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Poindexter Village Redevelopment - News & Updates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Poindexter Village Redevelopment – News & Updates

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 174 total)
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  • #407712
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    I’ll weigh in…..tear it down.

    #407713

    people211
    Member

    Snarf wrote >>

    people211 wrote >>
    Hmmm… this thread took a turn somewhere… Not too many people wanna weigh in on it…

    weigh in on it then..

    Are they planning anything else for this site, besides more “moderately” priced condos?

    It would be nice to see something built there that could actually help remedy the issues of the area as opposed to just transplanting them to another area..

    And if there is something like that already in the works, then stick an imaginary fork in me,.. cuz i’ll be done with the topic..

    #407714

    BCNation
    Participant

    KingLincolnUrbanEnthusiast wrote >>
    Adding to the thread!
    Also, my comments are in the present tense – I am speaking about the last 20 years to the present – today. I am sure in 1940 they were respectable, but they are just terrible now, there is a shooting there every night and a dope deal at 5 Brothers (Champion and Long) every hour – just ask the Columbus Police and the Fire Department what the real deal is – this place is bad karma and just plain bad – we called it growing up the PRISON!

    What’s taking Coleman so long to tear it down?

    #407715

    Local trouble makers that can’t let go of the past and the mayor’s election.

    After Coleman is re-elected they will razed. They are a terrible blight on the area and the city. The projects are history – people will be given vouchers. Concentrations of poor, uneducated, jobless and destitute people with a crimnal and gang culture is a bad mix and does not help folks escape the situation and become productive members of society – these urban segregated ghettos encourage more crime and dependency! The sooner they are completely empty and taken down the better for the people who lived there and the city – imho

    #407716
    Chris Sherman
    Chris Sherman
    Participant

    Not sure if it has much to do with Coleman. It’s a CMHA HUD issue.

    #407717

    The other point is that CMHA is broke – perhaps they are working on getting the money to raze as well – but good point

    #407718
    Chris Sherman
    Chris Sherman
    Participant

    Yeah that was the big hold up with riverside Bradley. First their vouchers were delayed then the money woes. Well 3 years later it’s finally empty and hopefully coming down this summer.

    #407719

    sixby9is42
    Member

    KingLincolnUrbanEnthusiast wrote >>
    Local trouble makers that can’t let go of the past and the mayor’s election.
    After Coleman is re-elected they will razed. They are a terrible blight on the area and the city. The projects are history – people will be given vouchers. Concentrations of poor, uneducated, jobless and destitute people with a crimnal and gang culture is a bad mix and does not help folks escape the situation and become productive members of society – these urban segregated ghettos encourage more crime and dependency! The sooner they are completely empty and taken down the better for the people who lived there and the city – imho

    Counterpoint:

    [b]The Atlantic: American Murder Mystery[/b]

    [i]Why is crime rising in so many American cities? The answer implicates one of the most celebrated antipoverty programs of recent decades.[/i]

    [b]Excerpt:[/b] Once-quiet apartment complexes full of young families “suddenly started turning hot on us.” Instead of the occasional break-in, Barnes was getting calls about armed robberies, gunshots in the hallways, drug dealers roughing up their neighbors. A gang war ripped through the neighborhood. “We thought, What the hell is going on here?” A gang war! In North Memphis! “All of a sudden it was a damn war zone,” he said.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/american-murder-mystery/6872/1/

    #407720

    SusanB
    Participant

    The Atlantic Monthly article certainly rings true with our experiences here on the south side of Columbus. Also I suspect on Hilltop too. Our crime rates spiked when Lincoln Village started closing and issuing vouchers. It does seem to be settling down somewhat (thanks to aggressive work by the CPD), but the type of crime certainly changed, from garage and car break ins to home burglaries, something we almost never saw before this year. Most folks in HVS did not have/need home alarms, now most do.

    #407721

    labi
    Participant

    That’s a super, super interesting Atlantic Monthly article. It deserves its own thread. But – speaking as a resident of a neighborhood that has a huge concentration of project-based Section 8, a very small percentage of which has been dispersed, (not to mention the large number of landlords accepting Section 8 vouchers) my question is still “Why should my neighborhood have to bear the consequences of generational poverty alone?” Is it really unjust to spread the burden more evenly around the city? Would spreading that burden help others to understand that dysfunctional families do exist and do require our collective attention?

    Right now it seems very easy for those not experiencing the neighborhood effects in their own neighborhood to just talk about how “individual responsibility” (not government programs or other collective action) should solve the problems and act like if you live in a high-crime neighborhood, you should live with it without complaint because after all, you did choose to live in that neighborhood.

    One idea that comes to mind is that more attention should be paid to the distribution of properties approved to accept Section 8 vouchers. Just like the the project-based Section 8 properties, they should not be allowed to concentrate. And landlords who accept the vouchers should be expected to supervise their tenants and property just as stringently as the best project-based Section 8 managers do.

    #407722

    SusanB
    Participant

    Good points labi. What the article deftly points out is that the closing of the “projects” does NOT move these folks into the high end areas (think SN, Clintonville, Bexley) but rather to the already struggling working class areas (South Side, Hilltop) and can sink them. Unfortunately at the present there is no legal way to control whether a landlord takes vouchers, thus allowing these already poor and at risk areas to get worse. The staggering amount of monies that the vouchers will pay (way above market in most areas, ie $800 for a 2 bedroom and $1000 for a 3 bedroom) tempts many a landlord in areas where the average non voucher rents are far lower. There’s a lot of money in play in the low income housing biz.

    #407723

    Excerpt: Once-quiet apartment complexes full of young families “suddenly started turning hot on us.” Instead of the occasional break-in, Barnes was getting calls about armed robberies, gunshots in the hallways, drug dealers roughing up their neighbors. A gang war ripped through the neighborhood. “We thought, What the hell is going on here?” A gang war

    This is why Poindexter needs to come down and be razed. This is Poindexter village 24/7,365 days a year!

    The village and the tower need to be emptied and bombed! This place is full of animals last night 5 shots where heard in this lovely village – give me a break! Give the residents vouchers to move and quickly take it down ! IMHO

    #407724

    sixby9is42
    Member

    KingLincolnUrbanEnthusiast wrote >>
    Excerpt: Once-quiet apartment complexes full of young families “suddenly started turning hot on us.” Instead of the occasional break-in, Barnes was getting calls about armed robberies, gunshots in the hallways, drug dealers roughing up their neighbors. A gang war ripped through the neighborhood. “We thought, What the hell is going on here?” A gang war
    This is why Poindexter needs to come down and be razed. This is Poindexter village 24/7,365 days a year!
    The village and the tower need to be emptied and bombed! This place is full of animals last night 5 shots where heard in this lovely village – give me a break! Give the residents vouchers to move and quickly take it down ! IMHO

    That’s what happened after people were kicked out and given vouchers. They moved somewhere else but the criminals among them didn’t stop causing trouble. The article stated some examples like this: New York City is much safer these days, but that doesn’t mean the criminals gave up. They moved to New Jersey.

    Another excerpt:

    One recent study publicized by HUD warned that policy makers should lower their expectations, because [b]voucher recipients seemed not to be spreading out, as they had hoped, but clustering together.[/b]

    #407725

    DCist
    Member

    One large issue that no one has addressed is that these people are getting S8 Vouchers to move, that doesnt mean the number of landlords accepting the vouchers has increased AT ALL. It may seem tempting for a landlord to accept S8, but there is already a deficit of these units for those with existing vouchers.

    Just because you are given a voucher doesnt mean you are guaranteed a unit.

    I have mixed feelings about the closure of these “projects” since I work for a homelessness assistance program. I think spreading out high-risk tenants are a good idea, when you have watchful, responsible people surrounding you, its less tempting to cause trouble and knowing you will get evicted and lose your voucher permanently is also a deterrent.

    However, on the flip side, there is the tendency to cluster, creating the same atmosphere as the “projects” especially since the properties that accept vouchers are typically already not the best nor are they in the best areas usually.

    There is no perfect solution thats for sure (and a damn shame).

    #407726

    SusanB
    Participant

    DCist, it is very hard to evict a voucher tenant. It really doesn’t work as a deterrent. When I first bought my duplex there was an existing voucher tenant and I wound up offering her money to leave because evicting her proved impossible.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 174 total)

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