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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 227 total)
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  • #392304

    dubdave00
    Participant

    Sometimes a positioning statement doesn’t need to define the brand or product but rather benefit the person reading it.

    I liked this quote from the article: “We are a diverse, youthful, knowledge-based community that is open to new ideas coming in,” Mr. Astleford said. “That has not been the tradition in the Midwest.”

    I think about the fact that even though many people leave Columbus for bigger cities, they “found themselves” here. They look back at Columbus with fond memories. To me, maybe “find yourself” (or something like that) should be the positioning.

    It’s short, simple, still vague (which is good), benefits the reader, and fits both our mainstream and indie culture quite well. It’s youth appealing because your 20s and these days, your 30s are about discovering your identity. It fits our community involvement, our arts scenes, our massive educational community. Is it a little generic? Yes. But that’s where a good agency can take a simple positioning statement and make it a legacy brand.

    “Find Yourself” surrounded by diversity.
    “Find Yourself” learning something new.
    “Find Yourself” getting involved / making a difference.
    “Find Yourself” amongst friends.

    Find Yourself. Columbus.

    I dunno. Thoughts?

    #392305

    Core_Models
    Member

    wassan wrote >>
    Columbus is a darling town, with a lot to offer. Its poorly marketed (as is most of Ohio). However, in my opinion, diversity is SO not one of it’s strong points.

    How so?

    #392306
    yurtgirl
    yurtgirl
    Participant

    redfish-bluefish wrote >>
    Identity/ Former Cowtown/Pride-
    Columbus: Steers and Queers, for real.

    u killed me with that one!

    After “flunking” out of Otterbein at the tender age of 18 I couldn’t wait to leave Cbus coz it was too much of a cowtown. I wanted excitement and the big city. 20 yrs later I moved back for family reasons and altho i’ve lived in other metropolitan cities I have chosen to stay in Columbus. one of the main is that there really is so much to do at any one time. Even tho it’s a big town it still has that small town feel to me. Maybe that’s because it’s familiar to me. And I’m sure my calling it a “town” doesn’t help the image. Most people want to brand us as a vibrant city, which it is, but guess I still can’t help call it a town.

    #392307

    drew
    Participant

    Core_Models wrote >>

    wassan wrote >>
    Columbus is a darling town, with a lot to offer. Its poorly marketed (as is most of Ohio). However, in my opinion, diversity is SO not one of it’s strong points.

    How so?

    I’m a bit surprised by that as well. I guess if you want to surround yourself with with a homogenous group of people the opportunity exists, but if you want to break out of that it isn’t really all that difficult.

    #392308

    anillo
    Participant

    yurtgirl wrote >>

    redfish-bluefish wrote >>
    Identity/ Former Cowtown/Pride-
    Columbus: Steers and Queers, for real.

    u killed me with that one!
    After “flunking” out of Otterbein at the tender age of 18 I couldn’t wait to leave Cbus coz it was too much of a cowtown. I wanted excitement and the big city. 20 yrs later I moved back for family reasons and altho i’ve lived in other metropolitan cities I have chosen to stay in Columbus. one of the main is that there really is so much to do at any one time. Even tho it’s a big town it still has that small town feel to me. Maybe that’s because it’s familiar to me. And I’m sure my calling it a “town” doesn’t help the image. Most people want to brand us as a vibrant city, which it is, but guess I still can’t help call it a town.

    How about we play off that with the slogan. Maybe like the largest little town in the world.
    crap, wait a minute =P

    #392309

    Why do we have to advertise Columbus to begin with? Is it just an inferiority complex in the minds of the young people who live here and can’t get over the fact that Columbus isn’t known as a “cool city”? The interests of the tourism industry/visitors board are obvious, but for the rest of us, WHY?

    Everyone in Clintonville, Grandview, VV, GV, Short North, etc. should know that if Columbus picks up a reputation as a cool city, your rent will go up and the competition for rentals in your neighborhood will too. You either pay the inflated prices or you move to a crime-ridden neighborhood or the suburbs.

    The majority of Columbus residents would suffer an overall negative effect with a successful national marketing plan to drive tourists and residents into our beautiful city with low traffic/pollution/crime that is full of great people, culture, and cuisine.

    #392310
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    daniel wrote >>
    it’s not mine. i just recall seeing it posted last year.

    Well done on creating a platform in which that person could express themselves. ;)

    #392311
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    If Columbus picks up a reputation as a cool city, your rent will go up and the competition for rentals in your neighborhood will too. You either pay the inflated prices or you move to a crime-ridden neighborhood or the suburbs.

    So you’re saying that nothing good would happen?

    PS: Nice new avatar. ;)

    #392312

    Andrew Hall
    Member

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    Why do we have to advertise Columbus to begin with? Is it just an inferiority complex in the minds of the young people who live here and can’t get over the fact that Columbus isn’t known as a “cool city”? The interests of the tourism industry/visitors board are obvious, but for the rest of us, WHY?
    Everyone in Clintonville, Grandview, VV, GV, Short North, etc. should know that if Columbus picks up a reputation as a cool city, your rent will go up and the competition for rentals in your neighborhood will too. You either pay the inflated prices or you move to a crime-ridden neighborhood or the suburbs.
    The majority of Columbus residents would suffer an overall negative effect with a successful national marketing plan to drive tourists and residents into our beautiful city with low traffic/pollution/crime that is full of great people, culture, and cuisine.

    Because if you are not moving forward, you are moving backwards with respect to everyone else. Or you can be Youngstown.

    I think it is even worse of an inferiority complex to think like that way – that we *can’t* compete with everyone else. To think we really can’t do any better, so we shouldn’t try. That we should be scared of big city “problems” and pretend that every thing here is above average. That type of complacency is the surest way to drive out anything and anyone that is has ambitions to be great.

    A.

    #392313

    Core_Models
    Member

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    Why do we have to advertise Columbus to begin with? Is it just an inferiority complex in the minds of the young people who live here and can’t get over the fact that Columbus isn’t known as a “cool city”? The interests of the tourism industry/visitors board are obvious, but for the rest of us, WHY?
    Everyone in Clintonville, Grandview, VV, GV, Short North, etc. should know that if Columbus picks up a reputation as a cool city, your rent will go up and the competition for rentals in your neighborhood will too. You either pay the inflated prices or you move to a crime-ridden neighborhood or the suburbs.
    The majority of Columbus residents would suffer an overall negative effect with a successful national marketing plan to drive tourists and residents into our beautiful city with low traffic/pollution/crime that is full of great people, culture, and cuisine.

    I’d bet real money that the people providing things like that great cuisine would disagree.

    #392314

    wassan
    Member

    drew wrote >>

    Core_Models wrote >>

    wassan wrote >>
    Columbus is a darling town, with a lot to offer. Its poorly marketed (as is most of Ohio). However, in my opinion, diversity is SO not one of it’s strong points.

    How so?

    I’m a bit surprised by that as well. I guess if you want to surround yourself with with a homogenous group of people the opportunity exists, but if you want to break out of that it isn’t really all that difficult.

    I suppose it depends on how you define diversity. I just don’t think there is all that much of it in Columbus that would allow you to use it as a differentiator or a selling point. It’s still mostly just a white town with a lot of people who haven’t had much exposure to other cultures.
    How are you defining it’s diversity? Gay/straight? Artists/traditional professionals? Cultural?
    (I’m seriously asking – don’t interpret the tone as negative)

    #392315

    ja
    Member

    I’ve always described Columbus as one big suburb – mostly white with mostly white-collar jobs; socially tolerant, but fiscally conservative.

    #392316
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    wassan wrote >>

    drew wrote >>

    Core_Models wrote >>

    wassan wrote >>
    Columbus is a darling town, with a lot to offer. Its poorly marketed (as is most of Ohio). However, in my opinion, diversity is SO not one of it’s strong points.

    How so?

    I’m a bit surprised by that as well. I guess if you want to surround yourself with with a homogenous group of people the opportunity exists, but if you want to break out of that it isn’t really all that difficult.

    I suppose it depends on how you define diversity. I just don’t think there is all that much of it in Columbus that would allow you to use it as a differentiator or a selling point. It’s still mostly just a white town with a lot of people who haven’t had much exposure to other cultures.
    How are you defining it’s diversity? Gay/straight? Artists/traditional professionals? Cultural?
    (I’m seriously asking – don’t interpret the tone as negative)

    There’s at least elements of diversity here.

    In my office I work with people from four different continents ( north america ( duh ), europe, africa and asia ). Largely christian, but there’s atheists, muslims and hindus as well. Mostly straight ( I guess; it’s work, so it’s not like it comes up a lot ) but there’s a few guys who are open about being gay.

    I know dick about the ethiopian joints in town, but I know they’re around. I know where to go for family run indian food, halal food, kosher food, korean food, japanese food… damn that’s a long list. Lot of different ethnic groups around here.

    I’m hardly the most traveled guy, but I’ve been to a number of different cultures ( asia, africa, middle east and australia ). I know others who have as well, but also those who’ve never left Ohio.

    Your beef that there’s not enough different groups? Too many whites?

    Maybe try checking out some different neighborhoods.

    #392317

    Core_Models
    Member

    If you’ve got the second largest gay population combined with the second largest Somali population, I’d say that right there pretty much ends the “conservative white guys” stereotype.

    ETA: Then throw in the second largest college by enrollment…of course, we could just have a giant number of gay Somali college students.

    #392318

    ja
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>
    If you’ve got the second largest gay population combined with the second largest Somali population, I’d say that right there pretty much ends the “conservative white guys” stereotype.

    The “conservative white guys” still run the city – don’t fool yourself. Have you checked the make-up of the Columbus Partnership lately?

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 227 total)

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