Our City Online

Messageboard - Q&A

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Columbus School System - Is it really that bad?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Q&A Columbus School System – Is it really that bad?

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #209473

    Brant
    Participant

    lifeontwowheels wrote >> There is always homeschooling.

    Yeah, so what about homeschooling? Are they a reasonable alternative to public schools? There’s a big myth out there that homeschooled kids turn out to be socially inept and that their parents are overly concerned with religious/moral instruction. Most of the homeschooling info I found on Google is written from biased sources. What’s the CU consensus?

    #209474

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    Brant Jones wrote >>

    lifeontwowheels wrote >> There is always homeschooling.

    Yeah, so what about homeschooling? Are they a reasonable alternative to public schools? There’s a big myth out there that homeschooled kids turn out to be socially inept and that their parents are overly concerned with religious/moral instruction. Most of the homeschooling info I found on Google is written from biased sources. What’s the CU consensus?

    I’d say it depends on whether the child has siblings. An only child who is homeschooled might have more problems interacting with people than one with a brother or sister to provide them with more informal interaction. As always, YMMV.

    As to the older posts in this thread, I won’t say much except to note that Woodward Park Middle School is now rated “Continuous Improvement”.

    #209475

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    Analogue Kid wrote >>

    Brant Jones wrote >>

    lifeontwowheels wrote >> There is always homeschooling.

    Yeah, so what about homeschooling? Are they a reasonable alternative to public schools? There’s a big myth out there that homeschooled kids turn out to be socially inept and that their parents are overly concerned with religious/moral instruction. Most of the homeschooling info I found on Google is written from biased sources. What’s the CU consensus?

    I’d say it depends on whether the child has siblings. An only child who is homeschooled might have more problems interacting with people than one with a brother or sister to provide them with more informal interaction. As always, YMMV.
    As to the older posts in this thread, I won’t say much except to note that Woodward Park Middle School is now rated “Continuous Improvement”.

    There are also a number of homeschooling groups that exist that bring those kids together for different activities. In a city like Columbus, you also have no shortage of things that will get the kid out and socializing. Things like scouts, swim lessons, summer camps, art programs and the like.

    #209476

    alison
    Member

    Just to chime in on the per pupil descrepancy — aside from the fixed costs mentioned, COlumbus City Schools has to provide transportation for all students within the district — regardless of whether or not they’re going to a CCS school. So they have higher per-pupil transporrtation costs because they’re responsible for transporting other schools’ kids.

    There are also increased costs for special needs kids, whether its ESL, physically handicapped or emotional challenged. I know some people have chosen to send their special needs kids to CCS because a larger district can afford more offerings than smaller systems. But I think there are also some legal obligations, as with the transportation, thatt the district has to provide some special education servvices to any child within the district, whether or not they are in a CCS school.

    Per-pupil spending by itselff, is not a good indicator.

    #209477

    alison
    Member

    And I just have to chime in about homeschooling — it’s only as effective as the teacher!

    #209478

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    Brant Jones wrote >>

    lifeontwowheels wrote >> There is always homeschooling.

    Yeah, so what about homeschooling? Are they a reasonable alternative to public schools? There’s a big myth out there that homeschooled kids turn out to be socially inept and that their parents are overly concerned with religious/moral instruction. Most of the homeschooling info I found on Google is written from biased sources. What’s the CU consensus?

    Given studies that have found that more than 70% of parents were homeschooling their kids “to provide religious or moral instruction”, I would say that’s not exactly an unfair stereotype. (http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2006/homeschool/parentsreasons.asp)

    #209479
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Some additional information about the new 2008-2009 CCS report cards can be found here:

    Columbus City Schools are Improving

    alison wrote >>
    And I just have to chime in about homeschooling — it’s only as effective as the teacher!

    +1

    #209480

    jennyw
    Participant

    Another CAHS grad here. Except for a month at Medary Elementary (which, I must say, was awful), my experience in the Columbus school system was pretty a positive one. (I went to Douglas for elementary school and Mifflin for middle school.)

    During my middle school years, my parents did consider sending me to private school (CSG or Wellington), but I argued against it. It’s fair to say that I was not terribly academically challenged in middle school, but I think some of the social aspects, i.e. having to learn to relate with and get along with people who did not grow up in a white, middle-class neighborhood with college-graduate parents, was really helpful in helping me relate to and with people now, as an adult.

    I really loved my time at CAHS, and while I knew it was special even back then, I don’t think I realized the degree of its awesomeness until making friends with folks who had gone to huge schools, schools that weren’t as inclusive of all types of people, schools that didn’t challenge students’ brains or creativity nearly as much. And, I have to say, this may be a product of my social circles, but everyone I knew who attended suburban or private schools (i.e., whose parents wanted to avoid the “bad city” schools) were WAY more into drinking, drugs, etc. than were the people I was going to school with.

    To be fair, I’d say that the alternative/magnet schools capture one of the things that make private schools special: parental involvement. If a kid is attending a magnet school, that’s proof of some parental motivation and interest in the quality of education.

    As to the homeschooling thing: Having not been a participant in it, I can only report what I’ve witnessed. I had a dorm mate who I’m fairly sure had Asperger’s, grew up in a small town, was homeschooled and once told me that he’d never seen an Asian person before attending college. While he was smart (we were in the honors college), it was clearly that he hadn’t had much exposure to the outside world (even keeping in mind the whole Asperger’s thing), which I think can be a real detriment with homeschooling.

    On the other hand, I had a roommate who was homeschooled because her parents thought their rural Kentucky school system wasn’t good enough for her or her sisters. Said roomie was whip-smart, graduating from the honors college and earning a master’s at the same time, all in four years. When she told me about her experience with homeschooling, she said her folks made sure that she and her sisters were involved in *tons* of activities with other kids, such as theater and arts groups. She did also ultimately opt to attend the town’s public high school because she wanted the social experience of going to school with other kids, but she was pretty happy as a whole with having been homeschooled.

    #209481

    TaraK
    Participant

    Articles like this one are all over the place. I think it’s safe to say that larger cities’ schools generally have comparable issues. I have no personal local experience to relate, other than really wanting to help the kid who works at my favorite gyro truck learn addition and subtraction.

    As for home schooling, I’m sure kids can still socialize and do well. My primary concern (if I were one of them, that is) would be how on earth you date much in high school? Even if you do tons of activities, your circle would be pretty limited.

    #209482

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    TaraK wrote >>
    Articles like this one are all over the place. I think it’s safe to say that larger cities’ schools generally have comparable issues. I have no personal local experience to relate, other than really wanting to help the kid who works at my favorite gyro truck learn addition and subtraction.
    As for home schooling, I’m sure kids can still socialize and do well. My primary concern (if I were one of them, that is) would be how on earth you date much in high school? Even if you do tons of activities, your circle would be pretty limited.

    I knew some home schoolers who did K-8 at home and then went to a regular HS. IF I ever have kids and did decide to homeschool, that would probably be the route I would take.

    If done right and the right attitude, I think homeschooling can be a great alternative. Given the things we have access to here in CMH (the zoo, art museum, CAPA, Ballet Met, Columbus Library, COSI, Statehouse, OSU etc.) one could really take advantage and provide their child a huge leg up.

    #209483

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    jennyw wrote >>
    Another CAHS grad here. Except for a month at Medary Elementary (which, I must say, was awful), my experience in the Columbus school system was pretty a positive one. (I went to Douglas for elementary school and Mifflin for middle school.)

    I had a bunch of friends who went to Douglas and enjoyed it despite the lack of walls. :-p

    jennyw wrote >>
    And, I have to say, this may be a product of my social circles, but everyone I knew who attended suburban or private schools (i.e., whose parents wanted to avoid the “bad city” schools) were WAY more into drinking, drugs, etc. than were the people I was going to school with.

    This was also my experience. I worked at a grocery store with mostly UAHS types and I was shocked at the pervasive drug and alcohol culture there. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not like everybody at my school was an angel, but in Columbus there isn’t so much the feeling that “everbody is doing it”.

    #209484

    jennyw
    Participant

    Walls are just so constricting.

    #209485

    gramarye
    Participant

    lifeontwowheels wrote >>

    TaraK wrote >>
    Articles like this one are all over the place. I think it’s safe to say that larger cities’ schools generally have comparable issues. I have no personal local experience to relate, other than really wanting to help the kid who works at my favorite gyro truck learn addition and subtraction.
    As for home schooling, I’m sure kids can still socialize and do well. My primary concern (if I were one of them, that is) would be how on earth you date much in high school? Even if you do tons of activities, your circle would be pretty limited.

    I knew some home schoolers who did K-8 at home and then went to a regular HS. IF I ever have kids and did decide to homeschool, that would probably be the route I would take.
    If done right and the right attitude, I think homeschooling can be a great alternative. Given the things we have access to here in CMH (the zoo, art museum, CAPA, Ballet Met, Columbus Library, COSI, Statehouse, OSU etc.) one could really take advantage and provide their child a huge leg up.

    I’ve considered this route as well, but realistically, I think I’d rather have my children in a good public or private school from the outset. I’m worried that they’d be a little too solitary if I home schooled them, simply because I’m somewhat solitary by instinct and, being honest with myself, I might not take them to enough social activities to get the kind of peer group exposure that a developing child should have.

    Of course, my future neighborhood and wife would also factor heavily into the decision, so it’s impossible to say yet. It’s a long way off for me.

    However, I think that the K-8 route makes a lot of sense because the actual book learning part of education through that point is still largely “general.” The lack of a real chemistry lab doesn’t make much of a difference when you’re not really looking at chem classes yet.

    #209486

    joev
    Participant

    I am planning to have 19 kids, then home school them to 4th grade proficiency level, while teaching them their gender roles and how Adam and Eve rode dinosaurs to battle against the Devil.

    They’ll be plenty socialized with so many other blessings around!

    #209487

    gramarye
    Participant

    You forgot firearms training.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 38 total)

The forum ‘Q&A’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: