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Columbus City Council Elections 2015

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Columbus City Council Elections 2015

Viewing 14 posts - 166 through 179 (of 179 total)
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  • #1099997

    wollam11
    Participant

    New here. And really new to the presence of anything local on the internet. As I’m filling out my ballot, I have no idea who stands for what. I know the current council members, for example, are (all?) corrupt parts of the Andy Ginther political machine. So who do I vote for? Loathe to vote for anyone who is still a member of the Republican Party after what we’ve seen transpire in Washington the last 7 years.

    So, is there any progressive organization locally who have published a list of endorsed candidates?

    #1100027

    New here. And really new to the presence of anything local on the internet. As I’m filling out my ballot, I have no idea who stands for what. I know the current council members, for example, are (all?) corrupt parts of the Andy Ginther political machine. So who do I vote for? Loathe to vote for anyone who is still a member of the Republican Party after what we’ve seen transpire in Washington the last 7 years.

    So, is there any progressive organization locally who have published a list of endorsed candidates?

    Your vote is between established, already-shown-to-be corrupt politicians and new, might-end-up-being corrupt politicians. I don’t know of any single progressive organization with the right answers. In Columbus using the appoint first/run as incumbent with lots of money from Council president method, all new Council members since 1997 have been first appointed by the Democrats before they face any voters. The Democrats have been the only game in town, so much so that the party has divided into two local factions and is fighting with itself for power. So there’s Ginther-D vs. Scott-D in the mayor’s race.

    My hope is that tomorrow’s election leads to government comprised of some Democrats and some Republicans so that there can be some checks and balances in City Hall. The Coleman-Ginther wing of the Democrats has become drunk with power, arrogant and greedily corrupt. I say let’s give some others a chance. Most or all Republicans running are quite moderate anyway, as fits the city’s political personality.

    #1100052

    News
    Participant

    Columbus City Council 2015 Voter Roundup
    November 2, 2015 4:15 pm – Walker Evans

    Columbus City Council has a total of seven seats, and five of them are up for grabs during this fall’s election, marking one of the largest council races in recent decades. The the voting process is nonpartisan — you’ll pick four of eight candidates to fill four of the seats with a fifth seating being a head-to-head race — but the field of candidates to select from are largely split down traditional party lines.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/columbus-city-council-2015-voter-roundup

    #1100332

    The big loser in yesterday’s election is Michelle Mills, who resigned her Council seat and removed her name from the ballot after the John Raphael-organized Centerplate junket to the Indianapolis post-season Buckeyes’ game hit the news.

    The fact that Andrew Ginther, Shannon Hardin, and Eileen Paley were elected mayor, reelected to Council, and elected municipal court judge, respectively, despite having also attended the trip now being investigated by the Ohio Ethics Commission shows that a majority of local voters don’t care if politicians accept benefits at drastically-reduced prices by vendors “wishing to show [them] their appreciation”.

    Mills probably would have easily won reelection despite having accepted an estimated $500 benefit in Columbus’ pay-to-play system that, based on yesterday’s results, is likely to continue or worsen. When we vote for the best government money can buy, that’s what we get. If only Ms. Mills had known that her behavior was OK with us, who knows what fun trips she could have taken during the next four years? Who knew that “public service” could be so much fun for the “public servant”?!!!

    #1100338
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    … shows that a majority of local voters don’t care if politicians accept benefits at drastically-reduced prices by vendors “wishing to show [them] their appreciation”…

    I do believe there is a limit to what voters will tolerate. I think this does show a cynicism that voters are willing accept minor ethics infractions by existing politicians when there are no conclusively superior alternative candidates on the ballot. The problem is with the two-party system that limits choice on the ballot.

    #1100348

    joev
    Participant

    The council and mayoral elections are non-partisan. The top candidates (of any party) from the primary were on the ballot. You can blame the two-party system for a lot of things, but I don’t think our local elections belong on that list.

    #1100357

    The council and mayoral elections are non-partisan. The top candidates (of any party) from the primary were on the ballot. You can blame the two-party system for a lot of things, but I don’t think our local elections belong on that list.

    The problem here is the one-party system.

    If the Republicans had known before the May primary that news of the scandals would break before the November general election, they would have put a lot more thought, time and money into fielding a viable, likely very moderate, candidate to oppose Ginther and better, more recognizable and established candidates for Council. But, given that the Democratic machine has appointed EVERY new member of Council in the past 18 years, they felt it not worth the effort. A logical conclusion.

    #1100371

    News
    Participant

    Democratic Slate Sweeps Columbus City Council Race
    November 4, 2015 12:34 am – Walker Evans

    Klein. Brown. Stinziano. Hardin. Page. The Democratic slate of City Council Candidates restated their last names many times over during campaign events this year, and the tactic seems to have worked. Columbus voters took to the ballots today to elect all five of the Democratic candidates into office.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/columbus-city-council-election-results

    #1100376

    NDaEast
    Participant

    Congratulations to Elizabeth Brown for gaining a seat the old fashioned way — by election – and very impressively at the successful conclusion of a pregnancy and while moving. Hats off to her for forgoing the appointment process — of course, that is probably much easier when your dad is a U.S. Senator and you can raise $200,000 in ten weeks (according to today’s Dispatch).

    But what about the rest of the ordinary people in Columbus who may not have those advantages? Seattle voters just approved an Honest Elections campaign finance reform proposal (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/honest-elections-seattle_560d4018e4b0af3706dfaf02) that gives each voter $100 in public campaign contribution vouchers to give to the candidate(s) of his/her choice. This way, the candidates must come to the voters for support, rather than simply hitting a few large donors and carpet bombing the people with 30-second ads. What a novel approach to reforming elections! I would love to see our local elected officials do something along those lines … citizens have prepared a proposal to match small donors with public funds at a 5:1 ratio, to similarly encourage candidates to address the needs and seek the support of ordinary people. The fact that citizens have thrice proposed publicly financed campaigns, coming on the heels of Columbus’s most expensive election ever, creates space for change. Campaign finance reform was proposed by local elected officials in 1993 (I believe) after Cindy Lazarus spent $250,000 on her council campaign — is there a councilmember who sees a similar need today? — or have we become content with wildly unbalanced elections?

    It is past time to address the problem of money in politics and build public trust in our government.

    #1100379
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Congratulations to Elizabeth Brown for gaining a seat the old fashioned way — by election…

    FWIW, Stinziano did the same.

    #1100417
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    The council and mayoral elections are non-partisan. The top candidates (of any party) from the primary were on the ballot. You can blame the two-party system for a lot of things, but I don’t think our local elections belong on that list.

    The two parties still control the process and funds. when was the last time an independent won city council or placed in the primary?

    #1100442

    NDaEast
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>joev wrote:</div>
    The council and mayoral elections are non-partisan. The top candidates (of any party) from the primary were on the ballot. You can blame the two-party system for a lot of things, but I don’t think our local elections belong on that list.

    The two parties still control the process and funds. when was the last time an independent won city council or placed in the primary?

    I was invited to be an international election observer on the Gubernatorial elections in Bucamaranga, Columbia last week, and got to see multi-party elections. It was exciting and incredibly interesting … there is a true breadth of thought and philosophy in those multiparty elections and a lot of energy associated with each of the campaigns. Of course the downside of more than two parties is that people can win with less than half the country’s voted support, but it made me think more about our own elections — about how the two party system really constricts political expression and how much better I think a system that is not a zero sum game could be (parlimentary democracy, perhaps???).

    Process-wise, when voting ended at 4:00, we watched the tabulation of paper ballots that were poured out of the cardboard voting boxes onto tables in each “precinct” and counted right there with tallies announced publicly, in front of international and party observers. If there were more ballots than voters who signed in, they put all the ballots back in the box, shook the box up, and got a volunteer to reach in blindly and pull out the number of excess ballots. Then they put them on the floor and burned the arbitrarily retrieved excess ballots.

    As rudimentary of a system as that is, I thought “there is no way possible to coordinate enough people all across the country to swing an election through ballot box stuffing or tampering with ballots after voting” — unlike our electronic elections where we vote in a truly secret electronic box and would have no idea if our votes were hacked, changed or stolen.

    It was a great lifetime experience, and made me want to go back and study up on other political systems and think even more critically about our own. We can, and should, demand so much better than what we have– our two party American democracy/oligarchy (according to a new Princeton study) is collapsing.

    #1100461
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    …unlike our electronic elections where we vote in a truly secret electronic box and would have no idea if our votes were hacked, changed or stolen.

    Sounds like we should go back to that rudimentary system then, and we’d only have to worry about our votes being burned on the floor rather than hacked. ;)

    #1100503

    NDaEast
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>NDaEast wrote:</div>
    …unlike our electronic elections where we vote in a truly secret electronic box and would have no idea if our votes were hacked, changed or stolen.

    Sounds like we should go back to that rudimentary system then, and we’d only have to worry about our votes being burned on the floor rather than hacked. ;)

    As I watched the count process, I felt that at least I would know that it was arbitrarily burned — and everyone else’s vote had an equal chance of going up in smoke — rather than potentially purposefully altered for partisan gain. The decentralization of the count, each “precinct” count under observation by partisan and independent observers, makes wholesale vote manipulation nearly impossible, while it can be done in America with the swipe of a mouse.

    Bob Fitrakis, of The Columbus Free Press has written extensively about “push and pray” voting in Ohio: http://columbusfreepress.com/article/bob-bites-back-push-and-pray-voting

    http://columbusfreepress.com/article/diebold-indicted-its-spectre-still-haunts-ohio-elections

Viewing 14 posts - 166 through 179 (of 179 total)

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