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Cat Question

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  • #304154

    catnfiddle
    Participant

    There may be no accounting for cats, but the fuzz therapy is priceless when she finds me when I’m sad and insists upon a cuddle. She also once had the good sense to puke on a picture of me with a gal who stole my college boyfriend. It almost makes up for the awful noises she makes when she’s winding up to hurl.

    Going back to the original topic, Pandora’s teeth are nearly pristine thanks to the Greenie crunchies recommended earlier. She can’t have them often these days because of her diabetes (my fault for overfeeding her), but her dental health is remarkable for an 11-year-old feline.

    #304156

    tornangel012
    Participant

    From all the positive Comments on Dr. Beer I am for sure going to call him up when I have a better job situation and can afford that $100.

    Also surprised no one has mentioned how totally RAD his last name is BEER!
    And if it wasn’t for my morning cuddles/suffocation with my Kilala life would be less radiant everyday.

    #304157

    groundrules
    Participant

    Tenzo wrote >>
    Dogs > Cats
    We brush Tenzo’s teeth once a week just before his shower.

    wait, showering it once a week is a plus?

    #304158

    nexttuesday
    Participant

    @puking cat sufferers: Buy a tube of hairball stuff (I got mine at wal-mart but I’m sure you can get it at any pet store). Not sure of the name of it, but it’s salmon-flavored and it’s a brown gel. You smear a glob of it on the cat’s paw and he’ll lick it off. It helps hair in the gut to bind together so they can pass it instead of having it sit in their stomach and make them throw up. I give it to both of my cats whenever one of them has puked, and it works.

    I also brush my cats’ teeth with a toothbrush and water every once in a while. One of my cats actually gave me the idea because she would chew on a toothbrush if she could reach it (yuck). It made me realize I should probably be brushing their teeth.

    #304159

    Bear
    Participant

    Rockmastermike wrote >>

    groundrules wrote >>

    Rockmastermike wrote >>
    my only question about cats is: How the hell can an organism evolve that pukes so much?! That cannot possibly be a successfully adaptive trait in any natural environment. Most creatures with issues like that go quickly and quietly extinct. I’m guessing we’ve messed up the ‘housecat’ by interbreeding or something dumb like that.

    yeah, and what’s up with those stupid owls?

    IIRC owls puke compacted balls of the indigestible bits before it hits the rest of their system. Bones, feathers, hair… etc… I can see that would save wear and tear on the system. Looks like an adaptive trait to me.
    Cats puke the totally digestible food that has supposedly been specially prepared to be easy on their systems.
    It makes no sense to me.
    Really, though… if anyone has any suggestions on how to keep the cat from barfing, please send them to catnfiddle. thanks. The vet has the cat on some kind of restricted calorie diet with special food and all that and yet, it still pukes.

    Yes on owls. They’re pretty amazing actually: their stomachs separate out the hair and skeletons etc. and let the rest pass, and then wrap the leftovers into a tidy package for convenient ejection. Pretty astounding system. (Very glad I don’t have such a system myself, as it would make dessert-course conversation rather awkward. But still, from a mechanical point of view, it’s a wonder.)

    As to cats, my mom has a purebred Abyssinian… precisely the sort of inbred creature to which you refer… and he’s got a talent for heaving up anything he can swallow. She finds that feeding him in smaller doses helps.

    #304160

    airreall
    Member

    I am a Vet Tech and from my work experience a lot of clinics do over charge. Its usually at least $30 to walk in the door and they have to do a physical exam and TPR every visit. Most likely will do blood work, urinalysis, and a fecal test, which all costs a pretty penny.
    As for Vet recommendations Dr. Beer is great, attentive and thorough. I work at OSU and only get my prescriptions there, otherwise i go to Dr. Beer for annual visits.
    For a cat dental – if you have any doubt in teeth and gum health then the cat should be put under and have its mouth examed and a teeth cleaning. If you are just looking at tartar build up – I hand scale my cats teeth monthly. You can buy the intruments online at many websites and they are under $20 and will last a lifetime. If you start hand scaling and feed dry food only at an early age then you shouldnt have to worry about teeth unless one gets loose or an abcess pops up.

    #304161
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less. Yep there are probably some less than honest people, also there are some straight shooters. If you like and trust the person you take your cat for then that is pretty important. Ask your veterinarian why if their dental is 100, why are others 500 and if other dentals are 100 dollars why is yours 500? Pay close attention to the answers. I am fully prepared to answer that question when someone asks me in the exam room. Make sure your vet does the same. The places I work for are not 100 dollar places, nor are they 500 dollar places. What answers do you get? Veterinary medicine and human medicine quite honestly are extremely similar. (Read that as they use the exact same tools, education, medicine, equipement, and research). You quite honestly are doing a cost benefit analysis. If you went in to a human surgeon and they gave you a piece of paper of the things that you could pick as options for a surgery which of these would you pick?

    1. experienced doctor
    2. trained/certified staff
    3. most upgraded facility
    4. newest techniques
    5. best critical care if something goes wrong.
    6. most up to date medicines/anesthetics
    7. most accurate anesthesia monitoring devices
    8. best diagnostic equipment
    9. most staff members per case.
    10. pre-anesthetic bloodwork/ekg/testing

    Any sane human would say I want every one of those. Different in veterinary medicine as you get to pick what you want. If those are important to you then ask about them. Make whatever choice you wish. I understand that the budget comes in to play, it does in my house as well. This post was not meant to steer you into a direction, or judge you in any way at all, just to educate you and make you ask questions. Anyone that is taking the best care that they can/afford for the pets they own gets a gold star from me. You will be rewarded for it someday. Truly. I have seen enough rotten pet owners that I know that anyone that cares enough to simply bring a pet into the clinic to see what is wrong is pretty special. I know that sometimes it is all we can do to keep them comfortable and happy. I wish I could treat them all for free, but then I and my staff would be out of business in a week. Plain and simple, most of the time the difference in price for a dental(or a spay, or neuter,etc) is how many of the list is included. As long as you are trying your best, you get no argument from me.

    #304162

    misskitty
    Participant

    Dear Veterinarian ,
    Has your place of business had any experience with Pet insurance?
    Do you think it is helpful or not?
    Have you heard good or bad things about it?
    What is your opinion on it?

    #304163

    AmyArt21
    Participant

    derm wrote >>
    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less.

    I am just wondering what might be the reason for my estimate having such a wide range.
    $380 is very different from $760.

    #304164

    twinrova
    Member

    your other option is not having her undergo the procedure at all.

    there is a product called petzlife that comes in a liquid spray or a gel (gel’s WAY easier) that you apply to the pet’s teeth every few days. after about two weeks, you’ll see genuinely amazing results. it’s about $20-$25 per bottle depending on where you go but it lasts a very long time as you only apply a very thin layer, especially in a mouth as small as a cat’s. it’s totally safe to use every day and can be used weekly for maintenance after you’ve achieved the results you want.

    i used it on my ferrets and let me tell you, it’s the fucking shit.

    we sell it at the complete petmart across from graceland on n high st. you can probably find it online, too, but we don’t charge shipping and i’m nice. :)

    #304165
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    misskitty wrote >>
    Dear Veterinarian ,
    Has your place of business had any experience with Pet insurance?
    Do you think it is helpful or not?
    Have you heard good or bad things about it?
    What is your opinion on it?

    It has its place. If you are going to get it. Start with a new puppy or kitten and sign up before the first exam. Like any insurance they ding you for pre-existing conditions, so if I hear a heart murmur the first exam, forget about cardiac diseases being covered if you have no insurance. It can be pretty good for paying for preventive care and disasters. They are usually re-imbursement payers.

    #304166
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>
    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less.

    I am just wondering what might be the reason for my estimate having such a wide range.
    $380 is very different from $760.

    Too hard to say without seeing your cats teeth, its age, or health. The range may include extractions, xrays, fluid therapy, extra long anesthetic time if involved, pre-anesthetic testing of heart, kidneys, liver, etc. Take the 2 estimates, put them side to side and examine the costs and see what is included on one and not on the other. If they include the exact same things, then one place is just more expensive. I have a feeling the more expensive place quoted for all contingencies.

    #304167

    Tenzo
    Participant

    groundrules wrote >>

    Tenzo wrote >>
    Dogs > Cats
    We brush Tenzo’s teeth once a week just before his shower.

    wait, showering it once a week is a plus?

    yep.
    He walks into the shower on his own.
    After the washing he walks out and rubs himself down with a towel until dry.

    #304168

    AmyArt21
    Participant

    derm wrote >>

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>
    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less.

    I am just wondering what might be the reason for my estimate having such a wide range.
    $380 is very different from $760.

    Too hard to say without seeing your cats teeth, its age, or health. The range may include extractions, xrays, fluid therapy, extra long anesthetic time if involved, pre-anesthetic testing of heart, kidneys, liver, etc. Take the 2 estimates, put them side to side and examine the costs and see what is included on one and not on the other. If they include the exact same things, then one place is just more expensive. I have a feeling the more expensive place quoted for all contingencies.

    What I meant is that my quote from one vet was $380-$760. So if I get the procedure done there, I can expect to pay ANYWHERE in that range.

    #304170

    karenS
    Member

    Amy, I think that’s correct – it would depend on exactly what your cat ended up needing once they got into it.

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