Would a road filled with manual and auto piloted cars work? Would there be more road rage/speeding with the 2 styles of driving?

    I also think about the work that can be done, the naps that can be had and the stress that could be lowered during commutes in a driverless car. You could have more rested, happy employees. I hear about 1-2 hour nightmare commutes in SoCal/Chicago/DC and I laugh when I hear Columbus drivers waste 40 hours a year commuting.

    #533488

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    I would love for this technology to exist.

    However we are light years away from creating everything from the vehicles, computer grid, and roadway updates… not to mention the cost of updating every road in this country to handle this technology isn’t within reason.

    Yes, they are making great advancements in sensor pilotted vehicles, but every specialist/analyst that I’ve researched on the subject believes the only feasible option is actually creating a grid w/ vehicles programmed to follow within that grid. Otherwise the risk / possibilities for failure is extremely high.

    #533489
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Schoolboy said:
    I would love for this technology to exist.

    However we are light years away from creating everything from the vehicles, computer grid, and roadway updates… not to mention the cost of updating every road in this country to handle this technology isn’t within reason.

    Yes, they are making great advancements in sensor pilotted vehicles, but every specialist/analyst that I’ve researched on the subject believes the only feasible option is actually creating a grid w/ vehicles programmed to follow within that grid. Otherwise the risk / possibilities for failure is extremely high.

    ‘Way to take the wheel and drive us into the ground.

    #533490

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    It was an actual hobby of mine for the past 5 years. Have replaced it with less expensive and more practical hobbies such as gardening instead.

    #533491

    gramarye
    Participant

    I think that driverless cars are the way of the future, too (quite possibly driverless electric cars), but they’ll be phased in over a very long time. I think the promise is greatest in urban areas, since driverless cars are far less likely to do such things as misjudge the distance between cars or the speed of the car relative to the cars around it; modern technology is already fully capable of giving a computer the ability to constantly monitor such factors in 360 degrees in real time. Computers need not have a blind spot in mirrors the way human drivers do. They can be more constantly on the lookout for cyclists and pedestrians. They will not obliviously miss stop signs, red lights, and other signals; in addition, when a light turns green, a line of driverless cars can start simultaneously (as opposed to the current system in which each car at the front of the line will be moving for a second or two before the one behind it can start, which means that cars seven or eight cars back in the line will often have frustrating delays between when the light turns green and when they can actually move). So on and so forth.

    I’m still curious how they might work in rural areas, especially in areas with low-quality roads. I’m sure that those technological puzzles can be solved as well, but something makes me think it will take longer. Maybe I’ve got it completely backward, but I think those are stiffer challenges.

    As for the risks of deliberate sabotage, those may exist, but I don’t think those outweigh the benefits of the technology. And Google is not exactly a gaggle of complete dunces when it comes to computer security.

    #533492
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    Schoolboy said:
    I would love for this technology to exist.

    However we are light years away from creating everything from the vehicles, computer grid, and roadway updates

    Dude…they just 3D printed stem cells the other day. I think you drastically overestimate how long before we’ll see driverless cars introduced to our roadways in some smaller amounts, I’d say within 10 years personally.

    #533493

    kit444
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    I think that driverless cars are the way of the future, too (quite possibly driverless electric cars), but they’ll be phased in over a very long time.

    I agree. The biggest impediment will probably be sorting out all the liability issues. How many car manufacturers are going to jump into this without some waiver of liability, probably statutory, from every car accident?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 59 total)

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