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Columbus Charter Schools

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 132 total)
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  • #557716

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    When something is provided by the government, it is not “free.” When it comes to education, government-provided education is not only never “free,” it is also seldom “comprehensive.”

    The goal is to give children as comprehensive an education as possible. The government sucks at it and it is about time that other alternatives were at least allowed to try. So some fail. No one said educating kids was easy.

    How bad would the government suck at it if it could reject the bottom 30%-50% of students like private schools can?

    #557717

    gramarye
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    How bad would the government suck at it if it could reject the bottom 30%-50% of students like private schools can?

    Likely substantially less so. Which is a good reason for giving the government the power to do exactly that, rather than going through the sham dance of sending them to fortified daycare centers that aren’t “schools” in any meaningful sense of the word. That, however, is a separate discussion.

    #557718

    groundrules
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Well, from the point of view of their defenders on a systemic level, the fact that charter schools can fail is a feature, not a bug … and the fact that failing public schools are generally not allowed to actually fold is a bug, not a feature. The fact that 29% have failed means that the vast majority have not (though, of course, some of the other 71% might fail in the coming years, while more might open). The goal isn’t to have every single charter school succeed. It’s to have the good ones grow and the bad ones go.

    so someone cuts their teeth learning to run a business, kids get dumped. you might get a second chance at figuring out how to run a school, but recovering from a failed stint in grade school is a little more costly.

    #557719

    kit444
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Likely substantially less so. Which is a good reason for giving the government the power to do exactly that, rather than going through the sham dance of sending them to fortified daycare centers that aren’t “schools” in any meaningful sense of the word. That, however, is a separate discussion.

    What happens to all those kids rejected from school?

    #557720

    joev
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Likely substantially less so. Which is a good reason for giving the government the power to do exactly that, rather than going through the sham dance of sending them to fortified daycare centers that aren’t “schools” in any meaningful sense of the word. That, however, is a separate discussion.

    Quoting to commemorate/bemoan the last step of gramarye’s transition to a mindless libertarian.

    #557721

    myliftkk
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Well, from the point of view of their defenders on a systemic level, the fact that charter schools can fail is a feature, not a bug … and the fact that failing public schools are generally not allowed to actually fold is a bug, not a feature. The fact that 29% have failed means that the vast majority have not (though, of course, some of the other 71% might fail in the coming years, while more might open). The goal isn’t to have every single charter school succeed. It’s to have the good ones grow and the bad ones go.

    It’s a bug when you have sponsor’s who obviously are terrible at vetting potential schools.

    The point of the vetting is to prevent immediately failing charter’s from opening in the first place (which is what was being described in the article).

    They weren’t really clear on the true median age for charters, but I’m guessing it’s right around 4-5 years (since they would have undoubtedly said if it was much greater). So from a random selection standpoint, you’ve got a 50% chance whatever charter school you send your kid to is going to disappear before they fulfill their time there.

    #557722

    gramarye
    Participant

    groundrules said:
    so someone cuts their teeth learning to run a business, kids get dumped. you might get a second chance at figuring out a school, but recovering from a failed stint in grade school is a little more costly.

    Which is exactly what happens right now at many of the public schools that these children are escaping. I haven’t seen a viable proposal for fixing the current system, while keeping it completely publicly run, that doesn’t involve just throwing more money at the problem and praying. The fact is that many public schools would fail almost instantly if they were privatized, so the fact that their private competition occasionally fails is hardly cause for celebrating the “success” of public schools and crowing at the “failure” of charters.

    myliftkk said:
    It’s a bug when you have sponsor’s who obviously are terrible at vetting potential schools.

    The point of the vetting is to prevent immediately failing charter’s from opening in the first place (which is what was being described in the article).

    They weren’t really clear on the true median age for charters, but I’m guessing it’s right around 4-5 years (since they would have undoubtedly said if it was much greater). So from a random selection standpoint, you’ve got a 50% chance whatever charter school you send your kid to is going to disappear before they fulfill their time there.

    Anything is still better than the public system we have in some places. Not only do we have far too many failing public schools, but public schools that are successful are often successful primarily due to reasons that shouldn’t exactly be celebrated (i.e., economically exclusionary zoning that serves much the same function as private and charter schools’ ability to reject and/or expel students).

    kit444 said:
    What happens to all those kids rejected from school?

    What happens to all those who stay at Brookhaven, Briggs, Beechcroft, Marion-Franklin, East, West, etc.?

    #557723

    gramarye
    Participant

    joev said:
    Quoting to commemorate/bemoan the last step of gramarye’s transition to a mindless libertarian.

    Says the person who just upthread called charter schools a “cancer.” I’m thinking that your evaluation of rational thinking on this subject is somewhat open to question.

    #557724
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Likely substantially less so. Which is a good reason for giving the government the power to do exactly that, rather than going through the sham dance of sending them to fortified daycare centers that aren’t “schools” in any meaningful sense of the word. That, however, is a separate discussion.

    I’ve heard some anti-charter schools types say charters can throw out whomever they like, but the other side says charters are, in effect, a different kind of public school and can not expel students without cause.

    Without caring too much, exactly how easy is it for a charter school to give a student the boot?

    #557725

    kit444
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    What happens to all those who stay at Brookhaven, Briggs, Beechcroft, Marion-Franklin, East, West, etc.?

    I wasn’t asking a rhetorical question. Seriously, what happens to all those kids who aren’t in school between the age of 5 and working age?

    #557726
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Says the person who just upthread called charter schools a “cancer.” I’m thinking that your evaluation of rational thinking on this subject is somewhat open to question.

    FTFY

    #557727

    Graybeak
    Participant

    kit444 said:
    I wasn’t asking a rhetorical question. Seriously, what happens to all those kids who aren’t in school between the age of 5 and working age?

    When I was growing up, 5 was working age…

    #557728

    myliftkk
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    Anything is still better than the public system we have in some places.

    It’s exactly that opinion that encourages naifs to the grifters to open a “school”.

    There’s a lot of ways children can be “educated” that are worse. Child soldiering comes to mind.

    #557729
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    I don’t like children or hockey so I don’t feel I should have to pay for either.

    #557730
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    Child soldiering comes to mind.

    I’d pay extra to send some people’s kids to Kony.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 132 total)

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