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Columbus Economy - News & Updates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus Economy – News & Updates

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 82 total)
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  • #529478

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    Walker was referencing a comment about Kasich and why he may not get all the credit for Columbus’ success since the state is struggling. You are saying that Columbus, with it’s unwalkable neighborhoods, limited amenities and inability to do what other great cities are doing, is benefiting from a struggling state.

    Is Ohio struggling all that much now?

    #529479

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    columbusmike said:
    I wouldn’t say WalMart is that much different than, say, Target, BestBuy, Kroger, or any other big box store. They just happened to be the first to proliferate the big box concept around America to the detriment of small business, communities, and real jobs.

    No argument that they don’t have company in some of the practices, but they are a lightning rod for controversy for a reason. While all big box stores have serious issues, Wal-Mart has always been unique in their role as the worst offender by far.

    #529480

    These are urban cities, you guys don’t sound intelligent by making that case. 90% of urban metro cities in the country have democrat mayors.. so this list is no different from the norm… The governors of an overwhelmingly majority of the states these cities reside in are FISCALLY CONSERVATIVE REPUBLICANS

    Coremodels said:
    Took it a bit further out. 12 of the top 15 actually.

    #529481
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    RealEstateAcademia said:
    These are urban cities, you guys don’t sound intelligent by making that case. 90% of urban metro cities in the country have democrat mayors.. so this list is no different from the norm… The governors of an overwhelmingly majority of the states these cities reside in are FISCALLY CONSERVATIVE REPUBLICANS

    Perhaps you’re looking for a list of States by strongest economy then…see, this list is cities.

    #529482

    geoyui
    Participant

    RealEstateAcademia said:
    The governors president of the united states of an overwhelmingly majority of all the states these cities reside in are FISCALLY CONSERVATIVE REPUBLICANS is a democrat.

    Does it really matter?

    #529483

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    Columbus has had a fairly strong economy for most of its existence, even before these other cities began to have issues. That’s not going to suddenly not be true anymore if Cleveland gets its act together.

    And 99% of the Sun Belt’s attraction has been economy, with the 1% weather. Strong economies attract people and always will, regardless of how the neighbors are doing.

    I think Columbus has certainly benefited in many respects from the struggles of Cleveland, Cincinnati, Akron, Toledo, Dayton, Canton, Mansfield, Springfield, Lima and Youngstown. Lots of people, particularly young adults, college students, creatives and professionals in their 20s and 30s have flocked here to escape limited economic prospects in their home regions, and that has certainly contributed to this city’s youthful and vibrant atmosphere. None of the other cities in this state can boast similar demographics and culture. This makes a huge, huge difference.

    At the same time, Columbus is also held back by the fact that the rest of the state is struggling and going nowhere fast. How many people and businesses don’t even give Ohio a second look, regardless of what is going on in Columbus because the state as a whole is mired in a mix of rural/reactionary anti-governance attitudes, post-industrial decay, and corruption all around? Even our statewide population is on the verge of decline for the first time ever.

    The ideal situation would be one in which all 3Cs–Cleveland, Columbus and Cincy–plus Toledo, Akron, Dayton, etc. are all thriving at once. I don’t think this would hurt Columbus at all but would help it even more than the current statewide setup is doing. Maybe we could even build some kind of economic synergy between the 3C regions? Someday and some other governor, maybe. I do think at a local level though, Mayor Coleman, other local leaders in government, communities, and business, and their predecessors deserve most of the credit for Columbus’ current success story.

    #529484
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    RealEstateAcademia said:
    These are urban cities, you guys don’t sound intelligent by making that case. 90% of urban metro cities in the country have democrat mayors.. so this list is no different from the norm… The governors of an overwhelmingly majority of the states these cities reside in are FISCALLY CONSERVATIVE REPUBLICANS

    Apparently math is hard. I stopped at the top 50, but out of the top 50 there are 23 Governors represented…14 of which are Republicans.

    That’s about 60%…not 90%. (also the percentage of Governors who are Republicans overall, btw)

    #529485

    myliftkk
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    And 99% of the Sun Belt’s attraction has been economy, with the 1% weather. Strong economies attract people and always will, regardless of how the neighbors are doing.

    Huh? That certainly depends on the portion of the Sun Belt you’re looking at.

    Also, if the weather drives tourism, and tourism drives many southern economies (which it does), then you could say the weather drives most of the attraction.

    #529486

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    Huh? That certainly depends on the portion of the Sun Belt you’re looking at.

    Also, if the weather drives tourism, and tourism drives many southern economies (which it does), then you could say the weather drives most of the attraction.

    Economics will trump weather every time, unless you are retired and no longer care about the jobs picture. Most people don’t move specifically because of climate. It’s a bonus at best. And if weather was the #1 reason, why wasn’t the Sun Belt heavily populated from the beginning? It took A/C to get people to move, which to me implies the weather kind of sucks there as well, even given more sunshine.

    #529487
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    One thing on the whole “Credit the Governor” issue, I would consider one exception to that.

    Texas is clearly doing something right at a statewide level to have 4 slots in the top 21.

    #529488

    myliftkk
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    Economics will trump weather every time, unless you are retired and no longer care about the jobs picture. Most people don’t move specifically because of climate. It’s a bonus at best. And if weather was the #1 reason, why wasn’t the Sun Belt heavily populated from the beginning? It took A/C to get people to move, which to me implies the weather kind of sucks there as well, even given more sunshine.

    The fixed income retirees move for the economy?

    A/C made it habitable indoors in the SE (the southwest didn’t have the same issue). Once that happened, it was all about the mild weather (which was why tourism is so heavy). Do you have any idea how someplace like “Sunny FL” or “Sunny CA” was sold to northerners in its heyday of land scams?

    Carving a veritable suburban paradise out of the swamp….

    Florida’s economy is hugely weighted to service industry jobs, which is why it tanked in the recession. Service industry jobs don’t exist before there are people to service.

    #529489

    InnerCore
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:

    And your premise that Columbus’ economy is only strong because everyone around them is failing may be the most ridiculous thing you’ve said yet.

    That’s not my argument. My argument is that Columbus has relatively more JOBS due to many reasons that include “a recession-proof industry in state government, a research engine in Ohio State, a central location at the hub of the state’s other urban centers. And it’s fast becoming a regional center for financial and business services.”

    http://www.techcolumbus.org/economy-rebounds-columbus-leads-state-jobs-growth

    As a result you have people moving from neighboring cities that have fewer jobs which is helping us grow. So I’m not saying Columbus is strong because other people are moving here, I’m saying people are moving here because Columbus is strong.

    But that is the primary reason. People aren’t living in Cincinnati or Cleveland and saying “man I need to move to Columbus because its so cool”. They’re moving to find a job, any job.

    #529490

    gramarye
    Participant

    I don’t see the struggles of smaller central Ohio county capitals, or of Cincinnati and Cleveland (to the extent that they really are struggling … Cleveland in particular is doing pretty well), to be net positives for Columbus. For one thing, one of the major employers in Columbus is the state government and it is heavily dependent on the fiscal health of the entire state. For another, as was already mentioned, the perception of the state as a whole matters for attracting jobs to Columbus; even if we might feasibly argue that we’re the exception to the rule against the backdrop of a struggling state, it’s far more powerful to be able to position ourselves as the leader of a powerful pack.

    #529491

    InnerCore
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    Columbus has had a fairly strong economy for most of its existence, even before these other cities began to have issues. That’s not going to suddenly not be true anymore if Cleveland gets its act together.

    I don’t disagree that Columbus’ economy will probably remain steady. But without the people moving in from surrounding areas there wouldn’t be much growth.

    href=”https://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/columbus-is-nations-fourth-strongest-economy/page/2#post-481145″>said:
    And 99% of the Sun Belt’s attraction has been economy, with the 1% weather. Strong economies attract people and always will, regardless of how the neighbors are doing.

    Having a strong economy is a relative term. If all the economies in Ohio were the same as Columbus would it still be strong? No it would be average. Which is why Columbus’ doesn’t attract people from places other than struggling Midwest cities. Furthermore would people leave their families in Cincinnati to move to Columbus for the same job opportunities? Probably not. Because Columbus doesn’t offer much more outside of jobs and cost of living.

    #529492

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    That’s not my argument. My argument is that Columbus has relatively more JOBS due to many reasons that include “a recession-proof industry in state government, a research engine in Ohio State, a central location at the hub of the state’s other urban centers. And it’s fast becoming a regional center for financial and business services.”

    http://www.techcolumbus.org/economy-rebounds-columbus-leads-state-jobs-growth

    As a result you have people moving from neighboring cities that have fewer jobs which is helping us grow. So I’m not saying Columbus is strong because other people are moving here, I’m saying people are moving here because Columbus is strong.

    But that is the primary reason. People aren’t living in Cincinnati or Cleveland and saying “man I need to move to Columbus because its so cool”. They’re moving to find a job, any job.

    So essentially you’re arguing that Columbus has an inherently strong economy that attracts people from other cities. So Columbus is like every other city with a strong economy. Texas has strong economies, and all those cities attract people. This is a natural function of economics regardless of the conditions of neighboring cities.

    And you seem to never miss a chance to suggest that no one could ever find Columbus interesting beyond being forced to come there for employment.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 82 total)

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