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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 121 through 135 (of 227 total)
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  • #392364
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Although it’s a distinction that has been eclipsed by recent events, Columbus was the first large American city to have a black mayor without a black majority population. We also have a large number of other black people involved at a high level in city government. And at one time we were rated the best city to raise black children in by BET magazine.

    It all goes to show there’s more to diversity than just numbers. New York is probably the most diverse city in the US, but when I lived there, it felt like everyone stuck to a tiny clique of people just like them.

    While there are large numbers of people in this city living very “non-diverse” lives, I’ve also seen plenty of genuine friendships, relationships and social interactions that go across race, sexual orientation, social-economic class, educational background and ideology –more than I’ve encountered in other places that might be more diverse by the numbers. To me, at least, the “real” Columbus is the diverse one, not the other one.

    #392365

    Pablo
    Participant

    Columbusite wrote >>
    Really, I think you’d be hard pressed to say that we’d be having this discussion if we had bucked the trend of Midwestern cities that fully embraced car-culture and instead had adopted the attitude on the coasts where cities only somewhat bought into car culture.

    Oh yeah, LA and San Diego “only somewhat bought into car culture”?

    #392366

    Yes, I was speaking in generalities, so let’s just ignore the point of that post.

    And as far as San Diego goes count how many urban blocks they didn’t tear down for parking lots in their downtown and compare it to ours. Enough people there valued their urban core to keep it mostly intact, i.e. only somewhat embracing car culture.

    #392367

    Pro Se
    Participant

    The New York Times has again mentioned Jenis Splendid–and by extension Columbus–in an article today regarding artisan ice cream and gelato. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/04/dining/04icecream.html?_r=1&scp=5&sq=ice%20cream&st=cse

    #392368

    greenhouse1014
    Participant

    I think the catch about diversity here is not that there’s not a strong MIX of people. I think it’s more that those people do not intermingle much.

    #392369

    thecandlelab
    Participant

    This thread, and the matching thread of “are you stick of defending Columbus”, are truly puzzling.

    I don’t want to live in a city that can be reduced to a tagline or a concept. There are so many exciting things happening here, and I don’t know a single person who would be happier here with a better tagline or marketing strategy.

    There are people who are spending time creating really interesting things in Columbus, and then there are people who spend their time posting online about how they need better marketing tools to justify their city to their out-of-town friends.

    Weak. Get out there and do something, and spend less time worrying about what your friends think of your city. Because they are most likely on a message board somewhere complaining about their own town’s tagline.

    #392370

    thecandlelab wrote >>
    This thread, and the matching thread of “are you stick of defending Columbus”, are truly puzzling.
    I don’t want to live in a city that can be reduced to a tagline or a concept. There are so many exciting things happening here, and I don’t know a single person who would be happier here with a better tagline or marketing strategy.
    There are people who are spending time creating really interesting things in Columbus, and then there are people who spend their time posting online about how they need better marketing tools to justify their city to their out-of-town friends.
    Weak. Get out there and do something, and spend less time worrying about what your friends think of your city. Because they are most likely on a message board somewhere complaining about their own town’s tagline.

    I hear what you are saying, but …

    Some of us are engaged in activities which involve getting money, business and butts into CMH. The lack of supporting infrastructure and a coherent identitie(s) is an obstacle. Try selling the idea that a regional group should have their convention here. Or trying recruiting someone to come here for a 5-10 yr stint or longer. You are competing against the Austins and Portlands of the US. It is an uphill battle. No, it is ice-skating uphill.

    And it really matters. The whole “creative class” idea is great except it relies on a sustainable economy which is not fleeing the premises (and that “creative class” is one of the flightiest.) We need money coming in and not just flowing through, but staying and gaining velocity. It is a wonderful, frustrating web of connections. The fact remains that historically we are a capitol city and therefore a parasite. We need influx of capital and we need to work on establishing a distinctly productive base.

    A.

    #392371

    To add, many of us who are worried about the image of Columbus or selling it are not doing so for ego or other solipsistic reasons. There are genuine, real-world concerns going on.

    A.

    #392372

    thecandlelab
    Participant

    Those are all valid points. But most of these posts aren’t written from that standpoint. They seem to originate from the viewpoint of wishing someone who generate a cool “brand” that would make them feel better about where they live. This whole site is a testament to how many cool things are happening here, and how many more good ideas are in the works, so the ongoing angst-ridden identity crisis is what is puzzling to me.

    But your point is well-taken. I just think every time an interesting concept bubbles up with regional/national coverage (Jeni’s, Dirty Frank’s, Wonderland, etc), it helps to tell our story much better than a logo or tagline could do.

    #392373

    jimmaneri
    Participant

    Howabout: “Cbus, ballcapped fatties who watch too much ESPN.” or Columbus: no place has a larger, better, and more derided art community.” or “Columbus, if you’re not on a coast, we’re gayer than you are”

    #392374
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    greenhouse1014 wrote >>
    I think the catch about diversity here is not that there’s not a strong MIX of people. I think it’s more that those people do not intermingle much.

    That’s really the opposite of my experience of Columbus. Of course, any group that I’m a part of is pretty much at least token diverse just by having me in it. Still, I tend to think that anyone who isn’t experiencing a diverse Columbus isn’t really interested in a diverse Columbus.

    #392375

    If you are “engaged in activities which involve getting people and money into CMH” – fine, you’re in marketing, or you’re in tourism, or whatever. There’s nothing wrong with that. We all need jobs. It’s just bullshit to think that because YOU need a slogan for what YOUR business is doing that two million people have to live under a banner with a lame slogan written on it.

    And frankly – I don’t care for that business, I don’t think it helps the community, and I don’t want to live under that banner. Go move to Austin or Portland if you want to live in a city with a slogan, or you can’t work in your field without a slogan.

    It’s also worth considering that if you can’t pull people into town without making up silly names for Columbus that you’re just not good at your job.

    #392376

    jus10dk
    Participant

    i think part of the work is in branding without excluding… that just makes sense.

    #392377

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    If you are “engaged in activities which involve getting people and money into CMH” – fine, you’re in marketing, or you’re in tourism, or whatever. There’s nothing wrong with that. We all need jobs. It’s just bullshit to think that because YOU need a slogan for what YOUR business is doing that two million people have to live under a banner with a lame slogan written on it.
    And frankly – I don’t care for that business, I don’t think it helps the community, and I don’t want to live under that banner. Go move to Austin or Portland if you want to live in a city with a slogan, or you can’t work in your field without a slogan.
    It’s also worth considering that if you can’t pull people into town without making up silly names for Columbus that you’re just not good at your job.

    I hope you didn’t hurt yourself jumping to so many baseless conclusions!

    I am not in tourism or marketing nor are the significant numbers of people who are involved in economic activities which require bodies and capital to move into Columbus. For example, OSU recruits based on quality of life especially in areas where its own merits are pretty fungible with other institutions. A better brand identity is not the final deciding factor, but is often more important as to making the first cut. A brand is an instant message that gives you the opening to sell on the deeper merits.

    Slogan? Did I say anything about a slogan? It is your own hang-ups that lead you to fling invective here.

    Are we going to collapse because we lack branding and the like? Of course not. Could we do better? Absolutely! I would love to see city services not cut, but expanded because our revenue base grows. I would really love to see our schools doing better with more money from an expanded real estate base. All those things benefit everyone.

    A.

    #392378

    JonMyers
    Participant

    jus10dk wrote >>
    i think part of the work is in branding without excluding… that just makes sense.

    This is why Columbus fails at branding the city.

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