Our City Online

Messageboard - Everyday Chit Chat

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Downtown Manhattan is DEAD at night

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Everyday Chit Chat Downtown Manhattan is DEAD at night

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 9 posts - 46 through 54 (of 54 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #296404

    HeySquare
    Participant

    gk wrote >>

    HeySquare wrote >>
    As gk is doing in this thread.
    PS… and Walker really just wants to have a thread about this so anytime anyone says the CBD of Columbus is dead, he can just throw this thread trump.

    I think that part of the frustration is that other cities are making major investments in their central business districts to attract residents, tourists and those living in the metropolitan area and though Columbus has made some significant investments in its central business district in the past few years, it is not nearly at the pace and magnitude of other comparable cities. The following link provides just one example.
    http://www.clevelandmap.com/why-cleveland/

    Alrighty… I took a look at this little promotional piece.

    And before I comment, I want to state, for the record, that I think Cleveland is a cool city, and all of these investments are positive steps.

    However… I question how you come to the conclusion that “other cities” are making an investment that Columbus is not. Are you talking about Columbus city government? business leaders?

    Cleveland does have major investment from the medical industry happening. This medical mart, and multiple improvements to the hospital campus there. I will say though, that Nationwide Children’s Hospital is making significant investment in Columbus at their campus at Livingston and Parsons, and I suspect that may anchor some new development in the area. Advantage Cleveland, but not a complete win.

    Cleveland is a hub for Continental, so it’s cool that they get a non-stop flight to Paris, and a new control tower. Columbus airport has been doing some reorganizing and expansion too. We lost Skybus, but did keep NetJets though, but we’ll give that one to Cleveland. (although I don’t necessarily consider a bigger busier airport a plus, cause I love the convenience of the airport at CMH). I’m really not sure that’s a win for Cleveland, since it’s cheaper to fly out of Columbus.

    There was one hotel (Hotel Indigo) which was cited twice in that list, in the Flats. OK… Columbus has rumors of a new boutique hotel, but no movement yet. The new hotel on Gay Street opened last year, but it’s not a boutique hotel so, we’ll call that advantage Cleveland.

    Convention center upgrade… well Columbus Convention Center is fine as it is, and there are some renovations going on, so I think that’s a win for Columbus, since our gov’t isn’t spending on that. Draw.

    I think the record for Columbus downtown housing can compete with Cleveland: Seneca project (11 story new apartment), the condos as Gay and Third, the new townhouses on Gay, the new stuff in RiverSouth near the courthouse, and since they are including the Flats in their announcements, I think we could probably throw in the Jackson. Even without Ibiza, I think those developments are more than comparable to the mixed use and residential developed in Cleveland. Draw.

    Columbus: new courthouse. Win Columbus.

    Columbus: new ballfield. Win Columbus.

    Both cities have museum expansions going on… but that’s gotta be a win for Cleveland. They do have a kickin’ museum.

    Columbus: new Riverwalk park. Win Columbus

    Columbus: new Main Street bridge. Win Columbus (whenever it gets finished)

    Cleveland: new bus rapid transit line. Win Cleveland.

    Ok, I think that’s it for me. So if a non-stop to Paris, a bus rapid transit line, and more impressionist paintings tips the scale for you, then I guess that’s your choice, but I don’t see a whole heck of a lot of difference in some of the other items. I’ll just grab a hot dog at Dirty Franks or go to a ballgame.

    #296405

    gk
    Member

    However… I question how you come to the conclusion that “other cities” are making an investment that Columbus is not. Are you talking about Columbus city government? business leaders?

    I specifically recognize in my post that Columbus (government and private developers) has made some significant investments in its central business district over the past few years, but not at the same pace or magnitude (sheer number of investment dollars) as other comparable cities. These other cities just seem further along than Columbus in the process of revitalizing their central business districts either because they got started earlier or they have invested more money. Getting back to the original topic at hand I do believe that we can and should have a vibrant downtown between Nationwide and Mound Streets if the commitment from the powers that be (government and private) and investment is made to make it happen. It does not help, however, when Nationwide chooses to invest in Grandview Yard rather than Columbus Commons (the proposed mix-use retail, residential, commercial space on the demolished City Center site) where we could once again begin drawing residents and tourists to our downtown. To me, it just further delays the revitalization of our downtown.

    #296406

    JonMyers
    Participant

    If we want to be innovative and compare ourselves to New York the one area we could compete on is the speed and efficiency of supporting business. We need a huge reality check in that area.

    I talk to business owners around Columbus day in and out. I can tell you the biggest obstacle to the growth and success of downtown is the city itself. In particular how we handle revenue generation downtown, licensing and permitting. Taxes and taxation never come up. Again, it’s the shitty “I’m doing you a favor” mentality of licensing and permitting that have zero concept of customer service. Archaic, timely processes to obtain permits and licenses and lastly, sniffin around at the meters and on the premises of businesses to issue fines like a crack head scratchin around for some change to keep the addiction going.

    #296407

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>
    Again, it’s the shitty “I’m doing you a favor” mentality of licensing and permitting that have zero concept of customer service. Archaic, timely processes to obtain permits and licenses and lastly, sniffin around at the meters and on the premises of businesses to issue fines like a crack head scratchin around for some change to keep the addiction going.

    Oh man.. I don’t deal with many business owners, but I have hears this from the ones I do know.. Many know how to “play the game” as it were, but they shouldn’t have to…

    A streamlined permit and licensing bureau within the city would be a good thing…

    #296408
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    I agree with Walker on certain points. Just got back from Chicago last weekend and even during Lollapalooza I noticed many “dead” areas at night in many parts of town. We stayed overlooking Grant Park along Michigan Avenue, which is fairly centrally located and we searched many “dead” blocks for a place to eat or hang out. It’s all the same everywhere. It’s all about scale. Sure NYC and Chicago will have more vibrant areas, they are bigger cities. They will also have more dead areas. Streets are vibrant at night mainly in bar or restaurant districts. Those are the only places open that late. Our downtown right now probably cannot support another district so let’s make the districts we have bigger by expanding a block or two. There, more vibrant streets at night. There are a ton of emply lots in the Arena District.

    I sure wish the brewery district would come back. They should have built Crew stadium down there. That would have done the trick. Add in a little Shadowbox, the rest follows, new district, more vibrant streets after dark.

    gk: Thank you. It’s nice to know I’m not the only one who thinks Columbus is moving too slow on urban development compared with most cities, even though we have alot going on. It’s still too slow in this fast paced and competitive world.

    #296409
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    gk wrote >>
    It does not help, however, when Nationwide chooses to invest in Grandview Yard rather than Columbus Commons (the proposed mix-use retail, residential, commercial space on the demolished City Center site) where we could once again begin drawing residents and tourists to our downtown. To me, it just further delays the revitalization of our downtown.

    Could not agree more.

    #296410

    ja
    Member

    jpizzow wrote >>
    I agree with Walker on certain points. Just got back from Chicago last weekend and even during Lollapalooza I noticed many “dead” areas at night in many parts of town. We stayed overlooking Grant Park along Michigan Avenue, which is fairly centrally located and we searched many “dead” blocks for a place to eat or hang out. It’s all the same everywhere. It’s all about scale. Sure NYC and Chicago will have more vibrant areas, they are bigger cities. They will also have more dead areas. Streets are vibrant at night mainly in bar or restaurant districts. Those are the only places open that late. Our downtown right now probably cannot support another district so let’s make the districts we have bigger by expanding a block or two. There, more vibrant streets at night. There are a ton of emply lots in the Arena District.
    I sure wish the brewery district would come back. They should have built Crew stadium down there. That would have done the trick. Add in a little Shadowbox, the rest follows, new district, more vibrant streets after dark.
    gk: Thank you. It’s nice to know I’m not the only one who thinks Columbus is moving too slow on urban development compared with most cities, even though we have alot going on. It’s still too slow in this fast paced and competitive world.

    I couldn’t agree with you more. Perceptions become individuals’ reality, irrespective of promotional efforts and all the cheerleading in the world. Walking pass empty store fronts to german village or the happening short north does not give one the sense of a vibrant downtown. And let’s be honest with ourselves, most people are going to consider our downtown as being between Nationwide and Fulton Streets – where the major downtown hotels and high rises exist. In fact, like HeySquare in NYC, they are likely to feel uncomfortable or perplexed by the lack of people on the streets at night and weekends. I know from personal experience when tourists would stop me downtown, particularly on weekends or after work hours, and ask me where all the people were. Of course, I would direct them to the Short North. When asked where they can shop, the concierges at the major hotels direct them to Easton – a 20 minute cab ride to what in most cities would be considered the suburbs.

    #296411

    Tenzo
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>
    ^Thanks. ;)

    Tenzo wrote >>

    ZHC wrote >>
    This reinforces my point that I’ve been harping at for a number of years. No major US city I’ve ever been to has a tremendous amount of housing right in the center of their CBD

    Chicago

    According to the 2000 Census, 16,388 people live within the Chicago Loop. Not an insignificant number, but hardly what I think ZHC was referring to with “a tremendous amount of housing”.
    Anyway, with a size of 1.5 square miles, that means the residential population of the Loop is 10,372 people per square mile, which if counted as a separate city would rank it as the 115th most densely populated city in the US in between Hackensack, New Jersey and Upper Darby, PA.
    Of course, as already pointed out a dozen times, a large business district can also contain smaller entertainment districts that keep the area more lively after the business day concludes, but I do think there is still a valid point that many business districts do not have large residential populations. Even in larger cities they’re not quite as mixed use as we’d love to see Downtown Columbus become.

    I thought we were talking about wether there was activity in the city or not. Chicago’s theater district is well inside the loop. And Mellenium park (which has a visiting population of about 3.5 million during taste of Chicago, or hundreds of thousands when I was there a couple of weeks ago.)

    #296412
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    There’s been some discussion mixed in about entertainment districts, but the original point of the conversation was a discussion about housing and residents living in CBDs.

Viewing 9 posts - 46 through 54 (of 54 total)

The forum ‘Everyday Chit Chat’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: