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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 227 total)
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  • #392349

    wassan
    Member

    ja wrote >>
    I think her point is that diversity is not a differentiator for Columbus, compared to any other large city.
    According to the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, the racial composition of Columbus was as follows:
    White: 65.4% (Non-Hispanic Whites: 62.7%)
    Black or African American: 26.4%
    Native American: 0.2%
    Asian: 4.1%
    Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: <0.1%
    Some other race: 1.4%
    Two or more races: 2.4%
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 4.5%

    Yeah that’s exactly what I’m saying, diversity isn’t a differentiation point in Columbus, because for a city of its size (and with the number of campuses nearby) its really nothing unique. Please never use the “but there are all types of ethnic restaurants” – yeah, just like in most cities of its size. Come on.
    The issue with the diversity is that while there are different communities, they are not integrated. That would be a differentiating factor, not just the fact that the communities exist in an area. I live in an interactive neighborhood, but I still don’t think there is all that much diversity in it.

    I’ll respectfully disagree with you @KyleEzell – Columbus is totally white bread.

    I’m not saying that’s bad or good, I’m merely pointing out something I feel is a fact about the city. I think its funny to think that it would be something people saw as a marketing angle.

    #392350

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    cc wrote >>
    “Columbus. we plan on doing cool stuff” ;)

    I’m just saying did Austin plan on becoming a city known for music, or did it happen organically and now they just capitalize on it? Let’s capitalize on whatever Columbus’ strengths are. Food might indeed be a good one, ice cream in particular.

    #392351

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    myliftkk wrote >>
    Some of our northern friends are making some suggestions:
    suggestions for columbus slogans
    ETA: Or, we could just ask the random slogan generator

    LOL. It’s great to see them angry again.

    #392352

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    killian.15 wrote >>
    When I visited another Columbus, Columbus, Indiana to be exact, the first thing to catch my attention was what they did as for ‘branding’ the town.
    This is what I saw at the visitor center.

    But, this was just a continuation of a graphic theme I noticed in the town. I thought of this when I saw the color scheme of JonMyers’s redo of the Experience Columbus logo.



    They also took it a step farther and even put their “C” to use as a bike rack.

    [/url]

    #392353

    berdawn
    Member

    catnfiddle wrote >>
    “To your heart through your stomach.”

    I love this one!

    #392354

    MikeReed
    Participant

    I’m just saying did Austin plan on becoming a city known for music, or did it happen organically and now they just capitalize on it?

    johnwirtz wrote >>

    cc wrote >>
    “Columbus. we plan on doing cool stuff” ;)

    I’m just saying did Austin plan on becoming a city known for music, or did it happen organically and now they just capitalize on it? Let’s capitalize on whatever Columbus’ strengths are. Food might indeed be a good one, ice cream in particular.

    Yes- Austin planned it.

    Austin also had leadership that knew good ideas when they heard them- regardless of the source. They were then willing to run crazy with those ideas.

    But most importantly I think Austin’s leadership also wasn’t hell bent on having to be the author of any idea that might stick. It takes a special kind of leadership to say, “We don’t know” and then to source the best ideas, be able to recognize them, and pour leadership energy into ’em.

    #392355

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Columbus. We’ll grow your stomach.

    #392356

    manticore33
    Participant

    ja – You are talking metropolitan statistical areas, not city statistics. For instance the city of Columbus has a higher population than the city of Cleveland. But when you consider the MSA, the Cleveland region has over 700,000 more people than Columbus (Columbus MSA ~ 1.5m, Cleveland ~2.2m).

    So it is possible, on a city basis, Columbus could have a higher GLBT population, but not on a regional basis.

    #392357
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    MikeReed wrote >>
    Yes- Austin planned it.

    Austin also had leadership that knew good ideas when they heard them- regardless of the source. They were then willing to run crazy with those ideas.

    But most importantly I think Austin’s leadership also wasn’t hell bent on having to be the author of any idea that might stick. It takes a special kind of leadership to say, “We don’t know” and then to source the best ideas, be able to recognize them, and pour leadership energy into ’em.

    Austonians sound like a real agreeable group of people to have had absolutely no arguments about how city branding. Didn’t you say the other day that they have a permanent double rainbow over the city? Or was that Portland? ;)

    #392358

    JonMyers
    Participant

    I’m not a huge fan of Austin’s ad hoc city slogan “Keep Austin Weird”, but the word weird does suggest something different, maybe diversity.

    You hear what you wanna hear.

    What I do like about the slogan is it’s telling you to *do* something – keep it weird, rather than just stating Austin is something on its own – weird.

    I’m not sure the slogan would work if it read “Austin: It’s Weird”.

    #392359

    berdawn
    Member

    Columbus: both ends of the bell curve

    #392360

    MikeReed
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>

    MikeReed wrote >>
    Yes- Austin planned it.
    Austin also had leadership that knew good ideas when they heard them- regardless of the source. They were then willing to run crazy with those ideas.
    But most importantly I think Austin’s leadership also wasn’t hell bent on having to be the author of any idea that might stick. It takes a special kind of leadership to say, “We don’t know” and then to source the best ideas, be able to recognize them, and pour leadership energy into ’em.

    Austonians sound like a real agreeable group of people to have had absolutely no arguments about how city branding. Didn’t you say the other day that they have a permanent double rainbow over the city? Or was that Portland? ;)

    Didn’t say all the citizens agreed… Just that the leadership was smart.

    #392361

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    MikeReed wrote >>

    I’m just saying did Austin plan on becoming a city known for music, or did it happen organically and now they just capitalize on it?

    johnwirtz wrote >>

    cc wrote >>
    “Columbus. we plan on doing cool stuff” ;)

    I’m just saying did Austin plan on becoming a city known for music, or did it happen organically and now they just capitalize on it? Let’s capitalize on whatever Columbus’ strengths are. Food might indeed be a good one, ice cream in particular.

    Yes- Austin planned it.
    Austin also had leadership that knew good ideas when they heard them- regardless of the source. They were then willing to run crazy with those ideas.
    But most importantly I think Austin’s leadership also wasn’t hell bent on having to be the author of any idea that might stick. It takes a special kind of leadership to say, “We don’t know” and then to source the best ideas, be able to recognize them, and pour leadership energy into ’em.

    I’m surprised to hear that this was a planned effort. Nevertheless, I think allowing the city to become known for something on its own rather than trying to tell people what the city is known for would probably be more effective in the long run. This does take a kind of leadership that encourages, fosters, and listens to creativity. For what it’s worth, I liked the Indy Art Capital idea.

    #392362

    Columbusite
    Member

    @John – You meant “Indie”, but that reads very well for our neighbor to the west (I don’t know what their local art scene is like).

    Really, I think you’d be hard pressed to say that we’d be having this discussion if we had bucked the trend of Midwestern cities that fully embraced car-culture and instead had adopted the attitude on the coasts where cities only somewhat bought into car culture. Could you imagine if we had maintained and improved our urban neighborhoods so that today Parsons, W Broad, and even Linden were all great alternatives to N High and its neighborhoods? Cities such as New York City had enough involved citizens[/url] to save some neighborhoods from the wrecking ball for more highways. How would you feel about a version of that city where some of the best neighborhoods were eviscerated or eliminated all together and in their place was asphalt and drab, huge suburban apartment complexes? Because that is what the city would look like if it had taken the same approach we did.

    We shouldn’t dwell on what we lost, but we really do need to learn from those mistakes and still haven’t. Until we do, we’re not going to compete with the significantly higher number of urban amenities that play a huge role in making major coastal cities well-known on a national level. Not only did they never lose their Short Norths and German Villages to begin with, but their Franklintons, Lindens, and Driving Parks are already well on their way back, rather just getting started or declining further.

    #392363

    HeySquare
    Participant

    Columbusite wrote >>
    Could you imagine if we had maintained and improved our urban neighborhoods so that today Parsons, W Broad, and even Linden were all great alternatives to N High and its neighborhoods? Cities such as New York City had enough involved citizens[/url] to save some neighborhoods from the wrecking ball for more highways. How would you feel about a version of that city where some of the best neighborhoods were eviscerated or eliminated all together and in their place was asphalt and drab, huge suburban apartment complexes? Because that is what the city would look like if it had taken the same approach we did.

    I’m sure the involved citizens of the South Bronx appreciate that you don’t believe Tremont was eviscerated. Just because Greenwich Village survived, you think New York was successful?

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 227 total)

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