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Downtown Manhattan is DEAD at night

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Everyday Chit Chat Downtown Manhattan is DEAD at night

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  • #296389

    gk
    Member

    I believe Walker has conceded the point that Manhattan is NOT dead at night! Give him a break.

    #296390
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    ^Thanks. ;)

    Tenzo wrote >>

    ZHC wrote >>
    This reinforces my point that I’ve been harping at for a number of years. No major US city I’ve ever been to has a tremendous amount of housing right in the center of their CBD

    Chicago

    According to the 2000 Census, 16,388 people live within the Chicago Loop. Not an insignificant number, but hardly what I think ZHC was referring to with “a tremendous amount of housing”.

    Anyway, with a size of 1.5 square miles, that means the residential population of the Loop is 10,372 people per square mile, which if counted as a separate city would rank it as the 115th most densely populated city in the US in between Hackensack, New Jersey and Upper Darby, PA.

    Of course, as already pointed out a dozen times, a large business district can also contain smaller entertainment districts that keep the area more lively after the business day concludes, but I do think there is still a valid point that many business districts do not have large residential populations. Even in larger cities they’re not quite as mixed use as we’d love to see Downtown Columbus become.

    #296391

    HeySquare
    Participant

    gk wrote >>
    I believe Walker has conceded the point that Manhattan is NOT dead at night! Give him a break.

    I don’t think anyone has conceded anything. I certainly would agree with the assertion that the financial district is pretty dead at night. I used to get lost in that area a lot(the streets are wicked convoluted there), and it clears out after work. And depending on where you are in midtown, that area can be barren too. If you don’t know where the concentrations of nightlife are, it can be a very big city. (I remember having to eat at a TGI Friday’s once, cause it was the only thing we found open one Sunday evening.)

    So really I think the answer depends on where in Manhattan you are talking about. And what you are planning on doing. And when you are planning on doing it. Even areas that are vibrant during the day can be frightening at night when all the metal security roller doors are rolled down in front of the storefronts.

    #296392

    gk
    Member

    HeySquare wrote >>

    gk wrote >>
    I believe Walker has conceded the point that Manhattan is NOT dead at night! Give him a break.

    I don’t think anyone has conceded anything. I certainly would agree with the assertion that the financial district is pretty dead at night. I used to get lost in that area a lot(the streets are wicked convoluted there), and it clears out after work. And depending on where you are in midtown, that area can be barren too. If you don’t know where the concentrations of nightlife are, it can be a very big city. (I remember having to eat at a TGI Friday’s once, cause it was the only thing we found open one Sunday evening.)
    So really I think the answer depends on where in Manhattan you are talking about. And what you are planning on doing. And when you are planning on doing it. Even areas that are vibrant during the day can be frightening at night when all the metal security roller doors are rolled down in front of the storefronts.

    I simply had in mind Soho, LIttle Italy, Chelsea, Tribecca, Greenwich Village, East Village, Times Square, Hells Kitchen, Upper West Side, Upper East Side, Gramercy Park, NOLITA – all of which are in Manhattan – that attract not only residents but also thousands of tourists. Manhattan attracts 47 million tourists each year, making it the number one tourist destination in the United States for those abroad as well as those who live in the states.

    #296393
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    And I thought we were talking about the business districts found in the financial district downtown and midtown area?

    #296394

    HeySquare
    Participant

    I thought Walkers original post was to point out that even in Manhattan, there are areas of the city that become deserted at night. By doing so, he is drawing a comparison to Columbus… where some of the criticism of the downtown area has been aimed at how dead certain areas are at night.

    Somer and I both agree that based on our real life experiences, that seems true.

    I will concede that the term “downtown” could confuse things, since when applied to NYC, it actually indicates a specific geographic area, one that does not solely correspond with the financial district. But since you included times square, hells kitchen, and the upper west and east sides into your post, I suspect you were not using this as a distinction.

    #296395

    gk
    Member

    Walker wrote >>
    And I thought we were talking about the business districts found in the financial district downtown and midtown area?

    I believe the central business district is considered generally as anything below 59th Street, with Wall Street being at the southern tip of Manhattan.

    #296396

    HeySquare
    Participant

    Not really.

    Midtown ends at 59th… runs south to… oh 14th-ish.
    Downtown is technically 14th to Battery Park (or thereabouts… sometimes the geography floats a little) The Financial district is considered downtown. and is, I think, generally accepted to be seperate from the Midtown business district.

    #296397

    gk
    Member

    HeySquare wrote >>
    Not really.
    Midtown ends at 59th… runs south to… oh 14th-ish.
    Downtown is technically 14th to Battery Park (or thereabouts… sometimes the geography floats a little) The Financial district is considered downtown. and is, I think, generally accepted to be seperate from the Midtown business district.

    However you wish to define it and there are varying definitions depending on whom you talk to, it still includes Greenwich Village, Tribecca, Little Italy, Chinatown, East Village, SOHO, NOHO, and nolita which tend to attract many residents and tourists alike, not to mention the students of New York University.

    #296398

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Downtown Manhattan is DEAD at night

    Assuming you mean the financial district, Battery Park and parts of Tribeca, etc.. It’s always been that way. What’s the big revelation? I’m missing what point is trying to be made here.

    #296399
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    JonMyers wrote >>
    It’s always been that way. What’s the big revelation? I’m missing what point is trying to be made here.

    Just a simple comparison for the regular complaints about Broad & High being lifeless outside of the 9-to-5.

    And yes, comparing any city to NYC is always apples to oranges. It just seems like many who complain about the Central Business District in Columbus want to compare it to either Entertainment, Residential, or Mixed Use Districts in NYC or elsewhere, and not to their own 9-to-5 CBDs.

    #296400

    HeySquare
    Participant

    As gk is doing in this thread.

    PS… and Walker really just wants to have a thread about this so anytime anyone says the CBD of Columbus is dead, he can just throw this thread trump.

    #296401
    SJT
    SJT
    Participant

    NYC is not a good example, sure, but I completely get Walker’s point. I remember years ago being in DT Atlanta& hearing crickets& trying to figure out which direction to go to eat since our hotel was downtown. I also remember being in other large cities (SanFran for one) where the bars [email protected] 1am. I thought it funny bc people kept making fun of me bc I was from Columbus& asking if I lived on a farm. So, yes it really is pretty common for even “larger” cities to have a dead downtown/business district at night& weekends.

    #296402

    gk
    Member

    HeySquare wrote >>
    As gk is doing in this thread.
    PS… and Walker really just wants to have a thread about this so anytime anyone says the CBD of Columbus is dead, he can just throw this thread trump.

    I think that part of the frustration is that other cities are making major investments in their central business districts to attract residents, tourists and those living in the metropolitan area and though Columbus has made some significant investments in its central business district in the past few years, it is not nearly at the pace and magnitude of other comparable cities. The following link provides just one example.

    http://www.clevelandmap.com/why-cleveland/

    #296403

    Bear
    Participant

    HeySquare wrote >>
    I thought Walkers original post was to point out that even in Manhattan, there are areas of the city that become deserted at night. By doing so, he is drawing a comparison to Columbus… where some of the criticism of the downtown area has been aimed at how dead certain areas are at night.
    Somer and I both agree that based on our real life experiences, that seems true.

    And to be clear, that map doesn’t disprove Walker’s point, either… the data just don’t speak to it one way or the other.

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