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Cat Question

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  • #304171

    groundrules
    Participant

    misskitty wrote >>
    Dear Veterinarian ,
    Has your place of business had any experience with Pet insurance?
    Do you think it is helpful or not?
    Have you heard good or bad things about it?
    What is your opinion on it?

    I can tell you what my vet’s experience/advice was. She said if I wanted to do it, the company she recommended was VPI (http://www.petinsurance.com/). She told me that the insurance through ASPCA was problematic- not being responsive to owners, slow payment, paperwork issues with vets, etc. They also continue to send me spammish emails, which is not an deal breaker but an annoyance.

    I’d second the notion about starting it early. It’s not cheap though. I decided that for two animals, I’d be better off socking away the 60 bucks a month and hoping that I’d get many healthy years out of them. but yeah, the first time either one of us walks into the ER at medvet (hopefully never, knock on wood), we’re both gonna wish we had it.

    #304172

    misskitty
    Participant

    groundrules wrote >>

    misskitty wrote >>
    Dear Veterinarian ,
    Has your place of business had any experience with Pet insurance?
    Do you think it is helpful or not?
    Have you heard good or bad things about it?
    What is your opinion on it?

    I can tell you what my vet’s experience/advice was. She said if I wanted to do it, the company she recommended was VPI (http://www.petinsurance.com/). She told me that the insurance through ASPCA was problematic- not being responsive to owners, slow payment, paperwork issues with vets, etc. They also continue to send me spammish emails, which is not an deal breaker but an annoyance.
    I’d second the notion about starting it early. It’s not cheap though. I decided that for two animals, I’d be better off socking away the 60 bucks a month and hoping that I’d get many healthy years out of them. but yeah, the first time either one of us walks into the ER at medvet (hopefully never, knock on wood), we’re both gonna wish we had it.

    Thanks for the Information, Very helpful indeed.

    #304173
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>
    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less.

    I am just wondering what might be the reason for my estimate having such a wide range.
    $380 is very different from $760.

    Too hard to say without seeing your cats teeth, its age, or health. The range may include extractions, xrays, fluid therapy, extra long anesthetic time if involved, pre-anesthetic testing of heart, kidneys, liver, etc. Take the 2 estimates, put them side to side and examine the costs and see what is included on one and not on the other. If they include the exact same things, then one place is just more expensive. I have a feeling the more expensive place quoted for all contingencies.

    What I meant is that my quote from one vet was $380-$760. So if I get the procedure done there, I can expect to pay ANYWHERE in that range.

    I am guessing you have an older cat with a pretty bad old cat mouth, although I have seen some rotten mouths on young cats as well. They have a whole host of species specific diseases and cats especially can have a bad mouth at a young age due to resorptive disease. If so this is a pretty normal quote to me. Your vet will not know exactly what is going to happen with the mouth until they get the pet under anesthesia(not sedated, I mean general anesthesia, cats do not rinse and spit, you have to protect the airway) and can do an exam of the teeth with the probes.(Same ones a human dentist uses). Each tooth has to be evaluated for health and stability and if it is bad, may need extracted. XRay of the teeth may need to be taken to evaluate periodontal health. If there is tartar covering the tooth you dont know what you will get until it is cleaned. They dont know how long the procedure will be before going in. It is much better if you let a client know up front that it could be that much instead of surprising them at pickup time. I am sure that your vet would have no problem going over exactly what they want to do, what the concerns are, what possible difficulties they expect, etc if you call them and ask to discuss the procedure further. I encourage you to do this as I think you have questions.

    #304174

    Lorence
    Participant

    We attribute the long life our first cat had to continuing dental care her entire life. She died 12/26/07 at the age of 20 years, 3+ months:
    http://lorencesing.com/Emily.html
    http://lorenceskitchen.blogspot.com/search?q=emily

    She was cared for by the wonderful folks at Suburban Animal Clinic (at Wilson and Fisher – Thanks, Dr Siemer!) for all but the first couple of months of her life. They have always stressed the importance of good dental care for both Felines and canines. Our “new” cat (an “adopted” 9 year old boy) had to have extensive dental work, a heavy cleaning and a tooth pulled, but afterward, it was like he had been reborn! HE became much more friendly and loving. This was because the tooth that was pulled was causing him a lot of pain, just as a bad tooth would in a human.

    I highly recommend keeping up with your pet’s dental care, be it feline of canine.

    #304175

    As others have said, this is something that does often need to be done. However, cats are like people. Some of them build tartar and some don’t. Some have gum issues and some don’t. I have five cats and two of them are tartar formers.

    My vet is in Powell and is pretty pricey but very clean and professional. We just had one of our cats’ teeth cleaned, no extractions, for a cost of about $250. It’s the extractions and other things that are needed (treatment of abscesses, etc.) that drive the price up.

    Have a good look at your cat’s teeth yourself. If there are gum problems or tartar buildup (look at the back molars where they join the gum, if you can do it without being bitten) then the teeth do need to be cleaned. Putting it off isn’t going to do your cat or your pocketbook any favors.

    #304176

    Amy D wrote: “The vet has the cat on some kind of restricted calorie diet with special food and all that and yet, it still pukes.”

    If the food is prescribed for the express purpose of stopping the hurling, then I’d say go back to another food! One of our cats simply has a delicate tummy, and our vet recommended giving him 5 mg of the generic (unflavored tablet) Prilosec every evening. They come in 10 mg tablets so that’s half a tablet. After a few evenings he stopped hurling everything he came into contact with, so he gets one every night now. Check with your vet and see if he recommends it.

    We also cannot give Teddums anything except his dry cat food, which right now is Hills WD. He still chunks up every now and then, so it helped to switch to a food that is closer to the color of our carpet.

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