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Food Truck Regulations in Columbus

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Food Truck Regulations in Columbus

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 71 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #527708

    bucki12
    Member

    It is almost like it is setup to fail. ‘First come, first serve’ is a recipe for problems.

    #527709

    News
    Participant

    #527710

    DouginCMH
    Participant

    For anyone interested who didn’t see this in last weekend’s NY Times, here’s an article on the crappy regulatory environment for food trucks in NYC:

    #527711

    News
    Participant

    Food Truck Pilot Program To Launch, Despite Simmering Controversy
    Thursday May 16, 2013 9:37 PM

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – By Saturday, Columbus food truck operators will need to get licenses if they want to join a pilot program that would let them park on Columbus streets. The program starts in two weeks, but controversy still simmers.

    READ MORE: http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2013/05/16/columbus-food-truck-pilot-program.html

    #527712

    billbix
    Member

    ‘First come, first served’ seems moronic for the issues mentioned. Hopefully this will be worked out instead of just stalling the expansion of food trucks in Columbus.

    #527713
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Part of me can understand the frustration of a first-come-first-served system. But part of me also wants to say that if a food truck wants a guaranteed spot they should just open a restaurant instead. ;)

    #527714

    goldenidea
    Participant

    But part of me also wants to say that if a food truck wants a guaranteed spot they should just open a restaurant instead. ;)

    +1

    Recognizing that hard working food truck operators are beneficial and deserving, one argument is guaranteeing them spaces give food trucks (perhaps an unfair?) leg up on brick & mortar restaurants which have to make much larger investments and long term commitments to position themselves in favorable locations like downtown and Short North. Perhaps city council realizes this is thus reluctant to grant guaranteed spaces. Anything more than random access gives a food truck a physical position at much lower cost than competing brick and mortar restaurants. Perhaps council’s intent is to offset the benefit of mobility and lower set-up cost by only providing random access.

    The above factors are just part of a complicated situation. It’s difficult to create a balanced and equitable set of rules fair to all interested parties. There are other sides and elements to this issue. For example, from the consumer standpoint it’s certainly nice to have food trucks. Truck operators need to know they can efficiently access customers.

    #527715

    billbix
    Member

    I think they just need to have a lottery for rotating trucks in those spaces. Since no truck would repeat in the same spot until other candidates had also had a turn in that spot there would not be a huge advantage over a B&M.

    As has been talked about there are plenty of advantages that Brick and Mortar restaurants have over food trucks. In the end the food trucks are pushing the food scene to a higher level. I imagine that some food truck operators would want to eventually open a B&M.

    just my 2 cents

    #527716

    myliftkk
    Participant

    billbix said:
    I think they just need to have a lottery for rotating trucks in those spaces. Since no truck would repeat in the same spot until other candidates had also had a turn in that spot there would not be a huge advantage over a B&M.

    This.

    IIRC, they already have/had a working lottery system for cart vendors downtown. I don’t see why it’s so difficult to simply extend that program.

    From attendees at the meeting, it was apparent city staff that drew up the locations didn’t even know where the locations were since they thought one was on West Warren, which doesn’t exist.

    #527717

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    billbix said:
    As has been talked about there are plenty of advantages that Brick and Mortar restaurants have over food trucks.

    I like the food trucks myself, but what advantages do the Brick & Mortar restaurants have over the food trucks that didn’t require long term commitment and huge investment in their fixed locations?

    If you mean stuff like comfortable seating, air conditioning and heat, bathrooms etc. isn’t that part of the huge investment the restauranteurs commit to?

    Like I said, I enjoy an occasional lunch off one of the trucks, however I can see where the fixed store restauranteurs might feel a bit disadvantaged if a food truck was given a permanent spot nearby.

    My opinion is that if someone chooses to operate a mobile food service vs a fixed store restaurant then they should accept the fact that they don’t have a fixed location.

    #527718

    myliftkk
    Participant

    JeepGirl said:
    I like the food trucks myself, but what advantages do the Brick & Mortar restaurants have over the food trucks that didn’t require long term commitment and huge investment in their fixed locations?

    It’s called a bar.

    #527719

    billbix
    Member

    If they use a rotating incremental lottery, no truck is getting a permanent fixed location.

    I eat at both food trucks and b&m’s. I eat far more meals at brick and mortar restaurants than food trucks and I also have a mental limit of what I would be willing to pay at a food truck and that is a lower figure than a b&m.

    In my mind the huge investment made by the b&m’s pays off in the opportunity of 365 days of comfortable dining in a set location. Personally, if their food and service is up to snuff that tends to work out overwhelmingly in their favor.

    Where the issue rises to the front is at those places that serve mediocre products and service. Those are the businesses that will be most effected.

    #527720

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    It’s called a bar.

    That too. No matter what part of a fixed restaurant you appreciate the most, the amenities of a brick & mortar require an investment of money, time, and effort well beyond a simple kitchen and stainless counter top on wheels.

    #527721

    turnedNOTburned
    Participant

    goldenidea said:

    But part of me also wants to say that if a food truck wants a guaranteed spot they should just open a restaurant instead. ;)

    +2 2 Great posts, <count laugh> Ha, ha, haaaa

    Recognizing that hard working food truck operators are beneficial and deserving, one argument is guaranteeing them spaces give food trucks (perhaps an unfair?) leg up on brick & mortar restaurants which have to make much larger investments and long term commitments to position themselves in favorable locations like downtown and Short North. Perhaps city council realizes this is thus reluctant to grant guaranteed spaces. Anything more than random access gives a food truck a physical position at much lower cost than competing brick and mortar restaurants. Perhaps council’s intent is to offset the benefit of mobility and lower set-up cost by only providing random access.

    The above factors are just part of a complicated situation. It’s difficult to create a balanced and equitable set of rules fair to all interested parties. There are other sides and elements to this issue. For example, from the consumer standpoint it’s certainly nice to have food trucks. Truck operators need to know they can efficiently access customers.

    #527722
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I love food trucks, and I love the people who run food trucks. But ultimately, if you want a nice vibrant Downtown, we need to incentivize more full-time brick and mortar businesses to operate at longer hours, all week long.

    Being too accommodating of food trucks just gives those businesses incentive to set up during peak hours and then leave the neighborhood once that’s over. It impacts brick and mortar businesses negatively, making it harder for them to justify their more permanent investments.

    I think there’s some sort of happy medium to be found in between.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 71 total)

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