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Columbus once again in the New York Times

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus once again in the New York Times

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 227 total)
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  • #392379

    byJody
    Participant

    wassan wrote >>
    Columbus is a darling town, with a lot to offer. Its poorly marketed (as is most of Ohio). However, in my opinion, diversity is SO not one of it’s strong points.

    Hi Wassan – so nice to see you here. I think it is funny you think Columbus is not very diverse, I guess it depends on your benchmark. I’ve lived here my entire life and it is exponentially more diverse and tolerant toward different cultures than in the past. I suppose you have seen more diverse cities, so by comparison it is lacking. For me even visiting sandbox on any day has a diversity of ethnic, lifestyle and racial backgrounds and when I’m there, some age diversity ;) I suppose we still have room for improvement.

    #392380

    drew
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>

    jus10dk wrote >>
    i think part of the work is in branding without excluding… that just makes sense.

    This is why Columbus fails at branding the city.

    Agreed. To benefit everyone in town is not to please everyone in town… but pleasing everyone is what this city reflexively tries to do, and it’s why the branding fails.

    There are some unusually capable people doing very sophisticated branding work in town. They could, on their own, do much better than what has been done. Problem is that they (or people like them) are thrown into groups with scads of other people of varying levels of comparable sophistication, and all are treated as equals. The results look exactly like what you’d expect – a mish mash of messaging, born of compromise, that the creators perceive as saying everything they intend to say but the uninitiated viewer takes as simply being confused and nonsensical, and/or uninteresting.

    #392381

    byJody
    Participant

    drew wrote >>
    I love this quote from the director of Experience Columbus:
    “We are a diverse, youthful, knowledge-based community that is open to new ideas coming in,” Mr. Astleford said. “That has not been the tradition in the Midwest.”
    Now lets look at how EC reflects this very smart and forward-thinking sentiment visually:

    It makes me weep. I can’t imagine how much damage that godforsaken logo has done to perceptions of the city.
    I *suspect* that someone thought that the design was clever in suggesting the architecture of the convention center through color and geometry. It doesn’t – certainly not to anyone who hasn’t seen the convention center, and probably not even to most who have.
    It’s just bad. I’ve seen carny signs I could take more seriously, but this… this represents our city!

    These are the people who were ready to roll out “Not in Columbus” until the local blogosphere gently pointed out the stupidity of the idea.

    #392382

    JonMyers
    Participant

    drew, I think part of the problem is that those running those efforts are by their very nature non-confrontational, non-assertive. Typical khaki corporate types.

    God forbid they have an opinion and actual position on something, which might upset someone else.

    I’ve seen it first hand.

    #392383

    gk
    Member

    ChrisSunami wrote >>
    Although it’s a distinction that has been eclipsed by recent events, Columbus was the first large American city to have a black mayor without a black majority population.

    Actually, Cleveland was the first large American City to elect a black mayor without a black majority population. Carl Stokes was elected in 1967 and began his term as the nation’s first black mayor of one of the top 10 largest cities in the nation on January 1, 1968. Michael Coleman was elected in 1999, some 32 years later.

    #392384

    CooperGuy
    Member

    Interesting and somewhat related story regarding Cincinnati and their “Agenda 360”

    ONN News story

    Agenda 360[/url]

    #392385

    drew
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>
    drew, I think part of the problem is that those running those efforts are by their very nature non-confrontational, non-assertive. Typical khaki corporate types.
    God forbid they have an opinion and actual position on something, which might upset someone else.
    I’ve seen it first hand.

    I don’t doubt that for a second.

    To the extent that I’ve been a party to successful corporate branding projects, the structure of the creative team always struck me as being comparable to a benevolent dictatorship. Everyone contributed creatively in the initial phases, but there was always one person who decided what was worth pulling from the pool of ideas. That same person would oversee the refinement of the selected idea into a finished brand.

    One of the bedrock fundamentals of the process was the understanding that you won’t be able to say everything, and therefore that the goal is to discover and emphasize the most advantageous aspect of a brand and communicate that to its best advantage.

    #392386

    JonMyers
    Participant

    True, I see the roll of designer as taking away features and options, not piling shit upon shit to please everyone who wants to play designer or branding expert in this case.

    #392387

    wassan
    Member

    byJody wrote >>

    wassan wrote >>
    Columbus is a darling town, with a lot to offer. Its poorly marketed (as is most of Ohio). However, in my opinion, diversity is SO not one of it’s strong points.

    Hi Wassan – so nice to see you here. I think it is funny you think Columbus is not very diverse, I guess it depends on your benchmark. I’ve lived here my entire life and it is exponentially more diverse and tolerant toward different cultures than in the past. I suppose you have seen more diverse cities, so by comparison it is lacking. For me even visiting sandbox on any day has a diversity of ethnic, lifestyle and racial backgrounds and when I’m there, some age diversity ;) I suppose we still have room for improvement.

    Jody, my only point was that the diversity in columbus is not unique for a city of its size, therefore highlighting it for a branding or marketing campaign seems facetious. :)

    #392388

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I agree that Columbus is no more or less diverse than any city of similar size (although, I’m really interested in the Census for 2010, skewed as it will be) – but to me it’s more diverse than people (non-Columbusites) *expect* it to be.

    Maybe it’s because of where I live in town, and how I choose to interact with my neighborhood, but compared to other places I’ve lived and visited, Columbus feels very diverse — and like some other folks mentioned, the acceptance of that diversity keeps getting stronger.

    Also – the link earlier to the blog post about the “Not In Columbus” branding presentation was eye opening for me. I agree with that post, now two years old – the idea had great bones, but really half-assed execution, and it was never seen thru to actually being a campaign. It’s a shame – I’d *much* rather see those T-shirts selling at the airport than the friggin’ cow tipping ones.

    #392389

    Columbusite
    Member

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    If you are “engaged in activities which involve getting people and money into CMH” – fine, you’re in marketing, or you’re in tourism, or whatever. There’s nothing wrong with that. We all need jobs. It’s just bullshit to think that because YOU need a slogan for what YOUR business is doing that two million people have to live under a banner with a lame slogan written on it.
    And frankly – I don’t care for that business, I don’t think it helps the community, and I don’t want to live under that banner. Go move to Austin or Portland if you want to live in a city with a slogan, or you can’t work in your field without a slogan.
    It’s also worth considering that if you can’t pull people into town without making up silly names for Columbus that you’re just not good at your job.

    Hit the nail on the head.

    #392390

    Tenzo
    Participant

    Andrew Hall wrote >>
    To add, many of us who are worried about the image of Columbus or selling it are not doing so for ego or other solipsistic reasons. There are genuine, real-world concerns going on.
    A.

    #392391

    thecandlelab
    Participant

    The other problem with complaining about the marketing of our city was hinted at earlier, but its important to remember that there is no one group charged with marketing the city to every available audience.

    There seem to be a lot of shots being taken at Experience Columbus up here. At the end of the day, they are the Convention and Visitors Bureau for Columbus, and are charged with bringing conventions, meetings, and tour groups into town to fill hotel nights. That’s how they are funded, and that’s their mission. And, news flash – they are incredibly good at it. They delivered 9 bus-loads of out-of-town visitors to my front door this year through no effort on my part.

    I’m sorry if their logo or their marketing approach doesn’t attract the creative class to come live and work here, but that is not even close to their scope of work. They are exceedingly good at what they are supposed to do, and its someone else’s job to convince your friends that Columbus is cool enough for them to come visit you.

    #392392

    JonMyers
    Participant

    #392393
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Actually, Cleveland was the first large American City to elect a black mayor without a black majority population. Carl Stokes was elected in 1967 and began his term as the nation’s first black mayor of one of the top 10 largest cities in the nation on January 1, 1968. Michael Coleman was elected in 1999, some 32 years later.

    I stand corrected.

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