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Detroit - Smaller Than Columbus?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Detroit – Smaller Than Columbus?

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  • #85855

    drew
    Participant

    From the Detroit Free Press:

    Quote:
    Detroit’s population plunged 25% in the past decade to 713,777, the lowest count since 1910, four years before Henry Ford offered $5 a day to autoworkers, sparking a boom that quadrupled Detroit’s size in the first half of the 20th Century.

    and:

    Quote:
    Detroit, once America’s fourth most populous city, will fall below Midwestern neighbors like Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Ind. as well as southern cities like Jacksonville, Fla., Charlotte, N.C., and Austin and Fort Worth, Texas.

    Given the declining populations in Cleveland and Cinci as well, we seem to be doing exceptionally well by comparison.

    #434596

    RoundTowner
    Member

    drew wrote >>
    From the Detroit Free Press:

    Detroit’s population plunged 25% in the past decade to 713,777, the lowest count since 1910, four years before Henry Ford offered $5 a day to autoworkers, sparking a boom that quadrupled Detroit’s size in the first half of the 20th Century.

    and:

    [b]Detroit, once America’s fourth most populous city, will fall below Midwestern neighbors like Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Ind.[/b] as well as southern cities like Jacksonville, Fla., Charlotte, N.C., and Austin and Fort Worth, Texas.

    Given the declining populations in Cleveland and Cinci as well, we seem to be doing exceptionally well by comparison.

    See the docu-video of Detroit vs Hiroshima on youtube. Detroit, How 65 years of Democrat/Union policies have destroyed what was once Americas wealthest city. I wonder if the same could be said about Cleveland and Cincy.

    #434597

    DavidF
    Participant

    RoundTowner wrote >>

    drew wrote >>
    From the Detroit Free Press:

    Detroit’s population plunged 25% in the past decade to 713,777, the lowest count since 1910, four years before Henry Ford offered $5 a day to autoworkers, sparking a boom that quadrupled Detroit’s size in the first half of the 20th Century.

    and:

    [b]Detroit, once America’s fourth most populous city, will fall below Midwestern neighbors like Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Ind.[/b] as well as southern cities like Jacksonville, Fla., Charlotte, N.C., and Austin and Fort Worth, Texas.

    Given the declining populations in Cleveland and Cinci as well, we seem to be doing exceptionally well by comparison.

    See the docu-video of Detroit vs Hiroshima on youtube. Detroit, How 65 years of Democrat/Union policies have destroyed what was once Americas wealthest city. I wonder if the same could be said about Cleveland and Cincy.

    Yep. That’s the only possible reason. Don’t let any pesky things like facts get in your way.

    #434598

    joev
    Participant

    Interesting. The metro area of Detroit is still three times larger than the metro area of Columbus. Like the metro areas of Cincinnati and Cleveland, Detroit’s metro hasn’t seen a ton of population loss – people have just shifted from the city to the burbs.

    #434599

    DavidF
    Participant

    joev wrote >>
    Interesting. The metro area of Detroit is still three times larger than the metro area of Columbus. Like the metro areas of Cincinnati and Cleveland, Detroit’s metro hasn’t seen a ton of population loss – people have just shifted from the city to the burbs.

    Whaaaa? That doesn’t sound socialist at all!

    #434600

    berdawn
    Member

    RoundTowner wrote >>

    drew wrote >>
    From the Detroit Free Press:

    Detroit’s population plunged 25% in the past decade to 713,777, the lowest count since 1910, four years before Henry Ford offered $5 a day to autoworkers, sparking a boom that quadrupled Detroit’s size in the first half of the 20th Century.

    and:

    [b]Detroit, once America’s fourth most populous city, will fall below Midwestern neighbors like Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Ind.[/b] as well as southern cities like Jacksonville, Fla., Charlotte, N.C., and Austin and Fort Worth, Texas.

    Given the declining populations in Cleveland and Cinci as well, we seem to be doing exceptionally well by comparison.

    See the docu-video of Detroit vs Hiroshima on youtube. Detroit, How 65 years of Democrat/Union policies have destroyed what was once Americas wealthest city. I wonder if the same could be said about Cleveland and Cincy.

    if you can’t use adjectives properly, maybe you shouldn’t type in public?

    #434601

    joev
    Participant

    Right. Detroit does still have some of the country’s wealthiest suburbs, though.

    #434602

    Mercurius
    Participant

    joev wrote >>
    Interesting. The metro area of Detroit is still three times larger than the metro area of Columbus. Like the metro areas of Cincinnati and Cleveland, Detroit’s metro hasn’t seen a ton of population loss – people have just shifted from the city to the burbs.

    That’s not really true either. While their metro area is much larger, it too has been consistently loosing population. If trends from the last decade continue another decade, Columbus will be the largest metro area and city in Ohio. Detroit’s metro area will further shrink.

    #434603

    drew
    Participant

    I wouldn’t entirely write off the idea that Democrat politicians have had something to do with Detroit’s current woes. And, similarly, I’d be quick to note that Dem politicians have had more than a little to do with Columbus’s successes.

    I gather that it can be irresistible to categorize using only the crudest of political generalizations (Dems vs Republicans, libs vs cons, CAGE MATCH! ONLY ONE WILL COME OUT ALIVE!!!!1!11!), but might the above observation work as an object lesson for why one should nonetheless resist temptation?

    #434604

    Antonio
    Member

    joev wrote >>
    Interesting. The metro area of Detroit is still three times larger than the metro area of Columbus. Like the metro areas of Cincinnati and Cleveland, Detroit’s metro hasn’t seen a ton of population loss – people have just shifted from the city to the burbs.

    It’s true, it stretches nearly 60 miles to the west, 40 miles to the south, 40 miles to north and to the water edge on the east.

    Nobody in their right mind wants to live in Detroit.

    Columbus has small pockets like this, but nothing like Detroit is.

    #434605

    DavidF
    Participant

    drew wrote >>
    I wouldn’t entirely write off the idea that Democrat politicians have had something to do with Detroit’s current woes. And, similarly, I’d be quick to note that Dem politicians have had more than a little to do with Columbus’s successes.
    I gather that it can be irresistible to categorize using only the crudest of political generalizations (Dems vs Republicans, libs vs cons, CAGE MATCH! ONLY ONE WILL COME OUT ALIVE!!!!1!11!), but might the above observation work as an object lesson for why one should nonetheless resist temptation?

    If you insist, but it takes all the fun out of blaming Democrats and Unions for everything.

    #434606

    Pablo
    Participant

    Unions have made concessions in recent years, probably not enough in management’s eyes. This is the same management with a business model that assumed low gas prices would last forever and continually fought CAFE and safety standards and sold Chevy Vegas and Ford Pintos to an unsuspecting public in the 1970s.

    Merrill Lynch and Bear Stearns didn’t have unionized workers so they really should still be in existence and profitable, right?

    #434607
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    RoundTowner wrote >>

    drew wrote >>
    From the Detroit Free Press:

    Detroit’s population plunged 25% in the past decade to 713,777, the lowest count since 1910, four years before Henry Ford offered $5 a day to autoworkers, sparking a boom that quadrupled Detroit’s size in the first half of the 20th Century.

    and:

    [b]Detroit, once America’s fourth most populous city, will fall below Midwestern neighbors like Columbus, Ohio and Indianapolis, Ind.[/b] as well as southern cities like Jacksonville, Fla., Charlotte, N.C., and Austin and Fort Worth, Texas.

    Given the declining populations in Cleveland and Cinci as well, we seem to be doing exceptionally well by comparison.

    See the docu-video of Detroit vs Hiroshima on youtube. Detroit, How 65 years of Democrat/Union policies have destroyed what was once Americas wealthest city. I wonder if the same could be said about Cleveland and Cincy.

    No doubt that UAW, along with management incompetence, did serious damage to Detroit.

    Just from a quick google:
    http://www.concordmonitor.com/article/how-detroit-destroyed-itself

    But I’d suggest that it wasn’t only the UAW. There’s enough derp to go around for everyone.

    #434608

    econJoe
    Participant

    Detroit is actually a good example of what happens when you hollow out the central city by facilitating sprawl (i.e., building more highways to make it easier to live less densely). In fact, if we were to be totally “capitalist” about housing lifestyles, the central city would definitely win. Think about it: you can maximize the gains to property ownership by extracting as much profit as possible from a parcel of land by building as much on it as possible. But when the government subsidizes automobile transportation (and when in the past it provided mortgages on new homes only to veterans after WWII), it becomes cheaper to build on green fields. To put it in a modern context, think about how much less successful New Albany would be if 161 hadn’t been upgraded to its current highway status with government funds.

    I’m just saying.

    #434609

    DavidF
    Participant

    Pablo wrote >>
    Unions have made concessions in recent years, probably not enough in management’s eyes. This is the same management with a business model that assumed low gas prices would last forever and continually fought CAFE and safety standards and sold Chevy Vegas and Ford Pintos to an unsuspecting public in the 1970s.
    Merrill Lynch, Bear Stearns and AIG didn’t have unionized workers so they really should still be in existence and profitable, right?

    I’m sure the unions foisted the Pinto onto management on behalf of their Democratic overlords. Most likely at the behest of the Illuminati.

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