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Bustling Urban Neighborhoods Create Parking Tension

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Bustling Urban Neighborhoods Create Parking Tension

Viewing 15 posts - 121 through 135 (of 212 total)
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  • #546495

    InnerCore
    Participant

    rus said:
    So, how would you convince people coming to the short north to leave their cars at home in dublin, hilliard, or wherever?

    I would also like to point out that when I first came to this site, I was under the impression that most people had a backwards view of transit like you. However sine then I have been enlightened by Walker et al to the facts that actually there has BEEN a MAJORITY support for transit projects and the reason these projects weren’t getting approved was for political reason and not simply just a majority consensus.

    Ohio Senate OKs Passenger Rail Plan for 3C Corridor

    Also on Tuesday, Quinnipiac University released a poll that showed 64 percent of Ohio voters support passenger rail service between Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton and Cincinnati (3-C Corridor)….Republicans supported passenger rail too, 56 percent to 38 percen

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/1999/04/26/story3.html?page=all

    More than six in 10 of poll respondents said they are likely or somewhat likely to support a permanent tax levy if rail is included in the plan.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/poll/index.html?poll_id=7753&ana=e_du_pub

    Only 29% believe rail will never be built.

    Our old rail ideal in the late 90’s:

    http://www.sapersteinassociates.com/default.asp?contentID=574

    During the same week COTA killed plans for light-rail transit, 58 percent of surveyed Franklin County residents said they would support a November sales tax levy to pay for it, a Gallup Poll conducted for The Dispatch shows.

    So the reality is that there is and has been public interest in expanding public transportation.

    #546496
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    InnerCore said:

    So the reality is that there is and has been public interest in expanding public transportation.

    Well, some polls on a web site. Wow, that’s conclusive.

    #546497

    DavidF
    Participant

    I had a really nice dinner at Marcellas last night with a friend from out of town. I parked on High directly across from the restaurant and she parked around the corner, less than a block away.

    I’ve never had a major issue with parking in the SN. For me, the key has always been knowing when the best times to go there are. Conversely, if I plan something that happens around the busiest times, i.e. gallery hop, I consider parking a few blocks away (and honestly, it’s never been more than a couple of times I couldn’t park within a block or two of my destination) to be my “admission” charge for the chance to be somewhere a lot of people want to be.

    In my experience, parking is generally only a hassle for a couple of hours a day tops.

    #546498

    Graybeak
    Participant

    Awesome. OK! People want high speed trains, people want light rail, people want skittles falling from the sky.
    But, until these become reality, we still have a problem with parking.

    From what I understand, it takes much less time and money to build a parking garage, regardless of the profitability, than to build a fully functional rail transit system.
    Once the system is built, you could turn the parking garage into a train station, perhaps with a giant CoGo station in it to help folks get where they want to go once they arrive by train.

    As for the city paying to build a parking garage, I believe the garage on 4th St, between Gay and Long was built by, and owned by the city.
    CU Story – City Set to Build Two Downtown Parking Garages

    Here I see a story about the county expanding a parking garage.
    CU – Vine Street Parking Garage Expansion.

    I guess what I am ultimately saying is, you don’t have to focus all your resources to one ultimate dream ending. You do what you can to get by until your perfect situation is achieved.

    #546499

    InnerCore
    Participant

    rus said:
    No, I’m not against public transportation per se. I don’t see many people using it as it exists now; given the usage statistics that’s proven as a percentage of total population.

    AGAIN, how are more people going to use a system that doesn’t accommodate more people????

    I’ve clearly show that as COTA EXPANDS it’s system, MORE people ride it.

    rus said:Sure. How many people who use it now is a proxy for how many people would actually use public transit.

    This is COMPLETELY illogical. If you live in Dublin and it takes you LONGER

    rus said:You’ve dismissed your own citation about how much interest there is for public transportation, so how do you know there’s public interest?

    Again you seem to not be able to comprehend that survey indicated the percentage of people that wanted alternative trasportation as their ONE wish to attract young people. It was NOT all people in support of public transit.

    rus said:Right now, most people drive. How do you propose to change that?

    That’s the issue. NO ONE HERE is trying to change that. The majority of people will continue to drive cars long after I’m dead. This isn’t about some crusade against cars. It’s about creating efficient and sustainable transportation options in more dense neighborhoods.

    rus said:Just hypothetically, why couldn’t you replace “streetcar” with “buses” in those examples?

    http://www.politifact.com/oregon/statements/2012/apr/03/charlie-hales/do-streetcars-really-beat-out-buses-capacity-rider/

    It comes down to three things, he said: Because “streetcars carry more people than buses. Because you attract more riders who don’t ride transit now. And actually the operating costs are not any greater than the bus.

    There are more issues as well. Streetcar lines do more to spur development along their route due to the fixed nature of the tracks. After large amounts of capital are spent to install them developers/business owners feel more comfortable locating their because they know its not easy to simply more them somewhere else.

    So basically we know streetcars are more efficient, they encourage more development and neighborhood stability AND that more people feel comfortable riding them.

    rus said:Frankly though, think I benefit more by avoiding the short north altogether. Very glad I don’t live down there any more.

    Then why are you even in a converation about a neighborhood that you feel you should avoid?

    #546500
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    InnerCore said:

    Then why are you even in a converation about a neighborhood that you feel you should avoid?

    Your spelling errors and random capitalization are hilarious. ;)

    #546501

    InnerCore
    Participant

    rus said:
    Your spelling errors and random capitalization are hilarious. ;)

    When I type fast I don’t always type whats in my head. I usually try and go back to proof but I’ve got 4 screens and about 5 programs open. So moving back and forth between everything I usually miss a lot of stuff.

    #546502
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    When I type fast I don’t always type whats in my head. I usually try and go back to proof but I’ve got 4 screens and about 5 programs open. So moving back and forth between everything I usually miss a lot of stuff.

    Eh, just kidding anyway. Easy shot ;)

    Seriously, I occasionally get dragged down there. Much less so over the years, but still.

    #546503

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Graybeak said:
    Awesome. OK! People want high speed trains, people want light rail, people want skittles falling from the sky.
    But, until these become reality, we still have a problem with parking.

    From what I understand, it takes much less time and money to build a parking garage, regardless of the profitability, than to build a fully functional rail transit system.
    Once the system is built, you could turn the parking garage into a train station, perhaps with a giant CoGo station in it to help folks get where they want to go once they arrive by train.

    As for the city paying to build a parking garage, I believe the garage on 4th St, between Gay and Long was built by, and owned by the city.
    CU Story – City Set to Build Two Downtown Parking Garages

    Here I see a story about the county expanding a parking garage.
    CU – Vine Street Parking Garage Expansion.

    I guess what I am ultimately saying is, you don’t have to focus all your resources to one ultimate dream ending. You do what you can to get by until your perfect situation is achieved.

    I think the issue is that rail is what makes sense as a long term sustainable option. But the opponents want to continue to spend PUBLIC money on non sustainable parking. Basically here is the argument.

    “We don’t have money to spend to expand public transit.” OK, fine but we have a serious congestion problem. “Let’s spend public money on parking garages”. Ok fine, let’s build a public garage. Then after a year passes you still can’t build a more sustainable transit options because not only do you have the same excuse that you don’t have the money but on top of that you just spend millions on a public garage that didn’t help much. So you’re basically digging yourself deeper and deeper into a hole.

    A rail line could easily be built in 3 years. A parking garage depending on the size could be done in 1 year. We have a deficiency of over over 3,000 spaces. Clearly we’re not going to build 3,000 spaces anytime soon. So let’s say we build a publicly financed 300 unit garage. Heck let’s do it right and build a mixed use garage with retail on the ground floor. So basically we will have spend $6M of public money. But SN is continually growing. So in the year that it takes to build those 300 parking spaces the demand has gone up and now you need 300 more spaces. So then next year you start building another 300 spaces, and again the same thing happens.

    So basically we could continue to build garages for the next 5 years and we would even help the problem. In fact it would make the problem worse because now land values would be even higher because now you would have even less land available because you use up so much space on the garages.

    In that scenario we would have wasted a lot more money than had we simply built a more sustainable public transit option from square one.

    #546504

    MRipley
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    Then why are you even in a converation about a neighborhood that you feel you should avoid?

    So if by your statement only people that visit the short north are to be included in the conversation, let those same people fund your desire for additional transit options.

    #546505

    DavidF
    Participant

    MRipley said:
    So if by your statement only people that visit the short north are to be included in the conversation, let those same people fund your desire for additional transit options.

    Not sure where you see that statement. Could you reference it for me please?

    #546506

    Graybeak
    Participant

    Meanwhile, we do neither, and people just argue back and forth on the interwebs.

    #546507

    MRipley
    Participant

    DavidF said:
    Not sure where you see that statement. Could you reference it for me please?

    Really? look a little more closely.

    #546508
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    MRipley said:
    Really? look a little more closely.

    Yeah, right here:

    Bustling Urban Neighborhoods Create Parking Tension

    I like the idea of funding some new rail initiative by taxing residents and businesses ( who will pass on their costs to visitors, no doubt ) of the service area, jacking up costs for parking permits and the like.

    Of course, I’d like to also see if the concept is really viable first before committing the metric crapton of money and inconvenience a rail project entails. Test the idea with a dedicated bus route. If it’s used by, say, only 5% of visitors and there’s no improvement in parking or traffic after a year or so then the idea can be scrapped without having wasted too much money.

    #546509

    DavidF
    Participant

    rus said:
    Yeah, right here:

    Bustling Urban Neighborhoods Create Parking Tension

    Nope. Don’t see any such statement.

Viewing 15 posts - 121 through 135 (of 212 total)

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