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Columbus: Get ready for the Tall North

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Columbus: Get ready for the Tall North

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • #1100449
    _calebross
    _calebross
    Participant

    Tall North? Lolololololol actually kind of like the ring to it.

    #1100456
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    I too like any number of things about the HUB project, especially the High Street part. But, they should have made them put one more level of the garage below ground and the garage should have maintained the common setback along Hubbard Avenue. That would have made it fit in better with the surrounding older residential housing.

    I like the fact that they lined Hubbard with townhouses. I think it’s better that way than if they had just left them off and kept the normal setback. But I do think they should have kept a strip of grass between the curb and the sidewalk in front of those townhouses. That or they should have planted bigger trees. It still feels too sterile along Hubbard.

    #1100457

    rory
    Participant

    This trend is going to ruin the historic charm of the neighborhood. I agree that tall buildings should go downtown. I think though that a bigger, and different danger, is that the density is driven by parking rather than mass transit. Combine that with the High Street streetscape plan to reduce the number of lanes on High Street to one travel lane in each direction and a center turn lane and you might get a hot traffic mess not to mention there’s no room for any other mode of transportation. Granted, I can clog up the lane with my bicycle and there’s the bus, maybe a streetcar in the center lane? But making the area so auto-centric has got to bite the city in the ass at some point.

    #1101311

    cadillackid
    Participant

    has any one of the “Tall-haters” actually noticed in what some call “real-cities”.. I hate that term but its used a lot.. that most all the time you look UP to find the sky.. most every city i travel that is really vibing and growing is going Up… not just downtown either.. but even in the burbs it is becoming more and more common for buildings to reach and exceed that 8-10 floor mark… real estate is expensive.. regardless of where you go… along with the fact people want to live-work-play close by their home. the only way to do that is build up not out… there are PLENTY of places to go if you want to look sideways and find the sky… alas the OTHER very popular thing to do which is people moving BEYOND the suburbs and out to areas where they have an acre or 2 or 3.. and nearby a cluster of businesses for those people to patronize.. kind of a wide-area suburb so to say.. but really.. boston, pittsburgh, austin, houston (even the galleria suburb), atlanta, (even the suburb buckhead), to name a few are all building UP…

    -Christopher

    #1101314
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    when are we going to admit that this tall building fetish, is really some sort of Freudian transference. The waves of rich suburbanites discovering the city, recreates the self same power and class distinctions they so lovingly created for themselves when the fled to the burbs the first time…..distance from reality and its effects. The high rise condo is the new gated community, deal with it and your small dick insecurities.

    #1101371

    Nancy H
    Participant

    Totally agree with lazyfish. The “tall lovers” cadilackid mentioned don’t need to look up to see the sky. They just need to look up from texting the person walking beside them to notice they are in a “real city” neighborhood already.

    #1101387

    Roger846
    Participant

    when are we going to admit that this tall building fetish, is really some sort of Freudian transference…The high rise condo is the new gated community, deal with it and your small dick insecurities.

    I don’t see why there’s a need for insults like this. Many people associate tall buildings with big, exciting cities that people want to move to and where things are happening. Not everything is a sign of neuroses and insecurities. Different people like different sorts of things.

    For me, I admit that you can’t put a tall building in the middle of a bunch of houses, but having some along High Street seems fine to me. I kind of like a mixture of tall, short and medium height buildings along with shorter buildings that open up to the neighborhoods behind them.

    #1101397
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I don’t see why there’s a need for insults like this.

    +1

    There’s room for all kinds of opinions about all kinds of topics.

    No need for anyone to sling personal insult of any kind at each other.

    #1101403

    dubdave00
    Participant

    The high rise condo is the new gated community, deal with it and your small dick insecurities.

    That’s not really “new”. Rich people have enjoyed high rises for many a decade. And I think the continued suburban sprawl would suggest that new gated communities are the new gated communities.

    #1101427

    Nancy H
    Participant

    In rereading Roger846’s comment, it made me realize many of the tall building lovers only visit High Street in the Short North. Roger, I am not talking about you specifically, it is just that you worded it so well.

    For me, I admit that you can’t put a tall building in the middle of a bunch of houses, but having some along High Street seems fine to me. I kind of like a mixture of tall, short and medium height buildings along with shorter buildings that open up to the neighborhoods behind them.

    The commercial buildings on High Street occupy the space between Wall Alley and Pearl Alley. That is roughly 400 feet. Slightly more narrow in a few areas and as much as 450 on the north end around Seventh and High.

    An average city block in Midwestern cities is 330 feet. The High Street commercial area is basically a one block stretch running between 2 to 2-1/2 story houses. There is no buffer area of shorter buildings that open up to the neighborhoods behind the High Street buildings. The tall buildings sit right next to the shorter houses.

    Many developers ARE attempting to put tall buildings in the middle of a bunch of houses. That is why the IVC and VVC struggles with and obsesses over every tall building proposal. And a good reason why most of them end up shorter than originally proposed.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)

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