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Columbus School System - Is it really that bad?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Q&A Columbus School System – Is it really that bad?

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Viewing 8 posts - 31 through 38 (of 38 total)
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  • #209488

    joev
    Participant

    gramarye wrote >>
    You forgot firearms training.

    We won’t need firearms when the end times come and take away all the sinners.

    #209489

    TaraK
    Participant

    I’m never having kids, but if I did, I’d want them out of the house as much as possible.

    Again, not having them.

    #209490

    kingfish
    Member

    We live in Italian Village with two little ones ages 3 and 5, and our designated school was Weinland Park Elementary despite being able to see Hubbard elementary from our upstairs window. We opted for the lottery and got into Indianola Alternative K-8, and we’re very, very happy. Weinland Park bears the brunt of a hardcore pocket of poverty, and while it certainly would have been an interesting experience, we just weren’t up for the challenge. While we could have easily lotteried into Hubbard–which draws from a wider pool of students or differing socioeconomic backgrounds (and was much closer)–the school failed to impress. We’re grateful for how things turned out.

    The things we love about living in the city–a wide variety of people from differing backgrounds with wide ranging experience and needs–also make it hard for city schools to succeed. It should come as no shock that Upper Arlington and Dublin and Worthington schools consistently test well on the school report card sites–they are tasked with teaching a homogenous, well-fed, well-clothed student body with few serious near-term and long-term expectations beyond college-placement.

    Ultimately, though, a school lives and dies by its level and quality of community involvement. This is certainly true in Columbus. Sadly, there’s a low-level of neighborhood investment in the Villages (German, Italian and Victorian); the majority of the new homeowners are not concerned with the schools. You will, however, find it in Clintonville.

    #209491

    berdawn
    Member

    kingfish wrote >>
    We live in Italian Village with two little ones ages 3 and 5, and our designated school was Weinland Park Elementary despite being able to see Hubbard elementary from our upstairs window. We opted for the lottery and got into Indianola Alternative K-8, and we’re very, very happy. Weinland Park bears the brunt of a hardcore pocket of poverty, and while it certainly would have been an interesting experience, we just weren’t up for the challenge. While we could have easily lotteried into Hubbard–which draws from a wider pool of students or differing socioeconomic backgrounds (and was much closer)–the school failed to impress. We’re grateful for how things turned out.
    The things we love about living in the city–a wide variety of people from differing backgrounds with wide ranging experience and needs–also make it hard for city schools to succeed. It should come as no shock that Upper Arlington and Dublin and Worthington schools consistently test well on the school report card sites–they are tasked with teaching a homogenous, well-fed, well-clothed student body with few serious near-term and long-term expectations beyond college-placement.
    Ultimately, though, a school lives and dies by its level and quality of community involvement. This is certainly true in Columbus. Sadly, there’s a low-level of neighborhood investment in the Villages (German, Italian and Victorian); the majority of the new homeowners are not concerned with the schools. You will, however, find it in Clintonville.

    If you haven’t checked out the Sophie Rogers school housed at WP elementary for your 3 y/o, you should. I’m not sure how many openings they have, but it is a truly fantastic pre-school. Congrats on getting in to Indianola! (is hubbard the one on 2nd ave?)

    #209492

    kingfish
    Member

    Thanks! We’ll look into Sophie Rogers. Hubbard is the school with the Cupola on Hubbard between Park and Dennison. The school on 2nd was Second Avenue Elementary which sadly closed in 2005 or 2006.

    #209493

    BCNation
    Participant

    Homeschooling is like being cut from civilization, because a child learns his/her social skills at a young age, and if they are homeschooled, they kinda miss out on things their peers would get; but on the flipside, if they aren’t going to learn anything from the schools, that would be an alternate route to take.

    #209494

    columbusfoodie
    Participant

    Brant Jones wrote >>

    lifeontwowheels wrote >> There is always homeschooling.

    Yeah, so what about homeschooling? Are they a reasonable alternative to public schools? There’s a big myth out there that homeschooled kids turn out to be socially inept and that their parents are overly concerned with religious/moral instruction. Most of the homeschooling info I found on Google is written from biased sources. What’s the CU consensus?

    I don’t have kids, but if I did, I would probably homeschool (or at the very least, enroll them in private or a charter school). The unfortunate part of a modern public school education is that those who are either end of the spectrum (learning disabled vs. gifted) don’t get the level of education they need. It’s as if classroom learning and resources are dedicated toward the 25-75th percentile. Those who fall under that get limited help at best (my sister, for example, is functionally illiterate and lacks serious life skills because they decided to socially promote her and give her busy work rather than address remedial skills).

    I spent my formative years in private school, and didn’t go to public school until the 7th grade. My grades did a nose-dive at about the same time – whereas the private school had the time and resources to nurture gifted students, the public school just put me in a one-size-fits-all classroom where I got bored and blew off my homework because it was stuff I had already done 2 or 3 years before, LOL.

    If I did homeschool, I’d band together with other parents to form non-religious homeschooling groups for social experiences/group trips, etc. I don’t think that homeschooling = isolation if the world becomes your classroom. And I’d reconsider during the high school years, as I lack the expertise in certain subjects (physics, foreign language, calculus, etc) in order to provide them with the education they’ll need to a) get into a good college and b) thrive there.

    BTW, the reason I’m so opinionated about this one is because I live in the Southwestern City School District – needless to say, living in this part of town is like being in the middle of the Hatfields and the McCoys.

    #209495

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    BCNation wrote >>
    Homeschooling is like being cut from civilization, because a child learns his/her social skills at a young age, and if they are homeschooled, they kinda miss out on things their peers would get; but on the flipside, if they aren’t going to learn anything from the schools, that would be an alternate route to take.

    I think it largely depends on the approach a parent takes. There are more than enough opportunities for a child to learn social skills in a home school setting. It also depends on which social skills one is talking about.

    I loved (and learned a lot) from my years in Scouts. If I home-schooled I would definitely take a look at Cub Scouts/Girl Scouts or a similar program that would give my kid(s) a fairly regular opportunity to interact, socialize and play with others of the same age. Same goes for things like summer camps. If you are in a a Catholic parish with a school they do (or at least did when I was going through) allow a pretty open enrollment for sports as a child gets older. I can remember a few homeschool kids on my sport teams in elementary school. And we have a number of city wide sports opportunities open to all, as well as opportunities in the arts and theatre.

    I don’t think it’s a perfect alternative to traditional schools. It is an alternative if one has taken a look at what goes into it and approaches it from the right perspective. I think one thing, having worked with younger kids, that I do see as a particular advantage with HS is the ability to tailor your child’s education to fit their learning style and development.

    SK,

    I think thats one of the keys is finding other HS families with similar values and approaches to education that can help in filling in the gaps. Heck, maybe we’ll have a CU homeschooling group one of these days.

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