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Columbus Economy - News & Updates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus Economy – News & Updates

  • This topic has 81 replies, 28 voices, and was last updated 5 years ago by News.
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 82 total)
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  • #529463

    What do the Governors of over 90% of the cities’s states on this list have In common??

    Answer: They’re all REPUBLICANS #FiscallyConservative

    #529464

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Walker said:
    I was waiting for you to bring the bad news to this thread. ;)

    I don’t see where that is really bad news. Cincinnati, Cleveland, Toledo, etc. are struggling economies. Columbus has a lot of things (Ohio State, healthcare) going for it. So people are leaving these struggling economies and coming here. That’s GOOD for Columbus. We need to be capitalizing on this growth to help build momentum for the future.

    Cleveland is struggling very bad but in terms of development prospects Cincinnati is pretty much equal with Columbus. Then when you add in the addition of the streetcar and a renewed focus on urban development I would count on them being down forever. We currently gain people from Cincinnati but If our only sell is that we have more jobs then what happens when their jobs come back?

    #529465

    InnerCore
    Participant

    geoyui said:

    I wasn’t the first person to point out where the rest of Ohio was on that list, Walker was.

    #529466

    geoyui
    Participant

    RealEstateAcademia said:
    What do the Governors of over 90% of the cities’s states on this list have In common??

    Answer: They’re all REPUBLICANS #FiscallyConservative

    By my estimation, 4 out of the top 5 cities have Democratic mayors.

    #529467

    geoyui
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    I wasn’t the first person to point out where the rest of Ohio was on that list, Walker was.

    Walker was referencing a comment about Kasich and why he may not get all the credit for Columbus’ success since the state is struggling. You are saying that Columbus, with it’s unwalkable neighborhoods, limited amenities and inability to do what other great cities are doing, is benefiting from a struggling state.

    #529468

    InnerCore
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    Walker was referencing a comment about Kasich and why he may not get all the credit for Columbus’ success since the state is struggling. You are saying that Columbus, with it’s unwalkable neighborhoods, limited amenities and inability to do what other great cities are doing, is benefiting from a struggling state.

    No that’s not what I’m saying. The walkable part was in reference to walmart. People seem to believe that Walmart builds these huge discount stores covered with a sea of parking that seem to suck the life out of the neighborhood and people should be proud that there is no such Walmart within Miles of downtown or campus. I was pointing out that its the nature of the suburbs and not Walmart. You could replace every suburban Walmart with a suburban Target and not much would change. But when Walmart is forced to go into urban areas they create much better space. It’s an urban vs. suburban argument more than it is a Walmart vs. other discount retailer.

    The person then went on to claim that somehow Columbus was benefiting form being a “cool city” (their words not mine) which I don’t really think is the case. People and business are not moving to Columbus because it’s a cool city, they are moving because it has the best job prospects and therefore most growth in a struggling region.

    Now you can take that and try and turn it into some rant against Columbus or recognize the point I was making. We should capitalize on the growth from these cities so that when their economies pick back up we’ll have another driving factor to be at the top of that list.

    #529469
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    geoyui said:
    By my estimation, 4 out of the top 5 cities have Democratic mayors.

    Took it a bit further out. 12 of the top 15 actually.

    #529470

    gramarye
    Participant

    Sight unseen, I’ll wager that at least 80 of the entire list have Democratic mayors, though. Remember, this is a list of U.S. cities with metro-area populations above 500,000. Most of those are going to have Democratic mayors, encircled by rings of suburbs where the mayors are far more likely to be Republican (though with some Democratic suburban mayors as well, just not a majority). That’s almost the standard-issue local political geography of American metro areas today.

    #529471
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    Don’t get me wrong Gram, I wouldn’t really consider anything about this list to be partisan…was simply a response to the poster on the last page pointing to the governors.

    I’m sure there’s lots of things, like universities, that those cities have in common as well that are more meaningful than the party of their mayor or governor.

    #529472

    melikecheese
    Participant

    So this link tells you the 18 things that go into creating the ranking:
    http://www.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/on-numbers/scott-thomas/2012/09/how-the-on-numbers-economic-index-is.html

    Instead of getting all crazy about Walmarts and conservatives and this and all that.

    I’m gonna go with we have the Mayor to thank for a lot of our positive news, and that’s great, who cares what political affiliation he has!

    #529473

    InnerCore
    Participant

    melikecheese said:
    So this link tells you the 18 things that go into creating the ranking:
    http://www.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/on-numbers/scott-thomas/2012/09/how-the-on-numbers-economic-index-is.html

    Instead of getting all crazy about Walmarts and conservatives and this and all that.

    I’m gonna go with we have the Mayor to thank for a lot of our positive news, and that’s great, who cares what political affiliation he has!

    I had actually looked through how the index was created which is why I new it had nothing to do with being a cool city or Walmart being miles from downtown. 80% of the scores come from employment and earnings and 20% from housing.

    Here is another recent article from the Columbus Business Journal:
    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2012/12/27/columbus-in-top-third-of-us-for-pace.html

    “An improving jobs picture is driving Columbus’ economic recovery, overcoming sluggishness in housing prices and overall economic output, according to a new report from the Brookings Institution.”

    Overall Columbus was ranked 32nd. But it was ranked 11th for unemployment and 75th for GDP. Arguing over a specific number is pointless. But I think its obvious that Columbus’strong point is jobs in a region that doesn’t have them.

    #529474

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    I really wish people here would stop ragging on Walmart. It really just accentuates how out of touch people are with what’s going on in the rest of America. If its not Walmart then it will be another discount retailer taking it’s place. It has to do more with the vibrancy of the neighborhood than whether or not there is a Walmart. As Walmart has recognized the need to move back to urban environments they have been putting out great designs. Its these unwalkable suburban neighborhoods you should have a problem with, not Walmart. And it does speak volumes that if you live downtown you have to drive MILES to Walmart… or Target or anything comparable for that matter. It sucks. You should be able to walk up the street to these amenities.

    Columbus is benefiting from the poor economies from the cities around it. We need to find a way to capitalize on this growth so that when/if these other cities recover people don’t simply move back home.

    Wal-Mart deserves every bit of the criticism it gets. I’m not sure there’s been a more widespread damaging corporation out there from so many different angles. I’d rank them just above Monsanto for just how bad they’ve been. That’s not going to change simply because they throw out a few urban store designs.

    And your premise that Columbus’ economy is only strong because everyone around them is failing may be the most ridiculous thing you’ve said yet.

    #529475

    columbusmike
    Participant

    melikecheese said:
    I’m gonna go with we have the Mayor to thank for a lot of our positive news, and that’s great, who cares what political affiliation he has!

    I agree. Whatever political views you have, Coleman is passionate about this city and has done a lot to give Columbus a positive view.

    #529476

    columbusmike
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    Wal-Mart deserves every bit of the criticism it gets. I’m not sure there’s been a more widespread damaging corporation out there from so many different angles. I’d rank them just above Monsanto for just how bad they’ve been. That’s not going to change simply because they throw out a few urban store designs.

    And your premise that Columbus’ economy is only strong because everyone around them is failing may be the most ridiculous thing you’ve said yet.

    I wouldn’t say WalMart is that much different than, say, Target, BestBuy, Kroger, or any other big box store. They just happened to be the first to proliferate the big box concept around America to the detriment of small business, communities, and real jobs.

    #529477

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    I don’t see where that is really bad news. Cincinnati, Cleveland, Toledo, etc. are struggling economies. Columbus has a lot of things (Ohio State, healthcare) going for it. So people are leaving these struggling economies and coming here. That’s GOOD for Columbus. We need to be capitalizing on this growth to help build momentum for the future.

    Cleveland is struggling very bad but in terms of development prospects Cincinnati is pretty much equal with Columbus. Then when you add in the addition of the streetcar and a renewed focus on urban development I would count on them being down forever. We currently gain people from Cincinnati but If our only sell is that we have more jobs then what happens when their jobs come back?

    Columbus has had a fairly strong economy for most of its existence, even before these other cities began to have issues. That’s not going to suddenly not be true anymore if Cleveland gets its act together.

    And 99% of the Sun Belt’s attraction has been economy, with the 1% weather. Strong economies attract people and always will, regardless of how the neighbors are doing.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 82 total)

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