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Downtown Retail - News & Updates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Downtown Retail – News & Updates

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 62 total)
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  • #450193

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    High St. dead zone a drag on Downtown retail
    By Mark Ferenchik
    The Columbus Dispatch
    Friday March 15, 2013 7:25 AM

    A cluster of three long-vacant buildings on N. High Street is familiar to Downtown workers and residents alike. You know the area — a faded Madison’s sign graces the front of the empty department store. Across the street, surface parking lots.

    “It’s such a prominent block,” said Kevin Wood, who has lived Downtown for nine years. Then again, he adds: “It’s an entirely dead block.”

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/03/15/dead-zone-a-drag-on-downtown-retail.html

    #450194

    Pablo
    Participant

    Here’s what used stand where the parking lot is now (west side of High between Gay and Long) (from the Library’s collection):

    #450195

    leftovers
    Member

    These buildings would require a lot of work to get them in shape enough to meet code and function for retail. It is surprising how cheap a lot of these downtown buildings are when they go up for sale. The reason is that the maintenance and utilities are $$$$$$$$, and they need to rent a lot more than the ground floor to make up for it.

    #450196

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    Pablo said:
    Here’s what used stand where the parking lot is now (west side of High between Gay and Long) (from the Library’s collection):

    This is an old photo of the East side of High, actually, not where the giant parking lot currently is. The vacant block in question is from where the street clock is all the way up to the white Modern Finance building at Gay/High.

    The Kay Jewelers building has been bulldozed, and the Penneys converted into those weird condos that don’t have any windows.

    #450197

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    You can get an idea of what used to stand on the West side from this photo taken in 1984,

    Full-sized Image

    The Huntington Center is under construction in the background.

    #450198

    Pablo
    Participant

    heresthecasey said:
    This is an old photo of the East side of High, actually, not where the giant parking lot currently is. The vacant block in question is from where the street clock is all the way up to the white Modern Finance building at Gay/High.

    The Kay Jewelers building has been bulldozed, and the Penneys converted into those weird condos that don’t have any windows.

    Oops – you’re right! Here’s the west side:

    #450199

    surber17
    Participant

    does the same group own the parking lot across the street?

    #450200

    Pablo
    Participant

    surber17 said:
    does the same group own the parking lot across the street?

    Looks like there are two different owners on the south half. According to the Auditor, Park National Bank owns the entire block between Long, High, Elm and Wall.

    #450201

    Graybeak
    Participant

    heresthecasey said:
    You can get an idea of what used to stand on the West side from this photo taken in 1984,

    Full-sized Image

    The Huntington Center is under construction in the background.

    Looks like the same Allright Parking sign is still in use as well.

    #450202
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    heresthecasey said:
    High St. dead zone a drag on Downtown retail
    By Mark Ferenchik
    The Columbus Dispatch
    Friday March 15, 2013 7:25 AM

    A cluster of three long-vacant buildings on N. High Street is familiar to Downtown workers and residents alike. You know the area — a faded Madison’s sign graces the front of the empty department store. Across the street, surface parking lots.

    This is a pretty pointless non-story.

    Vacant buildings remain vacant because landlord doesn’t give a shit. Residents would love to see something better. The End?

    #450203

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    Walker said:
    This is a pretty pointless non-story.

    Vacant buildings remain vacant because landlord doesn’t give a shit. Residents would love to see something better. The End?

    They did mention other cities putting minor penalties on vacant buildings so there is a little thought to it.

    A little in keeping with the what to do about parking lot threads.

    Should we tax parking lots to pay for transit?

    Regardless, it is nice to see Donnie is looking to put a House Wine in somewhere downtown. Too bad Gay St doesn’t have a spot that suites his needs.

    #450204

    InnerCore
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    They did mention other cities putting minor penalties on vacant buildings so there is a little thought to it.

    A little in keeping with the what to do about parking lot threads.
    https://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/should-we-tax-parking-lots-to-pay-for-transit/page/2

    Taxing empty lots to pay for transit is a decent ideal. Taxing vacant buildings for the sole purpose of trying to get people to sell them is a dumb idea.

    Example. A guy buys a building in 1995 for $150k. There isn’t much demand nor easy access to financing so he sits on the building. The building today is worth $300k. You start taxing the building to encourage the building owner to sell.

    Why on earth when anyone come along and buy it now. The original land owner probably has a very low basis to hold the property because he’s owned it for a while. A new land owner would have to come pay today’s price which is higher and still face the same challenges of low demand and no readily available financing. If the property can’t get developed with the lower land cost of the 1995 purchase it sure as hell isn’t going to get developed right after trading at today’s cost.

    The article reference cities like Chicago and DC. There people are holding for a completely different dynamic. You have situations where there is demand today but people are land banking for the future. Taking what they do and replicating it in an area with little demand makes absolutely no sense.

    If anything you need to go in the opposite direction and give the owners a break on taxes to improve their properties.

    #450205

    reelfreak
    Participant

    Huntington Center opened in 1984. The photograph above shows the building under construction, and it doesn’t even appear to have been topped out yet. Just thought I would point that out for any history purists.

    #450206

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    @Innercore

    You have a good point.

    #450207

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    Regardless, it is nice to see Donnie is looking to put a House Wine in somewhere downtown. Too bad Gay St doesn’t have a spot that suites his needs.

    Agreed, hope he gets a shot at one of the CDDC’s free rent spots, or can find another location to make it work. Would be a great addition to the area.

    reelfreak said:
    Huntington Center opened in 1984. The photograph above shows the building under construction, and it doesn’t even appear to have been topped out yet. Just thought I would point that out for any history purists.

    Ah, you are right. It’s probably from sometime in ’83 then and was just mislabeled.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 62 total)

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