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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 227 total)
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  • #392334

    More:

    “Columbus: Welcome to a landlocked city named after a famous captain.”

    “Fewer landmarks – fewer terrorist targets. Columbus.”

    “Columbus: Supporting marketing gimmicks over substantive improvements since 1816.”

    “When you can’t afford to move to Portland, there’s Columbus.”

    “Columbus – Yeah, I think I’ve heard of that place.”

    “Achieving success by lowering expectations. That’s Columbus.”

    #392335

    Even more:

    “Columbus: making the most of getting lost since 1492.”

    “Welcome to Columbus. Some gay people live here.”

    “Columbus – It’s not as bad as you think.”

    #392336

    …trying to stop.

    “Columbus… so, now what do we do?”

    “We put the rage back in average.”

    “It’s what do you get when you rearrange osculum and add a ‘b’.”

    #392337

    Brant
    Participant

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    Why do we have to advertise Columbus to begin with? Is it just an inferiority complex in the minds of the young people who live here and can’t get over the fact that Columbus isn’t known as a “cool city”? The interests of the tourism industry/visitors board are obvious, but for the rest of us, WHY?
    Everyone in Clintonville, Grandview, VV, GV, Short North, etc. should know that if Columbus picks up a reputation as a cool city, your rent will go up and the competition for rentals in your neighborhood will too. You either pay the inflated prices or you move to a crime-ridden neighborhood or the suburbs.
    The majority of Columbus residents would suffer an overall negative effect with a successful national marketing plan to drive tourists and residents into our beautiful city with low traffic/pollution/crime that is full of great people, culture, and cuisine.

    Because if you are not moving forward, you are moving backwards with respect to everyone else. Or you can be Youngstown.

    Not necessarily. Why are the “benefits” of perpetual growth axiomatic?

    #392338

    Andrew Hall
    Member

    Brant Jones wrote >>

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    Why do we have to advertise Columbus to begin with? Is it just an inferiority complex in the minds of the young people who live here and can’t get over the fact that Columbus isn’t known as a “cool city”? The interests of the tourism industry/visitors board are obvious, but for the rest of us, WHY?
    Everyone in Clintonville, Grandview, VV, GV, Short North, etc. should know that if Columbus picks up a reputation as a cool city, your rent will go up and the competition for rentals in your neighborhood will too. You either pay the inflated prices or you move to a crime-ridden neighborhood or the suburbs.
    The majority of Columbus residents would suffer an overall negative effect with a successful national marketing plan to drive tourists and residents into our beautiful city with low traffic/pollution/crime that is full of great people, culture, and cuisine.

    Because if you are not moving forward, you are moving backwards with respect to everyone else. Or you can be Youngstown.

    Not necessarily. Why are the “benefits” of perpetual growth axiomatic?

    Because population growth is axiomatic and geometric. So you had better grow in terms of economy or each person gets less. Or, more likely and even worse, most people get far less and a few get more. Good growth is inclusive.

    Because other places are growing and improving. if you are not, you are getting worse in relative terms.

    I find a lot of the reactions in this threads disturbing. When I graduated college, there was a lot of ‘Columbus sucks’ sentiment. Some people left. Many took this as a challenge and it made them ambitious. They took areas where we lacked and busted ass either in support or to make it happen. Now I see lots of self back-patting and continually tossing around the words great or excellent. That is worse. It kills ambition and drive. It is like those fake trophies for nothing every kid sports league tosses out have memetically infected people.

    A.

    #392339

    KyleEzell
    Member

    Again, diversity is expected in cities.

    Hell no it’s not. In your world city of New York, maybe. But not in mid-sized cities in the south, west or midwest, generally speaking. Depends on what you mean by “city.” Columbus may seem so, but we are not as white bread as a lot of cities our size.

    #392340

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>

    How many of you all have Somalian friends you run with?

    How many Hasidic dudes you roll with?

    #392341

    JonMyers
    Participant

    michaelcoyote wrote >>

    JonMyers wrote >>
    How many of you all have Somalian friends you run with?

    How many Hasidic dudes you roll with?

    Hasidic none. Jewish a ton.

    #392342

    JimSweeney
    Participant

    ja wrote >>

    Core_Models wrote >>
    If you’ve got the second largest gay population combined with the second largest Somali population, I’d say that right there pretty much ends the “conservative white guys” stereotype.
    ETA: Then throw in the second largest college by enrollment…of course, we could just have a giant number of gay Somali college students.

    Just curious where you came up with Columbus having the second largest gay population?
    Top LGBT populations in U.S. cities and states
    The U.S. city with the highest gay population is New York with an estimated 272,493 gay residents.[8] Los Angeles is second with 154,270, followed by Chicago with 114,449 and San Francisco with 94,234. It is much more likely to encounter gay residents in San Francisco, Seattle, Atlanta, and Boston as a higher percentage of those cities’ residents are gay.
    The U.S. metropolitain areas with the largest gay residents are New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island, with an estimated 568,903 gay residents, followed by Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana with 442,211, and Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin with 288,748.[9]
    The following charts show a list of the top U.S. cities, states, and metro areas with: 1) the highest population of gay residents, and 2) the highest percentage of gay residents within city limits. (GLB population as a percentage of total residents).[8] The numbers given are estimates based on American Community Survey data.[10]
    Rank City Percentage
    of City
    Population GLB Population
    population rank
    1 New York City 4.5% 272,493 1
    2 Los Angeles 5.6% 154,270 2
    3 Chicago 5.7% 114,449 3
    4 San Francisco 15.4% 94,234 4
    5 Phoenix 6.4% 63,222 5
    6 Houston 4.4% 61,976 6
    7 San Diego 6.8% 61,945 7
    8 Dallas 7.0% 58,473 8
    9 Seattle 12.9% 57,993 9
    10 Boston 12.3% 50,540 10
    11 Philadelphia 4.2% 43,320 11
    12 Atlanta 12.8% 39,085 12
    13 San Jose 5.8% 37,260 13

    So what are the Cols numbers?

    #392343

    Core_Models
    Member

    On a per-capita basis, Columbus ranks third in gay population nationally behind San Francisco and Atlanta, according to Michael Daniels, editor of the Columbus gay newspaper Outlook Weekly.

    From a TOP article a couple years back, I’ve heard the 2nd number several times as well.

    #392344

    Well, it’s a good thing gay people live here or we’d be really screwed. We could market our gayness as being diverse; like, we have diverse diversity. Maybe we could advertise Columbus as the best place for black men to get it on the down-low.

    Jeez – this is a silly thread.

    I run with a bunch of Hassidic guys, too, but they’re not Jewish.

    #392345

    ja
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>
    On a per-capita basis, Columbus ranks third in gay population nationally behind San Francisco and Atlanta, according to Michael Daniels, editor of the Columbus gay newspaper Outlook Weekly.
    From a TOP article a couple years back, I’ve heard the 2nd number several times as well.

    These charts show a list of the top 10 US metropolitan areas with the highest LGB population in terms of numbers of total gay, lesbian and bisexual residents.[25]
    Rank City Percentage
    of City
    Population GLB Population
    population rank
    1 San Francisco 15.4% 94,234 4
    2 Seattle 12.9% 57,993 9
    3 Atlanta 12.8% 39,805 12
    4 Minneapolis 12.5% 34,295 16
    5 Boston 12.3% 50,540 10
    6 Sacramento 9.8% 32,108 20
    7 Portland 8.8% 35,413 14
    8 Denver 8.2% 33,698 17
    9 Washington 8.1% 32,599 18
    10 Orlando 7.7% 12,508 36

    This survey seems to dispute the Columbus editor’s claim.

    #392346

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    ja, Do you have the per capita rankings for large cities? I think that is where Columbus stands out more.

    #392347

    ja
    Member

    My previous post before the one you refer to gives the per capita rankings for the largest cities.

    According to the following, Columbus ranks approximately 12th in the nation per capita.

    http://fabulouslyinthecity.blogspot.com/2008/08/gay-america-metropolitans.html

    #392348

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Task force members are sworn to secrecy

    Public input is nominally welcomed, perhaps “heard” but that is not the same as “heeded” as I have learned. If things can be done without the noise and delay of public input, then they will proceed quietly in the background. Once the decisions have been made, we might get an “informational meeting” to tell us about those parts of the deal that we’re allowed to see.

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 227 total)

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