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Columbus-Chicago Passenger Rail

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Columbus-Chicago Passenger Rail

  • This topic has 247 replies, 65 voices, and was last updated 5 years ago by SteveSteve.
Viewing 8 posts - 241 through 248 (of 248 total)
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  • #1048174

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    It is not only about distorted and disconnected metrics that often detractors of fast rail systems come up with, it is more often than not about their bizarre rationales. The large benefits of a fast rail system suitable for a modern and dynamics society are the intangible ones: freedom of choice and degree of freedom of the populous, and alongside these freedoms come amazing benefits to society and civilization as a whole (should one spend 20 hours per week driving with tension and stress while staring at the grass, or should one spend that time in a comfortable train cabin writing the next big best seller, or maybe help to write an amazing piece of code that will leverage the well-being of humanity). Low and behold, time is the most valuable asset that one have.

    As far as cheap air travel goes, it seems that across the board the prices are extremely expensive statistically speaking compared to just about any other country. Personally I could never find any airfare even with 3 months antecipation or more in my regional travel that would a price anywhere close to being acceptable. Moreover, the vast majority of people often have to drive 50 miles to the next airport whereon the airfares is still very high but not as exorbitant as the airport nearby for a trip of 200 miles (one sometimes would prefer to drive the 200 miles by car, instead of flying at all)

    Often, detractors highlight the cost of maintenance of a new rail system… How about the cost of the maintenance of roads and thousands vehicles – each one weighting few tons –- that would then stay inside a garage instead of creating more wear and tear on the roads. How about the cost of maintenance for individual and families with their automobiles which then would drop substantially (often mechanics charge over $100 per hour, or more depending on the complexity of the job), on top of that there is also wear and tear of the vehicle itself with then more frequent maintenance work (oil, fluids, tires, etc); and last but not least a huge depreciation in the value of the vehicles (coupled with lower resale value). Not to mention the billions of dollars sent to Arab countries for an ever growing supply of fuel, that monumental volume of money expended to import fuel from this region of the world creates fortunes over there which often foment and finance extremist groups masterminding new plots against America and America’s Interest abroad (guess has just seized large portions of Iraq). Large part of this money would then stay right here at home creating wealthy and prosperity. Concomitantly, as a direct result in the drop in consumption and thus demand for petrol and its derivative there would be less pressure on the price of fuel and thus lower gas prices at the pump (so even the detractors of the fast rail system would benefit; henceforth, both systems are not mutually exclusive but clearly they are complementary and accessory to each others existence)

    Some republic governors whose administration refused to take the federal money in order to build a modern fast rail mode of transportation argued that they would not get the money given that their roadways was still in a state of disrepair… Well, guess what: such things are unrelated. If one would take federal money to plant flowers on the edging the roadway shoulders — thus beautifying the roadways — then they would be related. They are as unrelated in the similar way that building new runways for airports would be unrelated; and neither are they mutually exclusive in any way, shape, or form. It is really absurd that politician occupying important position in the high sphere and echelon within the mantra of the public administration are capable of such bizarre and grotesque articulation.

    The incumbent governor Kasich refused the federal funds for the project arguing future financial woes. Whenever one incurs in infrastructure projects that benefit millions of people there need to be a certain volume of investments purported by the government. Given that the initial volume of investment is large, the return over the investment is long, and the risk is high; this of project that can only be undertaken by the public entity in the form of the public government whose primary goal is to further the public interest and benefit of the public for now and for the foreseeable future. Besides, it has been the case in the whole civilized and developed world possess much larger and faster rail systems than the one currently proposed to Ohio, maybe Ohio does not belong to the civilized and developed world ( Japan, Germany, etc, possess for a long time a much larger, faster, sophisticated and way more expansive fast rail system than the one currently proposed to Ohio) and thus can not afford to have such facilities available to its population.

    Did you know that the average American pay more in taxes than the average Japanese. So, how come they can have amazing marvels of technology such as the bullet train to further its modern and dynamic society and augment their quality of life; and we can not even afford to have a slightly faster train.

    Seems I usually hear about benefits of leisure travel. What about business travel? You think about how much time is wasted between check-in, bag check, waiting at the gate (often without wireless), waiting to board, boarding, 15 minutes before and after to board…. All this time, you’re usually without a computer and usually without wireless. When you’re in the car, you can’t do anything but talk on the phone.

    Trains could be cheaper for business travel, but the intangible cost of productive hours gained back has to be pretty huge. I would use trains all the time for business travel if I had the option.

    #1048183

    zgreen
    Participant

    Slightly off topic, but how feasible would it be to restore Amtrak to Columbus in the meantime? It may not be HSR but I’ll take it over nothing.

    #1048215
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Slightly off topic, but how feasible would it be to restore Amtrak to Columbus in the meantime? It may not be HSR but I’ll take it over nothing.

    We would have Amtrak running today between Cincinnati-Dayton-Columbus-Cleveland if John Kasich wouldn’t have returned the $400 million to the feds that Ohio received to build it.

    So I’d say it’s not feasible at all while he’s in charge.

    The only way we might be getting HSR to Chicago is if it can be done without funding from the state.

    #1048590

    tk3000
    Participant

    It is amazing how one would distort and display statiscs to suit their message. The average has very little meaning in this context, nonetheless the distribution of wealth and the index of human development purports real meaning. The mainstay herein is that there are too many super rich people in America, so the average is high; but the poor in America often have to work two jobs just to be able to pay their bills and still leave in poverty. Funnily enough the super rich pay very little in taxes given that their income is mostly derived from capital gains.

    On the other hand, countries like Germany have Maglev (that literally gravitates on a magnetic field) High Speed Trains and rich speeds of 300 mph. The Fast Rail system is all other the place in Germany. And as far as the use of automobile goes, did you know that “In 2010, Germany produced more than 5.5 million automobiles; the U.S produced 2.7 million. At the same time, the average auto worker in Germany made $67.14 per hour in salary in benefits”

    #1073642

    News
    Participant

    Planning Work Continues on Columbus to Chicago High Speed Rail Idea
    April 27, 2015 10:09 am – Brent Warren

    Although it’s been nearly two years since we first reported on the proposal to build a high-speed passenger rail connection between Columbus and Chicago, the Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) has quietly kept up their planning efforts, coordinating communication among the local jurisdictions along the proposed line and supporting two separate proposals submitted last fall to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) that would pay for the next step in the process, a Tier One Environmental Impact Statement.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/planning-work-continues-on-columbus-to-chicago-high-speed-rail-idea-bw1

    #1123433
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    I can’t believe this was first mentioned nearly four years ago.

    #1123437
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    Feeling nostalgic? lol

    #1123438
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    Feeling nostalgic? lol

    Hah, I don’t know if nostalgic is the word I’d use to describe how I feel about it…

Viewing 8 posts - 241 through 248 (of 248 total)

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