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Issue 4: Columbus Metropolitan Library Levy

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Issue 4: Columbus Metropolitan Library Levy

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Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 107 total)
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  • #390987

    chaptal
    Participant

    Very cool Ohio digital collections from CML[/url]Digital downloads from CML

    They’re already there.

    I also have problems with CMl’s focus on latchkey and other tolerance issues. But for $11.59 a month, which would increase to around $15 a month for me, I’ll accept it for all the positive services CML offers now and in the future.

    #390988

    cc
    Member

    I am not saying that the non-library functions are not valuable, I just think it may be time to redefine what libraries are (it seems to vary greatly) and also to maximize the potential of the digital libraries (inexpensive and more universal access to an immense storehouse of literature).

    #390989

    Twixlen
    Participant

    rus wrote >>
    DavidF: Glad we can both agree on the ‘vox populi, vox dei’ sentiment.
    Devil’s advocate: What is the benefit of a library or museum to someone who never uses them?
    “A better society” is a little amorphous. Better how and to what degree? Is there some measurement? Or is the measurement dependent on the definition of “society”?

    This is one of those things that’s nearly impossible to truly extrapolate out a monetary, or some measureable metric. But – here’s what I think about it, from a purely gut-level human standpoint –

    Let’s say a young kid spends most of every day, all summer in the library. This kid discovers books, and a lifelong quest for knowledge begins. So instead of that kid/girl getting pregnant at 16, and ending up in the system, she graduates and becomes a contributing member of society. Or, let’s say she DOES get pregnant, but takes HER kid to the library, as that love of books never waned. So it’s HER kid that could ultimately break free.

    Or maybe someone looking for a job is too intimidated by the state/county run job seeking programs, and heads to their neighborhood library for some assistance, ultimately landing a job.

    Or a vision impaired person who can get large print books… a senior citizen on a tight budget with little other opportunity for social contact…

    There are a thousand scenarios that could potentially be played out.

    I don’t know how to quantify that into a pie chart, or into a monetary value. Not every person who uses the library will take the opportunity to actually learn something – and again, where would that kid be, if not hanging out in the library? Get 3-5 kids together, out roaming the ‘hood, and it’s rarely a good thing.

    I don’t understand why something has to be measurable, always – doing something that benefits someone else doesn’t necessarily need to also benefit me, measurably. With only one cup of coffee down, I can’t seem to quite express it – but being positive and having positive impact outside of ourselves benefits the environment in which we live. That spirit of volunteerism, etc…

    #390990
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Twixlen wrote >>

    I don’t understand why something has to be measurable, always – doing something that benefits someone else doesn’t necessarily need to also benefit me, measurably. With only one cup of coffee down, I can’t seem to quite express it – but being positive and having positive impact outside of ourselves benefits the environment in which we live. That spirit of volunteerism, etc…

    Two separate thoughts there:

    Why something should be measurable: If there’s a benefit, how do you know? How much of a benefit? Is it worth the cost, or is the money better spent elsewhere?

    Take pregnancy prevention as in your example: is a library the most effective means or would subsidized depo shots at school reduce teen pregnancy more?

    As to “benefiting the environment in which we live”: If you believe X will benefit your environment, then to some degree that benefits you provided you see your environment as part of your self interest.

    #390991

    Twixlen
    Participant

    rus wrote >>

    Twixlen wrote >>
    Take pregnancy prevention as in your example: is a library the most effective means or would subsidized depo shots at school reduce teen pregnancy more?

    Well – I think those should happen to — but the pregnancy example was meant to be more about choices. Learning improves choices. Knowledge is power and all that.

    I get that there has to be some measurable, tangible benefit/cost/whatnot – but your question seemed more to me about the societal measure. And I don’t know that you could measure that without completely eradicating the library system, and living with that for a while, before reinstating, and then creating the measure. I think it’s that integral in to the overall fabric.

    #390992
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    rus wrote >>
    hell, I spend more per year on chocolates for the cleaning staff ), but I do not use them ( same way with zoos, museums, etc. ). They vanish tomorrow and my life would not change.

    I think what you mean is that your life wouldn’t change in an immediate, directly noticeable way. I think there’s definitely an enlightened self-interest argument to be made that your life is better in a city with a strong library even if you yourself never use it.

    joev
    I don’t think many (or any) people are saying that libraries aren’t important. My point is that we’re clearly at a point (because they’re asking for a lot more money from us) when we can no longer afford to maintain the best library system in the nation.

    I understand the argument that it’s not all or nothing. But I do think there’s a value –probably a monetary value if you wanted to put it in those terms –in terms of city image, public relations and attracting and retaining citizens –in having the best library, not the second, third or fourth best.

    #390993

    dirtgirl
    Participant

    alison wrote >>
    dirtgirl — are you sure you pay $600 a year for the library?
    Admittedly, my house is worth a mere 100K, but according to the county auditor’s website, I’m only paying $23.18 for the library, a smidge less than I pay for the Metroparks.

    No, I was going by the original poster who said that the 0.6 mil increase would be another $5.24 PER MONTH per $100K of home value. If that were true, then including the underlying 2.2 mils and a $200K home, with the increase it’d be $600 per year. But you’re right, the auditor’s site (which I’d never checked before) says I’m currently paying $50.

    The original article has me really confused, but if the amounts are really in the realm of $50 and not $600, I think that’s a much more reasonable amounts. The MRDD levy of $400, on the other hand, yeeouch!

    #390994

    I think this is an important thread, that’s why I’m posting here for the first time. The responses in this thread are mixed between those seeing the “bigger picture” regarding what the library provides to all of the community and those worrying about the cost of something they don’t use. I can’t speak to either viewpoint, but I can give you real examples of why CML is important in our community and how its changed lives for the better.

    I worked at CML over 14 years ago (and moved on reluctantly because I needed to earn a living wage), and I interacted directly with the public on many levels. Yes, we did have many people who used us to babysit their children. Yes, we did have many people who used us as a “Blockbuster” alternative, but a large volume of people used the library as an outlet to expand and totally change their lives.

    I can’t tell you how many people told me that the resources of the library helped further their education. I can’t tell you how many people told me that they found their job utilizing library resources. I can’t tell you how many people gained interaction, socialization and soothed the loneliness of their lives through interactions with library staff, especially Outreach services.

    I had one lady tell me that I was instrumental in helping her get her non-fiction book published and that I would be listed in the book’s dedication.

    The staff of CML has always been some of the most helpful and caring people I’ve ever encountered.

    Our community and these caring people who have contributed so much to the betterment of many, should not be punished because we don’t want to spend the same amount of money that most people “drop” at Starbucks in 2 weeks. Get out and vote this November for the levy.

    #390995

    mr.thingy
    Member

    Library ROI (return on investment) calculator.

    #390996
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Official Info up at the LWVCOLS:

    Issue 4: Columbus Metropolitan Library Levy

    Replacement and increase: Replacement of 2.2 mills with an increase of 0.6 mill to constitute a tax of 2.8 mills, $0.28 per $100 valuation, for a continuing period of time, commencing in 2010.

    READ MORE: http://www.lwvcols.org/theleague/displaynews.php?id=307

    #390997

    If you don’t go to the library and you don’t like to read, that’s totally your right! Just don’t drag the entire city down the rabbit hole of illiteracy behind you.

    If you’re a non-reader I feel obligated to point out that CML has an excellent collection of picture books and board books which will resist the clenched fists and rippy-page hands of even the strongest library-fighter.

    #390998

    Tenzo
    Participant

    drewtoothpaste wrote >>
    If you don’t go to the library and you don’t like to read, that’s totally your right! Just don’t drag the entire city down the rabbit hole of illiteracy behind you.
    .

    I learned to read in school.

    Libraries are valuable. But the “were all gunna die! armageddon!’
    argument only pushes me the other way.

    #390999

    BCNation
    Participant

    joev wrote >>
    I think there are a lot of ways the library could save money – for instance – there’s a branch on Parsons in Merion Village that’s less than a mile from the Main Library. I live closer to the Parsons branch, but have never used it, because I can walk to the Main Library in about 20 minutes and get a better selection of books. While it would be a shame to have another empty building on Parsons, I don’t see a good reason to maintain a branch there.

    I live in walking distance from three libraries (Main, MLK, and Driving Park) and a fourth library not in the CML system. In middle and high school, it took me about 15 minutes to walk to MLK or 15 minutes to walk to Driving Park. And it takes me about 30 minutes to walk to the Main branch, which has pretty much everything.

    #391000

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    “Looks like we got ourselves a reader”

    #391001

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    As much as I do like and do want to help support the library. I think I am going to have to vote against this levy. I know they have been holding back the budget, and I’m open to giving them an increase. It’s just that I think the amount that they are asking for, to be increased permanently is unreasonable.

    A homeowner with a home appraised at $100,000 is currently paying approximately $22.92 and would pay approximately $85.75 if the levy were passed.

    That is 3.75 times as much money that they would be getting than what they are currently collecting. Completely unreasonable in my opinion for a permanent increase. Are they planning on providing almost 4 times the level of services they currently are now? I don’t think so.

    I would be more inclined to support either a permanent smaller increase (say maybe twice what they are collecting now, at most), or a larger, temporary increase that was going toward funding some major expansion (say an enlargement of the main library to engage the Topiary Park).

    As it stands though I am voting against this levy. I hope the board will come back in the next election with a more reasonable proposal.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 107 total)

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