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Charlotte Streetcar & Light Rail News

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Charlotte Streetcar & Light Rail News

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)
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  • #74447
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    wbt.com wrote Charlotte streetcar update

    Charlotte, NC, 04.19.2008

    Some Charlotte City officials would like to see planning accelerated for the streetcar project but how to fund it is still up in the air.

    The ten-mile line, running from Eastland Mall through Uptown and up Beatties Ford Road is estimated to cost up-to 30-million dollars per mile.

    Transit Chief Keith Parker says they’re looking for potential funding from the feds but, he says, with the Presidential election and other things going on in Washington the likelyhood of any federal action occuring between now and January is almost nill.

    The streetcar is projected to run up about 16-thousand daily trips, more than the current light rail line, and would replace three of the busiest bus routes in Charlotte.

    READ MORE

    #197332

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    A streetcar line that would replace 3 lines!

    Now THAT’s a great justification for a streetcar!

    If Columbus had a justification, it just might fly!!

    #197333
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    BCOZ wrote A streetcar line that would replace 3 lines!

    Now THAT’s a great justification for a streetcar!

    If Columbus had a justification, it just might fly!!

    Yes, after the success of the Heritage Trolley that Charlotte started in 96 (you know, much like a starter line) that ran for about 2 miles in a straight line?

    You know, this one…

    Property values in the corridor have increased by 89.6%. Today, more than $600 million in private funds have been invested in the development of over 800,000 square feet of space along South End’s trolley corridor. In the Fall of 2007, the Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) will offer trolley and light rail service along this corridor, leading to even greater levels of development, and connecting Uptown and South End even more closely.

    #197334

    surber17
    Participant

    BCOZ wrote A streetcar line that would replace 3 lines!

    Now THAT’s a great justification for a streetcar!

    If Columbus had a justification, it just might fly!!

    Also, I know one of the ideas being kicked around was if the streetcar was a success the number 2 buses could be used in sections that really needed more bus routes. Also, just to throw this in there, yesterday I read a couple posts that talked about the streetcar causing more traffic. During one of Mike Reese’s presentations he showed how it would condense people (thus less cars) and cause less traffic. Just wanted to throw that out there.

    #197335

    gramarye
    Participant

    Later expansions of the Columbus line would be able to replace additional COTA routes. However, I’m not sure why the ostensible reallocation of the current #2 buses to other routes is such a selling point, because I thought the city actually had a bus surplus–thought someone mentioned that on these boards just a couple of days ago, actually.

    #197336

    surber17
    Participant

    gramarye wrote Later expansions of the Columbus line would be able to replace additional COTA routes. However, I’m not sure why the ostensible reallocation of the current #2 buses to other routes is such a selling point, because I thought the city actually had a bus surplus–thought someone mentioned that on these boards just a couple of days ago, actually.

    After reading people’s complaints it sounds like they want more buses/routes. This was just speculation though, I haven’t read any facts behind it.

    #197337

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    I don’t know why a viable streetcar network in the old city Columbus combined with a commuter rail to the suburbs and an improved COTA as the circulator wouldn’t work here. It’s a system most major cities (or at least similar) have in place. Buses are great in condensed local areas with many stops or as express buses with few stops and greater geographic area. They can’t do both and still be an efficient form of transit.

    #197338
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    news14.com wrote Streetcar Project looks for momentum

    Tuesday, May 13, 2008

    By: Brad Broders

    CHARLOTTE — Monday night, city leaders weighed in on a first step for a second transit option linking east and west Charlotte. CATS is proposing the Charlotte Streetcar Project to ride on tracks between Beatties Ford Road and Central Avenue.

    Rudy Collins is one of those who wonders is Charlotte leaders could be doing more to help her and others who work in east Charlotte. “It’s a growing city, and it just needs more options of transportation,” said Collins.

    CATS leaders asked the city for up to $500,000 so they could further study a new route, starting at the Rosa Parks Center on Beatties Ford Rd., passing through Trade Street and Elizabeth Avenue in Uptown, and ending at the Eastland Mall Transit Center on Central Avenue.

    READ MORE

    #197339
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    charlotte.com wrote CAN CHARLOTTE MIMIC PORTLAND?

    DAN TIERNEY

    Since opening in 2001, the streetcar system in Portland, Ore., has seen a boom of development near the streetcar line and more than double the weekday ridership.

    The Charlotte City Council now wants to know whether Charlotte can find the same success.

    Council members recently approved a $500,000 streetcar study to be conducted by the Charlotte Economic Development Office and Charlotte Area Transit System to determine, among other things:

    • An updated cost estimate.

    • Economic benefits.

    • Charlotte’s eligibility for federal funding.

    The study’s approval could mean that Charlotte would try to build the first leg by 2013, rather than its pushed-back date of 2018. The city, though, faces numerous hurdles, including funding issues and other transportation projects.

    READ MORE

    #197340
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    governing.com wrote More than Just a Train

    June 2008 By ALEX MARSHALL

    Iding the spiffy silver and blue trains of Charlotte’s new light-rail line, I watch through the train’s windows how cranes and excavators push around dirt for new development projects. Back when urban junkies — myself included — dreamed that cities could center around train lines, we railed at the formula-oriented developers who could crank out only cul-de-sacs and subdivisions near the newest highway off-ramp. They ignored the possibility of putting apartment buildings and mixed-used projects beside a trolley line, even if a city could manage to get a rail line built.

    No longer. Now big international companies such as Cherokee Investment Partners, which is involved here in Charlotte, are poised — even eager — to swoop down, buy land and put up pedestrian-friendly businesses and homes around new transit stations. And they’re being joined by plenty of competitors.

    This is not to suggest that progress in Charlotte has been easy. Arranging streets, parking, condominiums, shops, plazas and other components of development around transit here involves many choices. Planners and developers still are struggling to balance the competing needs of parking and active street life in these new projects. But in terms of a market and a vision, there is increasing clarity. Living near a transit stop has become part of a tried-and-true formula of downtown living. Charlotte opened its $465 million, 15-stop, 10-mile “blue line” last November. LYNX, as it is called, has about 13,000 riders daily, well ahead of the low-ball federal projections. Now, the city and region are working on the many other ideas for lines and extensions. A total of 7,000 new condominiums are planned along the line.

    READ MORE

    #197341

    uncleboo
    Participant

    Hi folks – I’m one of those many lurkers reading your posts about streetcars and other things on this blog – Walker thanks for keeping this together.

    I’m moved to finally speak up because I recently witnessed first hand the renaissance in Charlotte. 10 years after my last visit to Charlotte I was there 3 weeks ago and was shocked in the difference in their city, and alarmed at how much more “vital” it felt than Columbus. We spent the better part of a Saturday afternoon just walking the streets of downtown Charlotte – went to a museum, had lunch outside, etc. etc. etc. and were by no means alone. Their new performing arts theater (take note, CSO), their obvious redevelopment of old building and simultaneous erection of new buildings – heck, even the streetscapes with full grown trees and annuals – were a far cry from Columbus.

    Now I won’t say this has everything to do with the addition of rail transit or the vision of city leaders or civic minded grass-roots people, but in a town that boasts as much sprawl as Charlotte has it is awfully impressive to see their voters reject a repeal of their own sales tax in favor of mass transit.

    I hate the “city envy” that we in CBus seemingly wear on our shoulders like some middle child syndrome (in this case symbolically between Cinci and Cleveland) but if we could manage to get away from our own fears and actually learn from our neighbors to the south it would be mighty impressive.

    How many people tonight (or tomorrow) are planning on taking the bus from the Arts Festival to the Park Street festival/Gallery Hop? Not many is my guess – most will walk or drive. Now imagine that same trip on the trolley.

    #197342

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    I don’t know if it is so much a city envy. I think Columbus has a lot that is unique to it that makes it great.

    The fact is that every city goes through growth and decline, growth and decline. We had a viable streetcar network and a wonderful city infrastructure. That was ripped out, our building torn down and paved under for parking. I think that it is important for a city to address the needs of its citizens and the needs of its city.

    Hopefully this is a starter line and will allow us to continue to lay track and offer a true multi-modal system.

    #197343

    Elizabeth Lessner
    Participant

    uncleboo wrote I hate the “city envy” that we in CBus seemingly wear on our shoulders like some middle child syndrome (in this case symbolically between Cinci and Cleveland)

    I see mostly civic pride on the shoulders of my peers. I choose to be here like so many others here in Columbus. I am a proud transplant and I love this town. Many of us work daily to make broad, bold and concerted efforts to better this City. And yep, sometimes we look towards other cities to see what works. Not because we are envious but because we see opportunities to grow and evolve in the ways that we like. Charlotte’s done right, so has Portland, Houston and lots of other places. Lets take their ideas and make them work here. I’m proud of Columbus, let’s push forward.

    #197344
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    charlotteobserver.com wrote CATS: Put light rail on faster track

    By Steve Harrison

    Posted: Sunday, Oct. 19, 2008

    After meeting with federal transit officials last week, CATS chief executive Keith Parker said he’s still optimistic the federal government could pay up to 80 percent of the construction cost for new light-rail projects.

    But if that request fails, Parker said he’ll likely brainstorm other ways to raise money so rail lines can be built sooner.

    Parker met last week with James Simpson, head of the Federal Transit Administration, about increasing Washington D.C.’s role in Charlotte transit projects. Parker said he hopes to have a tentative answer before the end of the Bush administration.

    Parker asked the FTA to pay for 80 percent of the northeast light-rail extension, a commuter rail line to the Lake Norman area, and improvements to the existing light-rail line.

    He said he’ll drop his request for commuter rail funding, and concentrate on money for the Lynx Blue Line. Parker said the FTA told him it doesn’t have enough money to fund all three.

    “We will go back to them with a more modest request at this point,” Parker said.

    READ MORE

    #197345

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    [url=http://www.charlotteobserver.com/local/story/523880.html]Weak economy may alter city’s rail plans[/url]
    By Steve Harrison
    [email protected]
    Posted: Sunday, Feb. 08, 2009

    With this grim backdrop, the Charlotte City Council is scheduled to hear a presentation Monday night that’s more suited to the good old days of 2006: Whether the city can fast-track construction of a $400 million streetcar through central Charlotte.

    The study will examine the streetcar’s economic impact, and whether that money could be harnessed to build it ahead of schedule.

    If the economy were strong, having the city take the lead in building the 10-mile streetcar would be politically attractive, and perhaps economically feasible.

    But today, I doubt the numbers are going to work.

    And I’m not sure CATS is particularly enthused about the streetcar right now, especially with two other construction projects looming – the commuter train to Lake Norman and a Lynx Blue Line extension.

    It’s possible the transit agency may need the city’s money to construct the light-rail extension, arguably the higher priority.

    READ MORE

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 29 total)

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