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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 227 total)
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  • #392319

    ja wrote >>

    Core_Models wrote >>
    If you’ve got the second largest gay population combined with the second largest Somali population, I’d say that right there pretty much ends the “conservative white guys” stereotype.

    The “conservative white guys” still run the city – don’t fool yourself. Have you checked the make-up of the Columbus Partnership lately?

    They still run the country too, but it doesn’t mean it isn’t a diverse nation.

    #392320

    ja
    Member

    I think her point is that diversity is not a differentiator for Columbus, compared to any other large city.

    According to the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, the racial composition of Columbus was as follows:
    White: 65.4% (Non-Hispanic Whites: 62.7%)
    Black or African American: 26.4%
    Native American: 0.2%
    Asian: 4.1%
    Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: <0.1%
    Some other race: 1.4%
    Two or more races: 2.4%
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 4.5%

    #392321

    ja
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>
    If you’ve got the second largest gay population combined with the second largest Somali population, I’d say that right there pretty much ends the “conservative white guys” stereotype.
    ETA: Then throw in the second largest college by enrollment…of course, we could just have a giant number of gay Somali college students.

    Just curious where you came up with Columbus having the second largest gay population?

    Top LGBT populations in U.S. cities and states
    The U.S. city with the highest gay population is New York with an estimated 272,493 gay residents.[8] Los Angeles is second with 154,270, followed by Chicago with 114,449 and San Francisco with 94,234. It is much more likely to encounter gay residents in San Francisco, Seattle, Atlanta, and Boston as a higher percentage of those cities’ residents are gay.
    The U.S. metropolitain areas with the largest gay residents are New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island, with an estimated 568,903 gay residents, followed by Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana with 442,211, and Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin with 288,748.[9]
    The following charts show a list of the top U.S. cities, states, and metro areas with: 1) the highest population of gay residents, and 2) the highest percentage of gay residents within city limits. (GLB population as a percentage of total residents).[8] The numbers given are estimates based on American Community Survey data.[10]
    Rank City Percentage
    of City
    Population GLB Population
    population rank
    1 New York City 4.5% 272,493 1
    2 Los Angeles 5.6% 154,270 2
    3 Chicago 5.7% 114,449 3
    4 San Francisco 15.4% 94,234 4
    5 Phoenix 6.4% 63,222 5
    6 Houston 4.4% 61,976 6
    7 San Diego 6.8% 61,945 7
    8 Dallas 7.0% 58,473 8
    9 Seattle 12.9% 57,993 9
    10 Boston 12.3% 50,540 10
    11 Philadelphia 4.2% 43,320 11
    12 Atlanta 12.8% 39,085 12
    13 San Jose 5.8% 37,260 13

    #392322

    howatzer
    Participant

    Columbus: somewhere between Chicago and Pittsburgh

    #392323

    Core_Models wrote >>

    ja wrote >>

    Core_Models wrote >>
    If you’ve got the second largest gay population combined with the second largest Somali population, I’d say that right there pretty much ends the “conservative white guys” stereotype.

    The “conservative white guys” still run the city – don’t fool yourself. Have you checked the make-up of the Columbus Partnership lately?

    They still run the country too, but it doesn’t mean it isn’t a diverse nation.

    Just for devil’s advocacy…this could play into the question of “what does diversity mean”? Is it having a country with many ethnic populations ruled by many ethnic populations or is it a ethnically diverse nation ruled by one race? South Africa was a diverse nation but run by apartheid, would it be classified as diverse? It is easy to brush her question of “what is diversity” off, but Core, I think you come to a conclusion far too quickly,

    *Edit–this was meant for a different post, sorry.

    #392324

    kelseyg
    Member

    There are kinds of diversity beyond racial, though that is important. I think the “huge state fair, huge gay pride” sums up that sentiment well.

    Columbus has great food (from haute cuisine to taco trucks), a variety of interesting neighborhoods (Short North to German Village), a lively political atmosphere (state government to grassroots), a world-class intellectual scene (a great research university and top hospital), excellent college football, something for the family (top zoos and libraries), all kinds of conventions (hell city tattoos to jazz & rib fest to comfest), nightlife, you name it.

    How is that not diverse? A lot of places do one thing well, and market that. I think Columbus needs to show how many things it does well.

    #392325

    drew
    Participant

    ja wrote >>
    I think her point is that diversity is not a differentiator for Columbus, compared to any other large city.
    According to the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, the racial composition of Columbus was as follows:
    White: 65.4% (Non-Hispanic Whites: 62.7%)
    Black or African American: 26.4%
    Native American: 0.2%
    Asian: 4.1%
    Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: <0.1%
    Some other race: 1.4%
    Two or more races: 2.4%
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 4.5%

    I’m almost certain that those numbers are bullshit… not because of any malfeasance on the part of the surveyors, but because participation is highly unlikely to be consistent across groups. I’d guess that the 2010 census will paint a different picture, and while it may be closer it’ll also be off by some nontrivial margin.

    #392326

    ja
    Member

    drew wrote >>

    ja wrote >>
    I think her point is that diversity is not a differentiator for Columbus, compared to any other large city.
    According to the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, the racial composition of Columbus was as follows:
    White: 65.4% (Non-Hispanic Whites: 62.7%)
    Black or African American: 26.4%
    Native American: 0.2%
    Asian: 4.1%
    Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: <0.1%
    Some other race: 1.4%
    Two or more races: 2.4%
    Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 4.5%

    I’m almost certain that those numbers are bullshit… not because of any malfeasance on the part of the surveyors, but because participation is highly unlikely to be consistent across groups. I’d guess that the 2010 census will paint a different picture, and while it may be closer it’ll also be off by some nontrivial margin.

    According to the U.S. Census 2000 whites comprised 67.9% and blacks, 24.5% in Columbus. Therefore, the numbers above already reflect an increase in other ethnic groups during this decade, and are not likely to change significantly upon the completion of the U.S. Census 2010.

    #392327

    JonMyers
    Participant

    I don’t think diversity is a point of differentiation for a place that calls itself a “city”. Diversity is expected in cities.

    That’s one thing that makes cities, cities. A diverse range of people and the efficient exchange of ideas and experiences amongst that diverse range of people.

    A drunk chatty passenger talking up a cab driver doesn’t count.

    In terms of bringing together diversity, Columbus needs a lot of work in bringing together that diverse range of people and promoting this exchange.

    If the large Somalian or other non-white populations of Columbus were somehow unusually integrated into the fabric of the city plan and leadership that would be worth noting. They’re not.

    How many of you all have Somalian friends you run with?

    I’ll also apologize to my gay friends here, but sorry a large gay population in a big city is not a point worth emphasizing that much either. It’s expected and so is tolerance in the year 2010.

    These issues of diversity are national trends that are not so unusual in this day and age and they’re certainly not worth promoting, unless you’re trying to capture the attention of Ohio’s small towns, which is fine, but you’ll have to forgive the rest of the bigger cities of this country and world for not getting too excited about diversity.

    Again, diversity is expected in cities.

    #392328

    JonMyers wrote >>
    I don’t think diversity is a point of differentiation for a place that calls itself a “city”. Diversity is expected in cities.
    That’s one thing that makes cities, cities. A diverse range of people and the efficient exchange of ideas and experiences amongst that diverse range of people.

    Jon – I believe this is called Utopia.

    #392329

    anillo
    Participant

    How about Columbus: A busload of funs!

    #392330

    MikeReed
    Participant

    What Jon Myers said.

    #392331
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    “Columbus: Kinda Diverse, Could Still Use Less White People”

    #392332

    JonMyers wrote
    In terms of bringing together diversity, Columbus needs a lot of work in bringing together that diverse range of people and promoting this exchange.

    I was thinking along the same lines. We’ve been bopping around a lot lately and I have noticed that other places show more convergence in economic and social diversity. To focus on one thing, I see a lot more ethnic diversity at higher end dining other places than I do in Columbus. In really large metropolitan areas like Chicago, that is not surprising nor indicative. In comparable cities like Indianapolis or Kansas City, I do think it shows something. I don’t think it is a problem with a specific solution. I do think it is a symptom or warning of how we need to grow inclusively.

    A.

    #392333

    My suggestions:

    “Columbus. At least we’re not Dayton.”

    “Columbus – where the real estate is so affordable, you can afford to fly to whatever city you’d rather live in.”

    “Columbus: Did you get lost on your way to Chicago?”

    “Columbus… eh.”

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 227 total)

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