Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Columbus City Schools - News, Updates, and Discussion

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Columbus City Schools – News, Updates, and Discussion

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 617 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #326578

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    berdawn wrote >>

    Coley wrote >>
    I am an alumni of Fort Hayes (after 10 yrs of Catholic school) and my step-daughter goes to CAHS. If you have to choose a CCS to go to, it would be one of these.

    Neither of those are schools that parents can choose, though…they’re lottery-based.

    True but Centennial is a neighborhood school that is consistently excellent. Also Whetstone has really improved lately; maybe not quite to the top rung but it’s no Dangerous Minds.

    #326579

    gramarye
    Participant

    Analogue Kid wrote >>

    berdawn wrote >>

    Coley wrote >>
    I am an alumni of Fort Hayes (after 10 yrs of Catholic school) and my step-daughter goes to CAHS. If you have to choose a CCS to go to, it would be one of these.

    Neither of those are schools that parents can choose, though…they’re lottery-based.

    True but Centennial is a neighborhood school that is consistently excellent. Also Whetstone has really improved lately; maybe not quite to the top rung but it’s no Dangerous Minds.

    It sounds like you give the GS ratings more credence than you think, or at least more than USNWR. Centennial and Whetstone are two of the three highest ranked non-lottery CPS schools (Independence being #2). That comports with my understanding of the schools as well. I have given due credit to Centennial in particular on these boards in the past, and some of the brightest people I know went to CAHS, but of course, CAHS is a lottery school.

    I don’t think GS is overly biased by “suburban special interest” money; if it were, all of the Dublin schools would be rated at 10s, whereas only one is. Pickerington Central would rank lower, but not as low as a 6. Grandview Heights would probably not get a 10–there’s some money there (particularly as you get closer to the UA border), but not scads.

    As to why many parents spend so much to get houses in good districts, or for private school: I know that the wealth of the family also plays a role in helping a child both get into and afford college; however, the peer group and the school (particularly the teachers) are also highly influential. What drives families into these top-tier districts isn’t necessarily buying better textbooks or classroom technology or anything of that nature, but buying a different peer group. Anecdotally, they have reason. My high school was a midsize exurban public school getting a 7 on the GS scale. We had a smattering of AP course (3) and a small cohort of high achievers, but most of the school was not exactly a very compatible peer group for me. I was the only National Merit Finalist in my class, and the classes before and after me may not have had any. Upper Arlington produces several every year.

    Schools like Upper Arlington, Dublin, and Olentangy also tend to have the pick of any graduating M.Ed. class they want–the competition to get jobs is fierce. They can also entice accomplished teachers who have distinguished themselves at “lesser” schools into their ranks; my high school frequently lost some of its most promising young talent to suburban-ring schools. Someone I know very well, by contrast, is a student teacher right now at Independence, and the stories said person tells about the full-time teachers at Independence make me cry (and not in a good way). Several have almost terminal apathy.

    Bottom line: I stand by my original post. I wouldn’t give that list to a friend or relative moving into or within the area. I wouldn’t give it to them as a list of schools to *avoid,* either, but I just don’t see much reason to give it much credit as a “list of good schools in the area” or whatever it’s being advanced as. Centennial made the list and is a good school; South made the list and is South.

    #326580

    elenamary
    Member

    Don’t Columbus Public High Schools only have about a 40.9% graduation rate? (USA Today Graduation Rates)
    Seems like that would make a school rank kind of low, no?

    #326581
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    CCS To Vote On Building Closings Tonight
    By DONNA WILLIS
    December 15, 2009

    A big decision was expected from the Columbus City Schools board of education Tuesday night.

    The board was expected to vote on its external oversight committee’s recommendations to close nine schools next year.

    READ MORE: http://www2.nbc4i.com/cmh/news/local/education/article/ccs_to_vote_on_building_closings_tonight/28385/

    #326582

    misskitty
    Participant

    elenamary wrote >>
    Don’t Columbus Public High Schools only have about a 40.9% graduation rate? (USA Today Graduation Rates)
    Seems like that would make a school rank kind of low, no?

    I am pretty sure it’s about 70%
    http://centralohioindicators.org/site/indicators/PDFs/Education%204.pdf

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23889321/

    http://www.ode.state.oh.us/reportcardfiles/2008-2009/DIST/043802.pdf

    #326583

    catnfiddle
    Participant

    Do those graduation rates factor in students who move from one school to another or who transfer in or out of charter / private schools? There are a lot of wacky factors when crunching the data.

    #326584

    gramarye
    Participant

    Breaking news: Board voted to shutter all nine schools under consideration. (Enrollment is down from 65,000 in 2000-01 to 53,000 now, apparently.)

    #326585

    alison
    Member

    Graduation rates are among the weirdest numbers in education. Everyone seems to calculate them differently, depending on what they’re trying to prove.

    #326586

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    gramarye wrote >>

    It sounds like you give the GS ratings more credence than you think, or at least more than USNWR. Centennial and Whetstone are two of the three highest ranked non-lottery CPS schools (Independence being #2). That comports with my understanding of the schools as well. I have given due credit to Centennial in particular on these boards in the past, and some of the brightest people I know went to CAHS, but of course, CAHS is a lottery school.
    I don’t think GS is overly biased by “suburban special interest” money; if it were, all of the Dublin schools would be rated at 10s, whereas only one is. Pickerington Central would rank lower, but not as low as a 6. Grandview Heights would probably not get a 10–there’s some money there (particularly as you get closer to the UA border), but not scads.
    As to why many parents spend so much to get houses in good districts, or for private school: I know that the wealth of the family also plays a role in helping a child both get into and afford college; however, the peer group and the school (particularly the teachers) are also highly influential. What drives families into these top-tier districts isn’t necessarily buying better textbooks or classroom technology or anything of that nature, but buying a different peer group. Anecdotally, they have reason. My high school was a midsize exurban public school getting a 7 on the GS scale. We had a smattering of AP course (3) and a small cohort of high achievers, but most of the school was not exactly a very compatible peer group for me. I was the only National Merit Finalist in my class, and the classes before and after me may not have had any. Upper Arlington produces several every year.
    Schools like Upper Arlington, Dublin, and Olentangy also tend to have the pick of any graduating M.Ed. class they want–the competition to get jobs is fierce. They can also entice accomplished teachers who have distinguished themselves at “lesser” schools into their ranks; my high school frequently lost some of its most promising young talent to suburban-ring schools. Someone I know very well, by contrast, is a student teacher right now at Independence, and the stories said person tells about the full-time teachers at Independence make me cry (and not in a good way). Several have almost terminal apathy.
    Bottom line: I stand by my original post. I wouldn’t give that list to a friend or relative moving into or within the area. I wouldn’t give it to them as a list of schools to *avoid,* either, but I just don’t see much reason to give it much credit as a “list of good schools in the area” or whatever it’s being advanced as. Centennial made the list and is a good school; South made the list and is South.

    I know what you’re saying, I think we just have very different perspectives on what worked for us. I was happy to go to a school where I could learn what’s necessary to succeed in the world but not feel like I had to spend every waking hour studying and actually could “enjoy” my teenage years. It sounds like you found this kind of environment constraining and thought you weren’t able to achieve what you wanted, which is unfortunate to be sure.

    By contrast, my Fiancee went to a very highly rated suburban-ring school and absolutely despised it. She’s very bright and wanted to distinguish herself but had very little opportunity to do so because there were so many true geniuses there. Because she was very driven, she was basically forced to have 0 social life just so she could keep up with all the work and yet didn’t end up with an especially high class rank (top 25% I believe).

    #326587
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Columbus families shop for schools
    600 parents attend information fair on district’s lottery system
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010
    BY JENNIFER SMITH RICHARDS
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    In a school version of speed dating, about 600 parents came to find their child’s perfect match.

    The Columbus district conducts information fairs each year for parents who are interested in the lottery process, but this year was different. Turnout was twice what it has been in past years, said Carolyn Roman, who oversees school choice for the district. The elementary- and middle-school fairs were held together, which isn’t typical.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/02/24/families-shop-for-schools.html?sid=101

    #326588
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Citywide learning program is ready
    Thursday, February 25, 2010 2:55 AM
    BY JENNIFER SMITH RICHARDS
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    A citywide initiative that pulls nonprofit agencies, businesses, foundations and the Columbus school district together to screen young children for school readiness has begun. Officials will announce the start of Columbus Kids: Ready, Set, Learn at an event today.

    http://www.columbuskids.org

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/02/25/citywide-learning-program-is-ready.html?sid=101

    #326589
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Charter school might close after state halts funding
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010
    BY JENNIFER SMITH RICHARDS
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    No more state money is coming to a Columbus charter school, which means it likely will close.

    Chase Academy for Communication Arts reported an enrollment of as many as 189 students this school year. But in January, the South Side school told the state that its monthly counts had been off and that only 108 students actually attend.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/02/24/charter-may-close-after-state-halts-funding.html?sid=101

    #326590

    BCNation
    Participant

    lazyfish wrote >>
    something is fishy with these results, South, Marion Franklin and Walnut Ridge are terrible, jacked up schools. Interestingly West did not make the list and compared to the three above, it is a pretty good school. Beechcroft also failed to make the list and it is also far superior to many of those that did.
    Seems the only CPS high schools that did not make the list are Africentric, Brookhaven, Mifflin, Beechcroft, West….
    maybe these are more subjective than objective.

    …and East.

    When I saw South, I thought it was a typo, and thought that they meant Westerville South.

    #326591
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Switching schools will be a plus for many Columbus students
    Monday, March 1, 2010
    BY JENNIFER SMITH RICHARDS
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    Many Columbus students will be assigned to better-performing schools as the district shuffles attendance zones this fall.

    That’s mostly because nine long-struggling schools are closing in June, although many students from the closed schools will be sent to ones that also are academically weak.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/03/01/switching-schools-is-a-plus-for-many.html?sid=101

    #326592
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Is schools pact still a Win-Win?
    Most suburban districts likely to renew land-sharing deal
    Sunday, March 21, 2010
    By Charlie Boss
    THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

    A 24-year-old pact that allows areas of Columbus to remain in nine suburban Franklin County school districts is up for renewal in May.

    Most districts appear ready to continue the Win-Win agreement, which essentially ensures that school-district boundaries will not change when the city of Columbus annexes land, said Bart Anderson, superintendent of the Educational Service Center of Central Ohio.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatchpolitics.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/03/21/copy/is-schools-pact-still-a-win-win.html?adsec=politics&sid=101

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 617 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

URBAN LIVING TOUR 2020

This year’s Urban Living Tour event has been postponed due to COVID-19, but will be returning later this summer!

CLICK HERE to sign up to be notified when tickets go on sale!