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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 61 total)
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  • #278290

    ehill27
    Participant

    Outstanding!

    Is there a timeline on this? Is funding available to proceed?

    #278291

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    I’m excited about the expansion plans finally getting underway, but I wish the museum had been more creative with where they were expanding, and not so eager to eliminate the Russel Page-designed sculpture garden.

    The expansion could have gone to the rear of the building, or to the side facing 9th st instead of that wheelchair ramp they keep trying to pass off as a “garden.”

    That is no replacement.

    It’s a shame we are going to lose a real piece of art and only gain a very generic ‘floating box’ glass/funky window placement addition, which could have gone anywhere.

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/editorials/2012/06/20/art-museums-garden-deserves-better-fate.html

    Do people realize that Russell Page was a famous British landscape designer? That the garden is one of only two museum gardens he designed in the United States (the other is at the Frick in New York City)? That the former Columbus museum director, Budd Harris Bishop, made acquiring a Page-designed garden a challenge and a grand success for the museum and the city?

    http://www.greatbritishgardens.co.uk/russell_page.htm

    #278292

    geoyui
    Participant

    heresthecasey said:
    I’m excited about the expansion plans finally getting underway, but I wish the museum had been more creative with where they were expanding, and not so eager to eliminate the Russel Page-designed sculpture garden.

    The expansion could have gone to the rear of the building, or to the side facing 9th st instead of that wheelchair ramp they keep trying to pass off as a “garden.”

    That is no replacement.

    It’s a shame we are going to lose a real piece of art and only gain a very generic ‘floating box’ glass/funky window placement addition, which could have gone anywhere.

    http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/editorials/2012/06/20/art-museums-garden-deserves-better-fate.html

    Do people realize that Russell Page was a famous British landscape designer? That the garden is one of only two museum gardens he designed in the United States (the other is at the Frick in New York City)? That the former Columbus museum director, Budd Harris Bishop, made acquiring a Page-designed garden a challenge and a grand success for the museum and the city?

    http://www.greatbritishgardens.co.uk/russell_page.htm

    After reading about the garden, it is a shame it will be lost. I would have to wonder why it wasn’t placed in the rear, but I’m assuming that is because decision makers wanted this expansion to be visible from the front entrance. With a brand new garden on the west side (9th) and the historical Russel Page garden on the east, I wonder how they came to decide which garden to sacrifice.

    I personally do like the design and I’m glad to see it come to fruition, but it is unfortunate the loss of the garden.

    #278293
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    heresthecasey said:
    I’m excited about the expansion plans finally getting underway, but I wish the museum had been more creative with where they were expanding, and not so eager to eliminate the Russel Page-designed sculpture garden.

    According to a comment from Michael Bongiorno, there was no eagerness to eliminate the garden, nor was it actually designed by Russel Page:

    Columbus Museum of Art Reveals Major Expansion Plans

    #278294

    geoyui
    Participant

    I wasn’t sure who’s “salesmanship” I should believe (CMA old or CMA new) in terms of whether the garden is an original design or not. The only thing I could find online is this page, referenced on wikipedia:

    Russell Page Bio

    It lists only 8 garden designs by Page. Most are in Europe, 1 in NY and the other in DC.

    Nonetheless, I’m very excited to see this built.

    #278295

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    @Walker,

    I do appreciate Mike’s response that the decision was not taken lightly. As only viewing this from the outside, the location presented along Washington has been a constant in plans released to the public since the beginning, so I’m heartened to see there was at least some real discussion taking place behind the scenes on whether it was the right move.

    In regards to whether or not it was designed by Page, I’d like to hear more of Mike’s knowledge on the topic. It certainly was done by his practice, and has always been credited to him. Here’s a quote from Page’s monograph that deals with the CMA,

    Budd Harris Bishop, the director of the Columbus Museum of Art, was so impressed by Page’s courtyard jewel for the Frick Collection that he commissioned the Englishman to make a garden for his museum in 1977. Aside from quick day trips to Columbus, often stopping off on the way in St Louis or New York, Page worked on the design primarily from photographs and drawings. By letter he admonished Museum staff not to change his carefully calculated plans. The simple, elegant walled garden, with a rectangular pool and a rectangle of grass set in paving stones and gravel, opened to the public in June 1979. It was a fine addition to the museum.

    It is also listed in his official oeuvre among major works completed,

    [b]1978[/b] Designs a sculpture garden for the Columbus Museum of Art, and a garden for Thomas Vaal of Cleveland, Ohio.

    More here, Pages 223 and 227 in particular, http://www.amazon.com/Gardens-Russell-Page-Gabrielle-Zuylen/dp/0711226946

    I am excited to see the museum construct an addition, even a “contemporary” one like this. The space is much needed, I’m just a little sore over the location due to a personal attachment with the current garden.

    #278296

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    A little more background,

    [b]RENOVATION OF GARDEN FINALLY REACHES FRUITION[/b]
    The Columbus Dispatch, Sunday, July 12, 1992
    By Karen Kakascik, Dispatch Society Reporter

    Museum volunteers Sally Morris and Connie Page were leaders in the effort to raise funds for renovation of the garden, designed by British garden architect Russell Page.

    Insufficient funds in 1979, when the garden was installed, prevented the full implementation of Page’s scheme. The sculpture garden is the only public Page garden in Ohio. Page’s other clients have included Babe Paley and the Duke of Windsor.

    Among the improvements to the garden are refurbishing of the reflecting pool, replacement of walkways and a rose garden.

    And some more,

    [b]SCULPTURE GARDEN AT ART MUSEUM RESTORED[/b]
    The Columbus Dispatch, Friday, June 18, 1993
    By Michael Leach, Dispatch Garden Reporter

    Restoring a work of art usually requires delicate brushes, not shovels, pruning shears and lawn mowers.

    But refurbishing the Sculpture Garden at the Columbus Museum of Art took muscle, not just attention to detail.

    The garden is living artwork designed as a setting for sculpture, concerts and social functions. Ups and downs in the museum budget had led to erratic maintenance and a decline in the garden, which was installed in 1979.

    The designer was the late Russell Page , a renowned English garden designer whose other gardens include the Frick Museum in New York and the Festival Gardens in London.

    His concepts, often sketched on napkins and the backs of envelopes, were translated into working plans by Marion V. Packard, a retired Columbus landscape architect and faculty member of Ohio State University’s School of Landscape Architecture for 26 years.

    A lot of correspondence passed between London and Columbus during the planning process, Packard recalled.

    Those original plans were used for the restoration by Schmidt Nursery, which also is donating ongoing maintenance.

    The revival was prompted by the coming of AmeriFlora ’92 and the opening of the Sirak Collection at the museum . Another prod was publication of The Gardens of Russell Page . The Columbus garden, one of only three of Page’s U.S. works open to the public, is mentioned in the book.

    Plants were replaced with types specified by Page, except in a few cases where better cultivars have been developed. Also added was rose trelliswork, part of the original plan that was never installed.

    As recently as a decade ago the museum still understood what a treasure this was to have, even hosting a lecture entitled “Russell Page : Preserving a Legacy” and mounting a fundraising campaign for the garden itself.

    [b]RENEWAL OF A RARITY – Museum takes initial steps toward refurbishing Sculpture Garden[/b]
    The Columbus Dispatch, Thursday, February 1, 2001
    By Nancy Gilson ; Dispatch Assistant Arts Editor

    A jewel of a garden, created by one of the most illustrious designers of the 20th century, lies dormant and unvisited during the winter at the Columbus Museum of Art.

    Yet the serene space, about a third of an acre nestled at the east end of the 480 E. Broad St. building, needs more than higher temperatures and sunshine to blossom.

    The Russell Page Sculpture Garden, which opened in 1979, needs a refurbishing, to which a group of museum enthusiasts is devoted.

    The recently revived Garden Club has organized a four-part lecture series, beginning Sunday with an appearance by Galen Lee of the Frick Museum in New York.

    Proceeds from the series, sponsored by Schieber & Associates Architectural Gardens, will be used to freshen the Sculpture Garden.

    “It’s a fabulous space. It deserves this new attention,” said Irvin Lippman, executive director of the museum .

    Stephanie Southard, treasurer of the Garden Club and organizer of the series, sees the first lecture, ” Russell Page : Preserving a Legacy,” as appropriate.

    “That’s what we’re trying to do,” she said.

    The Sculpture Garden, commissioned by Budd H. Bishop when he directed the museum , was implemented by Marion V. Packard, a Columbus landscape architect who was associated with the Ohio State University program in landscape architecture.

    Today, the garden ranks as one of only 13 documented Page projects in the United States and three in Ohio. (The others are in Cleveland.)

    Page, whose career lasted more than 50 years, is considered one of the foremost designers of gardens in the 20th century.

    Unlike the Columbus garden, his only other museum design — the Courtyard Garden at the Frick Museum — cannot be walked through, only viewed from the street.

    “Page was very specific about the individual design element,” Lee said. “He called himself a gardener, not a garden designer, and he believed you had to have your hands in the soil from the beginning in order to be a good garden designer.”

    The Sculpture Garden is typical of his work, said Louisa Green, head of publications and archives, and staff director for the long-range plan.

    The Page garden has interested her for some time.

    “It has a tapis vert (green lawn), reflecting pool, long sightline and wrought-iron gates that enclose the garden but through which you can see to Broad Street, giving it an urban vista,” she said.

    Page favored indigenous plantings and especially Iceberg roses, which bloom from early spring to late fall.

    “But he didn’t like to juxtapose flowers and sculpture,” Green said, “and, since this was a sculpture garden, he didn’t put in a lot of flowers.”

    When the garden was installed, Bishop borrowed sculptures from New York’s Museum of Modern Art while a renovation was continuing on the sculpture garden there.

    The Sculpture Garden, though a success when it opened, gradually fell victim to wear and tear, and a lack of money for maintenance.

    The first refurbishing was sparked by AmeriFlora ’92: A partial irrigation system was installed and the pool cleared and repaired.

    Years have passed, and again, like any other, the garden needs attention.

    “I don’t think it’s been ignored in the past decade,” Lippman said, “but there are always so many priorities at the museum . Now it’s time to face what could be one of the most distinguished gardens in Columbus.”

    Page, who was born in England in 1906, began working on gardens in the 1930s, designing large and complex spaces for public grounds and estates. He later engaged in wartime intelligence in Africa, where he found time to study regional gardens.

    “After World War II,” Lee said, “he changed his philosophy and started doing smaller gardens with a distinctive Islamic quality — incorporating more water, more paving and a more modern feeling, which is probably the inspiration for your garden there.

    “There are very few of his gardens in the United States, and some of them are already lost.”

    In 1985, Page died at age 78 in London.

    Too few people know his work, Southard said; the lecture series, and particularly the Lee talk, is designed to spread the word.

    Meanwhile, Urban Environments, a central Ohio company, has researched the Sculpture Garden and created preliminary plans.

    “The idea is to conserve the garden rather than to redo it,” Green said.

    “Page was one of the major garden architects of the 20th century,” Southard said. “This is something we can value.”

    #278297

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    And one last one, complete with gushing quote of the garden’s value from the museum’s previous director, calling it “the centerpiece for the museum that it was really meant to be” and “the realization of Russell Page’s dream.”

    [b]SERIES SPOTLIGHTS RENOVATION OF SCULPTURE GARDEN[/b]
    The Columbus Dispatch, Friday, February 1, 2002
    By Nancy Gilson ; Dispatch Assistant Arts Editor

    The sculpture garden, at the east side of the museum , serves as the focal point of a $250,000 renovation. Museum Executive Director Irvin Lippman said the renovation is a “fulfillment” of the garden’s original design. “Even when it opened in 1979, parts of this garden never were realized,” he said. “The bones of this garden are terrific. We’re looking to fulfill the realization of Russell Page ‘s dream.”

    Lippman said that the refurbishment will be part of a larger landscaping project. Recently, board members heard a proposal to change the north entrance, eliminating the current back door and routing visitors through the garden.

    “That would be making the Russell Page Garden the centerpiece for the museum that it was really meant to be,” Lippman said.

    #278298

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    Council, Library each vote unanimously to enable purchase of Deaf School
    Monday, Jan. 28

    Columbus City Council voted unanimously to remove the residential zoning restriction on the old Ohio State School for the Deaf property, 400 E. Town St., to allow for possible redevelopment by the Columbus Metropolitan Library (CML).

    Today, CML’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously to purchase the 2.24-acre Deaf School property for $2,160,000, located between Topiary Park and Main Library, 96 S. Grant Ave.

    “Our library is essentially landlocked,” said Patrick Losinski, CEO of CML. “This land provides us more options to expand and improve Main Library and its offerings.”

    Inspired by Bryant Park in New York, CML looks to provide an outdoor reading room and green space for library customers by connecting Main Library to Topiary Park via the old Deaf School land.

    Cristo Rey Columbus High School has shown interest in redeveloping the building on the acquired property as a college preparatory high school.

    #278299

    News
    Participant

    #278300

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:
    CMA TO BREAK GROUND ON NEW WING

    (Columbus, OH) – The Columbus Museum of Art’s Board of Trustees unanimously voted last night in favor of beginning construction of the Museum’s new wing. The project will kick off with a community celebration and ground breaking ceremony on August 22 at 5:00 PM. Construction of the new wing marks the third and final phase of the Museum’s Art Matters renovation and expansion project.

    “The past several years at the Museum have been marked by exciting growth and tangible change,” said Jay Vorys, President, CMA Board of Trustees. “After an extended period of thoughtful study and deliberation, the Board of Trustees were united in authorizing the commencement of construction of the new building. The Board believes that the decision is a significant milestone in the rich history of CMA and an important development for our city, county and region.”

    “This is an incredibly powerful moment for the Museum,” said Nannette V. Maciejunes, CMA’s Executive Director. “The new wing will allow us to better serve our community, but more importantly, it is a reflection of the importance Columbus and the Franklin County community places on the arts.”

    The $37.6 million project encompasses major renovations to the Ross Wing and lobby area the Museum added in 1974 and the construction of a new wing. These changes will result in a unique meeting and special event complex, as well as new Gallery spaces to showcase the Museum’s permanent collection and expanded space for high-profile traveling exhibitions.

    Columbus-based architecture firm DesignGroup led by award-winning architect Michael Bongiorno, a graduate of the prestigious Pratt Institute School of Architecture, is spearheading the project. Recognized for the talent, experience, and innovation applied to successful local and regional urban projects, Bongiorno specializes in the design of civic facilities, cultural destinations, and residential mixed-use communities. His recent projects include the Grange Insurance Audubon Center, the Peggy R. McConnell Arts Center of Worthington, the Columbus West Family Health Center, and Goodwill Columbus’ Headquarters.

    Also committed to the project is Corna Kokosing Construction Company. A partner on the previous two phases of the CMA’s construction, Corna has long been a part of the Museum family and the Columbus community. It has a long history of being a loyal supporter of the arts and Mark Corna, president, has personally been a vital member of the Columbus arts community for many years. Corna is committed to improving their industry, community, and the environment. Not only have they constructed or renewed many of the landmark buildings in the area, but also they have become active participants in many charitable and cultural events that mark the fabric of our city.

    The first phase of the capital portion of CMA’s Art Matters endowment and capital campaign was the renovation and repurposing of Beaton Hall. The building now houses 85 percent of the Museum staff, thereby expanding public space in the Museum. The project was completed in September, 2009, on time and on budget.

    The second phase was the renovation of the Museum’s historic Broad Street building, now named the Elizabeth M. and Richard M. Ross Building, which was unveiled to the public January 1, 2011. The project, which was also completed on time and on budget, included: the transformation Derby Court by raising the floor to improve accessibility, installing a luminous skylight, and improving acoustics; reimagining the entire first floor as a Center for Creativity; renovating, installing new seating, and improving acoustics in the auditorium; and performing upgrades to make the building more accessible for all visitors.

    In June, 2012, the Columbus Museum of Art, in partnership with the City of Columbus and Columbus Recreation and Parks, opened its new West Garden. The garden, designed by MSI Design, an award-winning planning, urban design, landscape architecture and entertainment design firm with offices in Ohio, Florida and California, is a gateway entry experience to the Museum and includes an ADA accessible walkway from the street to the entrance. The garden will provide a safe drop-off point for school and group tours and will be the sole ADA accessible entrance to the Museum during the renovation of the Museum’s 1970s addition and construction of its new wing. The garden is free and accessible to the general public during regular Museum hours.

    The Columbus Museum of Art creates great experiences with great art for everyone. The Greater Columbus Arts Council, Nationwide Foundation, Ohio Arts Council, and the Charlotte R. Haller, Lewis K. Osborne, and Robert B. Hurst funds of The Columbus Foundation provide ongoing support. CMA and the Museum Store are open Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 AM to 5:30 PM, and until 8:30 PM every Thursday. The Palette Express is open Tuesday through Friday from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM and 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM Saturday and Sunday. For additional information, call 614.221.4848 or visit http://www.columbusmuseum.org.

    #278301

    News
    Participant

    Groundbreaking: The Columbus Museum of Art Expansion
    Published on August 23, 2013 10:45 am
    By: Jeff Regensburger

    The Columbus Museum of Art has made a name for itself by offering innovative programs and providing a unique and experiential space for visitors. This focus on visitor engagement, along with a commitment to education and the community, were cited as key factors when the Museum was awarded the 2013 National Medal for Museum and Library Service. If there were concerns the Museum would now rest on its laurels, those were put to rest Thursday evening when they pulled out all the stops for the groundbreaking of their new wing.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/groundbreaking-the-columbus-museum-of-art-expansion-jr1

    #278302

    News
    Participant

    FROM HERE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/design-digest-designgroup-bw1

    While we have been asked to keep the news of some projects confidential for now, we are very, very excited to share that we will be serving our customers and Columbus through some new high-profile local, community-impacting projects. One notable project that is just now breaking ground is our striking and innovative design for the expansion of the Columbus Museum of Art.

    #278303

    News
    Participant

    Updating an Icon: Columbus Museum of Art
    BY KRISTEN SCHMIDT

    You expect to hear lofty terms like “cinematic experience” and “shard of light” in proximity to an art museum—but when architect Michael Bongiorno uses them, he’s referring to the building, not the art inside. Bongiorno led the team that designed the striking contemporary addition to the Columbus Museum of Art, adding 50,000 square feet of gallery and event space and bringing the museum experience into the 21st century. The big unveil is expected in fall 2015, but until then the project will unfold before the city’s eyes along Broad Street. We asked Bongiorno for a peek at the vision behind the changes. columbusmuseum.org

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusmonthly.com/October-2013/Updating-an-Icon-Columbus-Museum-of-Art/

    #278304
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Little photo update on construction from today. Moving right along!

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 61 total)

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