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Cincinnati Development News & Updates

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Cincinnati Development News & Updates

This topic contains 182 replies, has 40 voices, and was last updated by King Gambrinus King Gambrinus 3 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 183 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1112430
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    Awesome project for Cincy

    #1118340

    Walter_White
    Participant

    A couple cool new projects planned in the Queen City..

    HEIGHT! 25 story apartment tower planned on the riverbank next to the Purple People Bridge…

    http://www.cincinnati.com/story/money/2016/03/11/25-story-apartment-tower-planned-cincinnati-riverfront/81636556/

    Also, looks like the Streetcar may be already producing a ROI

    http://www.cincinnati.com/story/money/2016/03/11/developers-plan-downtown-condos-along-streetcar-line/81602824/

    #1118399
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    It’s nice how Cinci can attract nationwide developers, but, for some reason, we can’t. Nice project though. Would not mind them scoping out Columbus for another tower by our river. As for the streetcar, I can’t wait to ride it this summer from a ball game to OTR. Should be a unique and envious experience.

    #1118418

    ohbr
    Participant

    It’s nice how Cinci can attract nationwide developers, but, for some reason, we can’t. Nice project though. Would not mind them scoping out Columbus for another tower by our river.

    This. Our problem is solely that our own developers can’t go higher, but that for some reason, we don’t peak the interest of out of town investors, let alone international investors. I wonder if there is anything that can be done to change this?

    #1118466
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Jason Powell wrote:</div>
    It’s nice how Cinci can attract nationwide developers, but, for some reason, we can’t. Nice project though. Would not mind them scoping out Columbus for another tower by our river.

    This. Our problem is solely that our own developers can’t go higher, but that for some reason, we don’t peak the interest of out of town investors, let alone international investors. I wonder if there is anything that can be done to change this?

    You would think that with what seems like a new weekly #1 ranking in such and such that developers would take notice of the momentum in this city. After all, they follow the residents and the residents are moving here in droves. At this point, I would think that Columbus is as safe a bet as most other cities when it comes to urban residential demand. They can’t build them fast enough.

    #1118467

    JMan
    Participant

    We need to change it, somehow.

    #1118468

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Maybe the Columbus power structure doesn’t want them.

    #1118474

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Someone mentioned that there was a precedent being set in Clintonville when good projects are rejected. I’ve long been saying that developers in Columbus seem to lack the ability or will for major projects like that one in Cincinnati, but the precedent of underwhelming projects has also been firmly established all over the city, especially Downtown. There is near zero real push or expectation for significant construction, so why should national developers look to Columbus when there are cities in the same state that are ultimately much more open to them? Columbus seems to be content with 5-6 stories on High and demanding reductions whenever they exceed that. Despite what should otherwise be overwhelmingly favorable demographics/economics, no one is paying attention to a city that rejects the idea that it is a major population center.

    And before anyone jumps on me for saying that, name a peer city that is not seeing bigger construction projects than Columbus, or at the very least, even proposals for them. Columbus sees plenty of construction, but not to the level of a city rapidly approaching 900,000 people.

    #1118476

    ohbr
    Participant

    I don’t think outside developers are being scared away because they think that a major project downtown would be rejected or reduced. So developers haven’t been pushed to build taller so an outside developer who could is somehow deterred by that? seems pretty ridiculous that someone who may potentially build 20+ stories would be scared away because of the Downtown Commission, let along the IVC, UARB, CAC, and the VVC. I’d think it would be all the more worth it for the outside developer to come in and show up the “small dogs” and set new precedents downtown. It may very well be more political. Why give a parking lot away to an outside developer when you can give it away to your buddy?

    Either way, it’s worth a shot at getting some concrete answers from developers or city leaders as to why we may not be able to attract outsiders.

    #1118479

    JMan
    Participant

    How have other cities gotten past this problem?

    #1118480

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    I don’t think outside developers are being scared away because they think that a major project downtown would be rejected or reduced. So developers haven’t been pushed to build taller so an outside developer who could is somehow deterred by that? seems pretty ridiculous that someone who may potentially build 20+ stories would be scared away because of the Downtown Commission, let along the IVC, UARB, CAC, and the VVC. I’d think it would be all the more worth it for the outside developer to come in and show up the “small dogs” and set new precedents downtown. It may very well be more political. Why give a parking lot away to an outside developer when you can give it away to your buddy?

    Either way, it’s worth a shot at getting some concrete answers from developers or city leaders as to why we may not be able to attract outsiders.

    I think if so, it’s more likely that the private Columbus power structure is against them than the public one.

    #1118487

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    I don’t think outside developers are being scared away because they think that a major project downtown would be rejected or reduced. So developers haven’t been pushed to build taller so an outside developer who could is somehow deterred by that? seems pretty ridiculous that someone who may potentially build 20+ stories would be scared away because of the Downtown Commission, let along the IVC, UARB, CAC, and the VVC. I’d think it would be all the more worth it for the outside developer to come in and show up the “small dogs” and set new precedents downtown. It may very well be more political. Why give a parking lot away to an outside developer when you can give it away to your buddy?

    Either way, it’s worth a shot at getting some concrete answers from developers or city leaders as to why we may not be able to attract outsiders.

    Of course it is just a theory, but there are few that would really make much sense. Columbus has long been a top 20 largest city and has long been steadily growing at double-digit percentages. It has high education levels, relatively low cost of living, favorable population demographics, etc. Yet the city continuously gets bypassed, not only nationally, but within its own state. Something is wrong, and if it isn’t the development community and expectations, I’d love to hear other theories on why this is.

    #1118488

    ohbr
    Participant

    Me too. Which is why I think it may be a great topic for this media outlet who specializes in and works with developers and city leaders on a regular basis to use that to their advantage and ask questions along these lines for their readers and come up with more solid reasoning as to why we’re overlooked rather than us trying to figure it out using city data, skyscraper websites, etc.

    Of course they don’t owe us any answers but it’s worth a shot.

    #1118489
    Stephen43215
    Stephen43215
    Participant

    Native to Columbus I moved to Las Vegas for 2 years. This past week I made my way across country to D.C stopping in several large cities along the way and every time I mention Columbus as my home most people have to ask with a question “Ohio”? I love Columbus but this city really needs to step up their game to have the “Wow” factor for visitors want to come back and talk about Columbus as being an amazing city!

    #1118490

    drew
    Participant

    Maybe the Columbus power structure doesn’t want them.

    I wonder that, too, and I wonder if they might have a point if it is true.

    So many of the large buildings downtown that were sorely underutilized in the past always made me wonder why basic market mechanics wouldn’t lower the rental prices to the point that they’d be appealing. The answer I’d get was that they were owned by outsiders who held them as a tiny part of a huge national portfolio, and they didn’t really care if one or two buildings in Columbus were occupied. Occasionally there may even be benefits to businesses who own a building that shows a loss.

    As such, there may be some valid arguments for not ceding swathes of the city to outside developers – if it’s to their benefit to leave a gaping hole of inactivity in the middle of our downtown, they’ll do it. I know that short term flashy development announcements are sexy, but I do think it’s a shame that long term sustainability isn’t more appealing. It’s certainly more important.

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