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Creating Hipsturbia (The Hipster Suburbs)

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Creating Hipsturbia (The Hipster Suburbs)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 52 total)
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  • #95949

    News
    Participant

    Creating Hipsturbia

    Ryan Inzana

    By ALEX WILLIAMS

    Published: February 15, 2013

    A yoga studio opened on Main Street that offers lunch-hour vinyasa classes. Nearby is a bicycle store that sells Dutch-style bikes, and a farm-to-table restaurant that sources its edible nasturtiums from its backyard garden.

    READ MORE: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/17/fashion/creating-hipsturbia-in-the-suburbs-of-new-york.html?pagewanted=all&_r=2&

    #534535

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    I found this to be a bit depressing.

    #534536
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Why’s that?

    #534537

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    It reads like a lot of people settling and trying to convince themselves this is what they want. It is just what I am reading into it. It also reinforces the stereotype that as you get older you head out to the burbs…

    There was even space for a basement rec room. And it was only a 40-minute drive to his Brooklyn studio.

    #534538

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    I have to add, that as I have gotten older I have somewhat tired of the Arena District, but I do not think this is what the article is about.

    #534539

    mcoleman2
    Member

    I read this article on Sunday. We are so lucky to live in a Columbus where we don’t have to leave an area we love because we cannot afford to stay. Also, creating a vibrant community with coffee shops, bakeries, yoga studios, arts, etc serves everyone involved: the residents get the services they need, the merchants have customers, this increases employment and creates a stable environment. I feel that labeling the area “hipster” can sometimes increase interest in the area. Having spent time in the areas addressed in the articles (I grew up in the Hudson Valley in NY) – I loved (and still do) that “little” town community feeling – it helps us to feel more connected to others.

    #534540

    InnerCore
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    It reads like a lot of people settling and trying to convince themselves this is what they want. It is just what I am reading into it. It also reinforces the stereotype that as you get older you head out to the burbs…

    There was even space for a basement rec room. And it was only a 40-minute drive to his Brooklyn studio.

    I really didn’t read it that way. At the end of the day due to price, schools, space, etc. the inner cities aren’t going to be for everyone. But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t aspects of urban living that people still want. It seems people are saying if we are going to move to the suburbs then the suburbs have to at least offer some of the lifestyle options that we want.

    I really like the SN area. But the reality is that there are more people who want to be there than spaces for them to live. This is going to continue to drive up pricing. Especially considering were really not building much dense product. You already see it on this forum where people are hoping they’ll provide affordable options.

    As the pricing goes higher many people are going to be forced into a decision. Either move into a smaller and less quality unit or leave. Since other areas are providing at least some of the lifestyle options they want along with better living conditions some people are choosing to leave.

    I think its better to have these options in the area instead of putting people in a position where they feel they need to leave the area altogether.

    #534541

    Mister Shifter
    Participant

    The response type that everyone who moves to the suburbs are “settling” tends to irk me. People and families have different wants, needs & desires. What you may find attractive may not be so for the next person.

    #534542
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Mister Shifter said:
    The response type that everyone who moves to the suburbs are “settling” tends to irk me. People and families have different wants, needs & desires. What you may find attractive may not be so for the next person.

    settler!

    #534543
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    mrpoppinzs said:
    It reads like a lot of people settling and trying to convince themselves this is what they want. It is just what I am reading into it. It also reinforces the stereotype that as you get older you head out to the burbs…

    “The Suburbs” get a bad rap because many of them have historically been made up of bland mass produced housing developments, bland strip malls full of chain stores, and depressing landscapes composed of wide roads, endless parking lots, and emotionless drive-thrus. (Of course, not all suburbs are the same, and many are much nicer than the stereotype.)

    This article is sort of presenting the idea that the suburbs can change to adapt to people who want to live there and want more out of their surroundings. Better looking homes, bike lanes and sidewalks, local boutiques, independent restaurants, etc.

    And that’s a *GOOD* thing.

    Because it’s not like any of this detracts from the inner city neighborhoods at all. I’m thrilled that it seems like we’ve seen an uptick in new local restaurants and shops and destinations sprouting up across Dublin, Gahanna, Hilliard and elsewhere. The more our region takes this shape, the better off we’ll all be.

    #534544

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Walker said:
    “The Suburbs” get a bad rap because many of them have historically been made up of bland mass produced housing developments, bland strip malls full of chain stores, and depressing landscapes composed of wide roads, endless parking lots, and emotionless drive-thrus. (Of course, not all suburbs are the same, and many are much nicer than the stereotype.)

    This article is sort of presenting the idea that the suburbs can change to adapt to people who want to live there and want more out of their surroundings. Better looking homes, bike lanes and sidewalks, local boutiques, independent restaurants, etc.

    And that’s a *GOOD* thing.

    Because it’s not like any of this detracts from the inner city neighborhoods at all. I’m thrilled that it seems like we’ve seen an uptick in new local restaurants and shops and destinations sprouting up across Dublin, Gahanna, Hilliard and elsewhere. The more our region takes this shape, the better off we’ll all be.

    Agreed. I’m probably one of the biggest proponents for the inner cities. But the fact remains that most people are still moving to the suburbs. Delaware remains the fastest growing county in the Columbus MSA. Were not going to be able to out “downtown” many of these other cities so making these places desirable is where we are going to compete the most.

    #534545

    News
    Participant

    Flight of the Hipsters
    02/19/2013 10:50am
    ARIELLA COHEN | NEXT CITY

    I am not the first to observe that it isn’t news that young adults with children— some of whom may have tattoos and enjoy yoga, loud music and whimsically named cocktails —sometimes leave their expensive, small apartments in the city for larger homes in the suburbs. Obviously, this has been going on, well, since the suburbs were created to cater to young adults with children who wanted to leave small and expensive apartments in the city for larger homes in the suburbs.

    READ MORE: http://nextcity.org/daily/entry/flight-of-the-hipsters

    #534546

    mellotron
    Participant

    For what it’s worth, if you take the literal quotes from the people in the NYTimes, you have to scale them to Columbus. While the process of Manhattanizing Brooklyn, for example, is the same process as the gentrification of the Short North, the necessity of driving “40 minutes to get to the next desired neighborhood”, is meaningless on Columbus’ scale.

    The google street views and village densities of these NY “Hipsturbs” would suggest the equivalent move would be more like Short North => Clintonville or Grandview.

    #534547

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    The above articled must not be talking about Cbus.

    The desirable suburbs here cost at best the same, usually more.

    #534548

    AmyD
    Participant

    We live in the Olentangy school district/ Lewis Center burbs and ended up here because we had one day to find a house (we were in Athens) and couldn’t afford Clintonville.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 52 total)

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