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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 181 through 195 (of 227 total)
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  • #392424

    berdawn
    Member

    Cookie wrote >>

    RoundTowner wrote >>
    You need a course in Diversity, there is nothing wrong with being White, Black or any other race. Only a real Bigot is offended when someone says its ok to be white. Get a grip!!

    Help. Help. Someone’s oppressing stupid people.

    if only.

    #392425

    drew wrote >>

    myliftkk wrote >>
    I’ve never looked at another city’s travel bureau website when actually traveling to that city. I’m much more likely to flip through a hotel’s visitor guidebook.

    Which leads back to Andrew Hall’s question – what is in our citys’ hotel rooms?

    Not my city neighborhood guide.

    #392426

    Here’s one.

    Columbus: Pedicab Capital of the Midwest.

    Yes, I think we can claim that when Chicago lagged a year behind us in this department.

    http://columbus-ite.com/2010/08/06/columbus-pedicab-capital-of-the-midwest/

    #392427
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    drew wrote >>

    myliftkk wrote >>
    I’ve never looked at another city’s travel bureau website when actually traveling to that city. I’m much more likely to flip through a hotel’s visitor guidebook.

    Which leads back to Andrew Hall’s question – what is in our citys’ hotel rooms?

    bedbugs, apparently.

    #392428

    drew
    Participant

    rus wrote >>

    drew wrote >>

    myliftkk wrote >>
    I’ve never looked at another city’s travel bureau website when actually traveling to that city. I’m much more likely to flip through a hotel’s visitor guidebook.

    Which leads back to Andrew Hall’s question – what is in our citys’ hotel rooms?

    bedbugs, apparently.

    Yeah, but how can we get them to promote the city? :-p

    #392429

    JonMyers
    Participant

    myliftkk wrote >>

    drew wrote >>

    joev wrote >>
    Most smart marketers design a web site to speak to their core target markets – From this one, I’d guess EC’s target is families with kids in the household. I’ll bet that’s not an arbitrary choice.
    Most smart marketers also know that an official destination marketing organization web site isn’t the place most affluent, young professionals are going to look for travel information. Which may be why EC is trying to reach that audience through social media rather than its web site.

    I’m not buying that at all. Most smart marketers know that even kids are increasingly discerning in their consumption of marketing messages (they’re inundated with so many of them, they have little choice but to be), and they know that adults with kids still like to think of themselves as adults. Hell, how many convention-goers bring their whole family with them anyhow?!
    And, people without children do still use google. I’ve researched other places to visit, and while the official travel bureau website is far from my end-all-be-all source of info, it’s rare that I don’t at least see it. I doubt I’m alone in that!

    I’ve never looked at another city’s travel bureau website when actually traveling to that city. I’m much more likely to flip through a hotel’s visitor guidebook.

    How you personally seek information is inconsequential in this case.

    What’s being discussed is individuals who have zero clue about Columbus, Ohio and may serendipitously be exposed to it. This article likely sent 30,000 to 100,000 unique visitors to Experience Columbus website. Many of whom probably know absolutely nothing about Columbus.

    When someone clicks on the Experience Columbus link in that NYTime’s article and they arrive at that site, it may very well be the first, and last time they ever interact with or even think about Columbus for that matter.

    There isn’t a thing on that homepage that tells anything unique, or significant about Columbus. The visual identity says nothing about the city and should be an embarrassment.

    There are other organizations competing for the same mindshare as Columbus, other cities. Cities grow by attracting visitors and talent, so when these types of opportunities are wasted Columbus is losing human capital and real $$$.

    Think of these opportunities as a spark. There is no spark there.

    Columbus has a great story, and a niche out there. However if organizations like EC don’t have the right tools in place to tell that story (messaging, visual identity, and site), then it’s extremely difficult to capture mindshare when the competition like Portland has their shit together and are able to capitalize on these press opportunities with better assets.

    If I knew nothing about Columbus and clicked that EC link, there isn’t a damn thing about their site that would prompt me to do further research and consider visiting.

    In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if it had the opposite effect and also reaffirmed a lot of the stereotypes that get Columbusians riled up.

    #392430
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    drew wrote >>

    rus wrote >>

    drew wrote >>

    myliftkk wrote >>
    I’ve never looked at another city’s travel bureau website when actually traveling to that city. I’m much more likely to flip through a hotel’s visitor guidebook.

    Which leads back to Andrew Hall’s question – what is in our citys’ hotel rooms?

    bedbugs, apparently.

    Yeah, but how can we get them to promote the city? :-p

    Slutty bedbugs? :-P

    #392431

    +1 Jon Myers, they need to hire your firm dude.

    #392432

    JonMyers
    Participant

    columbusyuppie wrote >>
    +1 Jon Myers, they need to hire your firm dude.

    Thanks man, I appreciate it.

    The issue is you need a maverick in Experience Columbus who recognizes the value in messaging and branding, who will steam roll the mediocrity mafia who think they get it, who have a lock on messaging in these national press situations.

    #392433

    drew
    Participant

    columbusyuppie wrote >>
    +1 Jon Myers, they need to hire your firm dude.

    Yeah, Jon nailed it. Especially this part:

    “If I knew nothing about Columbus and clicked that EC link, there isn’t a damn thing about their site that would prompt me to do further research and consider visiting.

    In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if it had the opposite effect and also reaffirmed a lot of the stereotypes that get Columbusians riled up.”

    #392434

    JonMyers wrote There are other organizations competing for the same mindshare as Columbus, other cities. Cities grow by attracting visitors and talent, so when these types of opportunities are wasted Columbus is losing human capital and real $$$.

    But, but, but ….

    We don’t give a shit about any of that. If people notice us, it will be horrible and strange scary people will move here, raise our rents and, like, eat us or something.

    A.

    #392435

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Drew, I’m headed to West Africa in January. The thought process to visit started with a conversation with a friend, a spark, which prompted me to check out the website for a music festival outside of Timbuktu.

    The website was decent, and prompted me to do further research.

    If the website for a music festival in the desert outside of Timbuktu can do a better job of communicating than EC that’s issue. lol

    #392436

    myliftkk
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>

    myliftkk wrote >>

    drew wrote >>

    joev wrote >>
    Most smart marketers design a web site to speak to their core target markets – From this one, I’d guess EC’s target is families with kids in the household. I’ll bet that’s not an arbitrary choice.
    Most smart marketers also know that an official destination marketing organization web site isn’t the place most affluent, young professionals are going to look for travel information. Which may be why EC is trying to reach that audience through social media rather than its web site.

    I’m not buying that at all. Most smart marketers know that even kids are increasingly discerning in their consumption of marketing messages (they’re inundated with so many of them, they have little choice but to be), and they know that adults with kids still like to think of themselves as adults. Hell, how many convention-goers bring their whole family with them anyhow?!
    And, people without children do still use google. I’ve researched other places to visit, and while the official travel bureau website is far from my end-all-be-all source of info, it’s rare that I don’t at least see it. I doubt I’m alone in that!

    I’ve never looked at another city’s travel bureau website when actually traveling to that city. I’m much more likely to flip through a hotel’s visitor guidebook.

    That part is inconsequential in this case.
    What’s being discussed is individuals who have zero clue about Columbus, Ohio and may serendipitously be exposed to it. This article likely sent 30,000 to 100,000 unique visitors to Experience Columbus website. Many of whom probably know absolutely nothing about Columbus.
    When someone clicks on the Experience Columbus link in that NYTime’s article and they arrive at that site, it may very well be the first, and last time they ever interact with or even think about Columbus for that matter.
    There isn’t a thing on that homepage that tells anything unique, or significant about Columbus. The visual identity says nothing about the city and should be an embarrassment.
    There are other organizations competing for the same mindshare as Columbus, other cities. Cities grow by attracting visitors and talent, so when these types of opportunities are wasted Columbus is losing human capital and real $$$.
    Think of these opportunities as a spark. There is no spark there.
    Columbus has a great story, and a niche out there. However if organizations like EC don’t have the right tools in place to tell that story (messaging, visual identity, and site), then it’s extremely difficult to capture mindshare when the competition like Portland has their shit together and are able to capitalize on these press opportunities with better assets.
    If I knew nothing about Columbus and clicked that EC link, there isn’t a damn thing about their site that would prompt me to do further research and consider visiting.
    In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if it had the opposite effect and also reaffirmed a lot of the stereotypes that get Columbusians riled up.

    It’s not inconsequential that I don’t ever visit visitor bureau’s. It’s a habit that’s not uncommon among the vast majority of people who travel because there’s some existing connection between them and the place they’re going to. If you want to argue that NYT shouldn’t have even linked to EC, then fine, I’ll buy that. But, perhaps that’s because no one’s created a Columbus-centric popular blog about all the ice cream ridiculousness that goes on here. In that case, the fault isn’t exactly EC’s regardless of how un-web 2.oh-ee their index page is (funnily enough it matches Indy’s almost exactly).

    ECs weakness, and the weakness of visitor bureau sites in general, is that they suffer from “all things to all people” syndrome. There’s no cure for that, technology be damned. I don’t visit NYCs visitor bureau when I want to find industrial clubs to visit in NYC, I hit up someplace like vampirefreaks or people I already know that live in/around the city who share the same interests. Expecting EC to be experts in everything and masters of communication is irresponsible. At their best, they’ll always be generalists, and if industries are sore because EC is not putting the spit shine on their niche in Columbus (or whatever bureau/city) then they may as well look in the mirror and ask themselves why they aren’t doing it themselves. You want to make something happen in this city, you make it happen (and that includes controlling and disseminating your message). It’s that simple.

    You want someone to hand your success on one of these

    it isn’t going to happen.

    You want a city that grew by visitors, take Orlando. Purely visitor oriented growth, it was a orange grove in the 70’s. You know the only reason people visited Orlando in serious numbers, is because Walt built his theme park, the best in the world, there and marketed the shit out of it with his company. Everything else in that town just hopped on his, and later Disney Co.’s, bandwagon. The whole convention center monstrosity that is, I believe, the 2nd largest in the country, OCCC, came about strictly on bed taxes on visitors to Disney and the later parks. There was no government directed, top down, unified push, marketing campaign to make Orlando nearly king of the convention world. It happened on accident because one man turned that place into the location where a huge amount of families took their kids on vacation.

    Could EC do better as a generalist entity, sure, every bureau can. Are they the digital mountain of poo you’re making them out to be, not quite.

    #392437

    myliftkk
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>
    Drew, I’m headed to West Africa in January. The thought process to visit started with a conversation with a friend, a spark, which prompted me to check out the website for a music festival outside of Timbuktu.
    The website was decent, and prompted me to do further research.
    If the website for a music festival in the desert outside of Timbuktu can do a better job of communicating than EC that’s issue. lol

    Of course, one’s enthusiasm might be tempered if they researched this link…

    There is a serious threat of terrorist activities in Mali’s three northern regions (Timbuktu, Gao, and Kidal) as the terrorist group Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) continues to use northern Mali as an active area of operations as well as a safe haven, notably for detaining hostages.

    [url=http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_962.html#crime]US State Department[/url]

    Then again, apparently we’ve got our own Al Queda problems… ;)

    #392438

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Scott, as an example, are Portland and Columbus in competition? I would say yes in many ways they are in competition. Maybe not for the next Longaberger convention, but if the thrust of the article is to be believed they are competing. At least in directly.

    These are some images from Portland’s competing website.

    When you’re competing, you have to present a product (website, identity and message) that best captures your city’s story that is equal or better. I would argue that having no proportionate geographical draw to most competitors Columbus has to work harder, and have an even better product that tells a more compelling story.

    A story that does in fact exist.

    Portland’s site is at least restrained and professional, while still having some of the please everybody and their brother elements that these ding dongs think are important.

    Do I love the messages on the images above? No. Do the images tell me something about Portland? Yes.

    Any one of these images could have been snapped in Columbus. The content of these images are being used to establish an idea in the visiting public’s mind.

    There is a limited window to carve out a niche, and capture mindshare on some of the things people think are unique to Columbus. They’re not unique of course. It’s who owns the message, who gets out there first and who has the right platform to support the message.

    This is why there is urgency from some on this board with these missed opportunities when one of thousands of NYTimes readers visits Experience Columbus site and thousands of opportunities are thrown into a black hole.

Viewing 15 posts - 181 through 195 (of 227 total)

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