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Change your Twitter location to Tehran

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Change your Twitter location to Tehran

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)
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  • #280682

    Hael
    Member

    JonMyers wrote >>
    I was reading the Ted Blog and an interview with Clay Shirky on Twitter and Iran. Really good stuff.
    http://blog.ted.com/2009/06/qa_with_clay_sh.php

    Someone tweeted from Tehran today that “the American media may not care, but the American people do.” That’s a sea-change.

    If true, that is really good.

    #280683

    misskitty
    Participant

    That letter sounds like one of those Email scams about the person who’s accounts have been locked so if you could just let us into your computer….

    I know that’s not it
    But I still can’t get how Twitter is going to help them.

    #280684

    JonMyers
    Participant

    @Hael – I definitely think a large slice of the American people care. A book I read about 6 years ago helped shape my POV on the role of the citizen, and the democratization of technologies of coordination and communication. It’s called Smart Mobs by Howard Rheingold. A great book I highly recommend for those curious: http://bit.ly/A9Qu5

    #280685

    joev
    Participant

    Revolution is the goal, right? Street protests are just noise. They totally worked in 1968. If getting Nixon elected was the plan… And then regime change/nation building? We have some recent case studies in that neighborhood that show that isn’t so easy. I don’t think the average person can help Iranians right now.

    I want to say that a new revolution in Iran would be a good thing, because people should be free to speak, free to walk around without covering their entire bodies, free to practice whichever version or whichever religion (or none) they choose. But what would happen next? The keys of the country get handed over to the leaders of these protests?

    I think the best thing for the US to do with Iran is to stay out of its business. And offer assylum to Iranians who are persecuted by the theocratic state. Let’s take a page out of Canada’s playbook for this one. That seems like what Obama is planning, anyhow. The Canadian foreign minister actually had stronger words about the situation than Obama did.

    #280686

    rory
    Participant

    The role of Twitter is pretty interesting but it doesn’t change the fact that Mousavi is just bad news. He’s been Guardian Council approved just like Ahmanedinejad and he was a international human rights pariah in the 80s. He might be slightly less corrupt than the others but he’s still killed hundreds of political prisoners. And he severed ties with Great Britain because they wouldn’t disavow Salmon Rushdie and he supported the seizing of the American Emabssy. I can see twittering for getting rid of Khamenei,Ahmanedinejad, and Mousavi but I don’t see twittering for someone who practiced crimes against humanity and suppression of basic human rights.

    Can you twitter for schadenfreude because I think there are some nervous Revolutionary Guards out there. Personally I hope the whole lot of them goes down and they get an real democracy, not an approved one.

    #280687

    Hael
    Member

    JonMyers wrote >>
    @Hael – I definitely think a large slice of the American people care. A book I read about 6 years ago helped shape my POV on the role of the citizen, and the democratization of technologies of coordination and communication. It’s called Smart Mobs by Howard Rheingold. A great book I highly recommend for those curious: http://bit.ly/A9Qu5

    I believe the vast majority of Americans are cool, compassionate, caring peeps that want peace and do empathize with folks living in places like Iran where freedom doesn’t ring, at all.

    Unfortunately, I am highly skeptical of this “revolution”. As rory pointed out and as did I, be it Ahmanedinejad or the other guy, is much really going to change? Other than the fact that the real rulers of Iran, Islamic Shadow Priests (with full epic T7 gear) may realize that they need to get intouch with the younger generation and their fancy twitter/internets.

    PS. @Jon, thanks for the book referral.

    #280688

    Bear
    Participant

    I do wonder whether the possibility of instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.

    That seems to be the argument that’s being taken for granted in the media here, and it’s got a fair bit of surface plausibility — in a police state where individual protest is very dangerous, you may be more likely to hit the streets if you know that others are contemplating doing the same thing. Certainly the logic behind the govt. shutting down cell phones. But on the other hand, I’m not sure that, in this case, there were actually that many Iranian twitter users working up to a critical mass.

    #280689

    adrock
    Member

    why the heck not.

    #280690

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    jkostelac wrote >>

    Rockmastermike wrote >>

    jkostelac wrote >>
    I have to disagree, if Iran’s inability to Photoshop is any clue I honestly think it can cause enough confusion to help protect people trying to get the word out.

    the mear fact the the internet and phone services do function most of the time mean that you can’t entirely depend on the incompetence, and speaking as a former network administrator, it would take a LOT of incompetence not to know how to run a network sniffer.

    True enough, but it’s so little effort and risk on our part, it is worth trying.

    didn’t say it wasn’t worth doing as a symbolic gesture if you are so inclined, just don’t expect it would even make a dent in the security of the situation or keep anyone out of prison once the mop-up begins.

    For that setting up encrypted proxies (https NOT HTTP) will be more useful (if you are so inclined). Set up an https server that does a second proxy redirect to an http proxy on the same machine that proxies http to twitter and you’re good to go. Do it right and it’ll be nearly uncrackable and outgoing messages will look like garbage to the sniffers.

    #280691

    Jim Lauwers
    Participant

    If you’re really interested in helping, you might want to check out Why We Protest’s special Iran page. I respectfully disagree with RMM in that Tor is a both easier and a better use of a proxy server than HTTPS, but creating an actual channel for people to talk through is really the way to go. If, you know, you think the Iranian people aren’t already getting through well enough.

    #280692

    Hael
    Member

    Bear wrote >>
    I do wonder whether the possibility of instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.
    That seems to be the argument that’s being taken for granted in the media here, and it’s got a fair bit of surface plausibility — in a police state where individual protest is very dangerous, you may be more likely to hit the streets if you know that others are contemplating doing the same thing. Certainly the logic behind the govt. shutting down cell phones. But on the other hand, I’m not sure that, in this case, there were actually that many Iranian twitter users working up to a critical mass.

    echoing adrock, yes, why the heck not. certainly, instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely. The Question of the hour: Is it enough to move the firmly entrenched powers that be?

    I say no. In this case, it will require violence, sadly. /realist.

    #280693

    Bear
    Participant

    Hael wrote >>

    Bear wrote >>
    I do wonder whether the possibility of instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.
    That seems to be the argument that’s being taken for granted in the media here, and it’s got a fair bit of surface plausibility — in a police state where individual protest is very dangerous, you may be more likely to hit the streets if you know that others are contemplating doing the same thing. Certainly the logic behind the govt. shutting down cell phones. But on the other hand, I’m not sure that, in this case, there were actually that many Iranian twitter users working up to a critical mass.

    echoing adrock, yes, why the heck not. certainly, instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.

    Well, to play Devil’s advocate, because the number of Twitter users in Iran seems to be a pretty small fraction of the number of protesters.

    #280694

    Hael
    Member

    Bear wrote >>

    Hael wrote >>

    Bear wrote >>
    I do wonder whether the possibility of instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.
    That seems to be the argument that’s being taken for granted in the media here, and it’s got a fair bit of surface plausibility — in a police state where individual protest is very dangerous, you may be more likely to hit the streets if you know that others are contemplating doing the same thing. Certainly the logic behind the govt. shutting down cell phones. But on the other hand, I’m not sure that, in this case, there were actually that many Iranian twitter users working up to a critical mass.

    echoing adrock, yes, why the heck not. certainly, instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.

    Well, to play Devil’s advocate, because the number of Twitter users in Iran seems to be a pretty small fraction of the number of protesters.

    Hmmm. So maybe the credit to Twitter is exaggerated.

    #280695

    Daz
    Participant

    Hael wrote >>

    Bear wrote >>

    Hael wrote >>

    Bear wrote >>
    I do wonder whether the possibility of instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.
    That seems to be the argument that’s being taken for granted in the media here, and it’s got a fair bit of surface plausibility — in a police state where individual protest is very dangerous, you may be more likely to hit the streets if you know that others are contemplating doing the same thing. Certainly the logic behind the govt. shutting down cell phones. But on the other hand, I’m not sure that, in this case, there were actually that many Iranian twitter users working up to a critical mass.

    echoing adrock, yes, why the heck not. certainly, instantaneous mass communication makes mass action more likely.

    Well, to play Devil’s advocate, because the number of Twitter users in Iran seems to be a pretty small fraction of the number of protesters.

    Hmmm. So maybe the credit to Twitter is exaggerated.

    In a way… part of the way I was finding out about any of the stuff going on over there originally was because of all of the pictures circulating through services like twitpic.

    At the end of the day, it definitely provided a lot of eye witness accounts.

    #280696

    JonMyers
    Participant
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 45 total)

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