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Bustling Urban Neighborhoods Create Parking Tension

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Bustling Urban Neighborhoods Create Parking Tension

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 212 total)
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  • #546510
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    DavidF said:

    Nope. Don’t see any such statement.

    Why do you care? You weren’t involved in that. ;)

    #546511

    InnerCore
    Participant

    rus said:

    I like the idea of funding some new rail initiative by taxing residents and businesses ( who will pass on their costs to visitors, no doubt ) of the service area, jacking up costs for parking permits and the like.

    That was the plan, Mayor Coleman’s plan for the streetcar raised 80% of the money by taxing the surround area:

    Coleman’s plan assumes $6.9 million would need to be raised each year for 25 years to cover the $103 million price tag, plus interest. The system is expected to cost $4.5 million a year to operate, which brings the total needed to $11.4 million a year.

    Fees paid by institutions and visitors in the area served by the streetcar would cover $10.5 million, or 80 percent, of the cost.
    • Ohio State contribution: $500,000
    • 4 percent surcharge on off-street parking: $1.1 million
    • 4 percent surcharge on paid admissions: $3.8 million
    • Fares (average $1 per ride): $700,000
    • Rate increase on parking meters: $800,000
    • Existing parking meter revenue: $3.6 million
    Another 20 percent, or $2.2 million, would come from sources outside the streetcar zone.
    • Federal grants through the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission: $2 million
    • Advertising and naming rights: $100,000
    • Other federal funds: $100,000

    rus said:Of course, I’d like to also see if the concept is really viable first before committing the metric crapton of money and inconvenience a rail project entails. Test the idea with a dedicated bus route. If it’s used by, say, only 5% of visitors and there’s no improvement in parking or traffic after a year or so then the idea can be scrapped without having wasted too much money.

    I also advocated for this on this. I titled a thread that had Rubber Tire Trolley in it I believe. It’s something we’re doing in Miami. Basically we set up buses that look like trolleys and run them on a dedicated loop. One of the big issue with buses is that currently they are predominantly used by lower income folks who use them due to necessity. However the wave of people coming back to the cities usually can afford to not use public transit but may have a desire. So you end up with a bus filled with lower income folks coming downtown for a service job, or going to the courthouse, etc. So if you have two early twenty something women looking to head up the street to grab drinks wearing short skirts and heels, they don’t necessarily feel comfortable riding the bus.

    So by creating the trolley route that only circulates downtown the only people who get on it are office workers, people who live and work downtown and people going to and from entertainment options. And because it’s more approachable because you cant get lost you get more tourist who ride as well. Then as ridership of all groups increases its easier to integrate them as there are enough people from all groups that everyone feels comfortable.

    At the very minimum I’d run it to Columbus Commons where you have a huge supply of extra parking. You could probably make it free and use the extra income from people parking in the existing garage to help pay for it. Columbus Commons, Gay st, Arena District, campus and SN would all be easily connected. Since were not talking about a long distance you should be able to have buses pass any point easily with 5 – 10 minutes. Not only do you help your parking problem, but you use the demand from the SN to help prop up other parts of downtown.

    #546512

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    We had one of those already. It didn’t generate any economic development.

    #546513
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Hold up, innercore.

    Are we agreeing on some points?

    #546514

    DavidF
    Participant

    rus said:
    Why do you care? You weren’t involved in that. ;)

    You of all people have to ask? I wanted to know if that was a statement, or another one of those inferences that you and your ilk like to throw at people. (yes, I used the word ilk, whatcha gonna do about it?) :0

    #546515
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    DavidF said:
    You of all people have to ask? I wanted to know if that was a statement, or another one of those inferences that you and your ilk like to throw at people. (yes, I used the word ilk, whatcha gonna do about it?) :0

    ——> Joke ——>

    You

    ( hint: go read the section you’re disputing again )

    #546516

    InnerCore
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    We had one of those already. It didn’t generate any economic development.

    The issue isn’t about just spurring economic development. As I pointed out earlier, light rail is better at that due to the fixed nature of the tracks. For example, let’s say you own an empty lot on High downtown. If they install permanent tracks right in front of your lot then you are going to have more incentive than if they run a bus in front of your lot that could move anytime in the future.

    But right now we have a parking problem in the SN. So while running a bus between SN and Columbus Commons isn’t going to help your empty lot much it is going to help the parking problem while also allowing people to easily move from one shop to the next. So in my previous example let’s take someone who’s at Sushi Rock and want to go to Brother Drakes. With a shuttle essentially runing every 5 – 10 minutes that’s an easy trip. You don’t have first figure out does the #1, #2, or #51 get me there. You just walk outside and hop on the next brightly colored bus that looks like a trolley. And on your way back you do the exact same thing.

    So without outlaying a serious amount of capital you get a system in place that starts to help while providing rus some comfort that people will actually use it. When it gains enough riders to prove itself, you invest in the rail system that does help generate economic development.

    #546517

    InnerCore
    Participant

    rus said:
    Hold up, innercore.

    Are we agreeing on some points?

    Yeah, I’d like to think that its my magnanimous personality but what I find is that usually most people are actually more for things like public transit once they become more informed about the subject.

    Not to mix subjects but honestly I have been doing serious thought about switching positions on the gun debate after the Zimmerman verdict and considering I live in Florida. I filled out paperwork for my carry and conceal permit today.

    #546518
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    Yeah, I’d like to think that its my magnanimous personality but what I find is that usually most people are actually more for things like public transit once they become more informed about the subject.

    Not to mix subjects but honestly I have been doing serious thought about switching positions on the gun debate after the Zimmerman verdict and considering I live in Florida. I filled out paperwork for my carry and conceal permit today.

    I’m still skeptical, but there is a possibility it could free up some parking during gallery hop. If there is a measurable reduction in parking problems and the area is paying for it on it’s own then there’s not much to rally against.

    On the second subject, good on ya. Be happy to discuss that in a different venue; PM me if you like.

    #546519

    MRipley
    Participant

    rus said:
    ——> Joke ——>

    You

    ( hint: go read the section you’re disputing again )

    Now you’re asking for way to much effort and comprehension from this dude.

    #546520

    DavidF
    Participant

    MRipley said:
    Now you’re asking for way to much effort and comprehension from this dude.

    Yes. I’m a dense moron.

    Oh, and your mom was right, everyone is jealous of you.

    Now let the grown ups talk.

    #546521

    DavidF
    Participant

    rus said:
    I’m still skeptical, but there is a possibility it could free up some parking during gallery hop. If there is a measurable reduction in parking problems and the area is paying for it on it’s own then there’s not much to rally against.

    On the second subject, good on ya. Be happy to discuss that in a different venue; PM me if you like.

    I honestly think setting up a shuttle service would help the issue in the short term. If there was a way to more efficiently use some of the underutilized parking in the downtown / Convention center / Arena areas during the weekends, I think it could be helpful. Make it free and frequent and convenient for the surburbanites who are intimidated by parking in the Short North and I think everyone comes out ahead. (of course this is ultimately one of the things a street car would be helpful for).

    Maybe a pilot program jointly sponsored by the SNA and the City?

    When I went to OSU, I parked on West Campus and took that shuttle all the time. Generally, I was at my class faster than people who were looking for spaces on the main campus.
    1. More spaces open up for Short North residents.
    2. Fewer people are put off by trying to find spaces to park.
    3. Local businesses see a bump in people traffic without a bump in vehicle traffic.

    #546522

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    rus said:
    So, how would you convince people coming to the short north to leave their cars at home in dublin, hilliard, or wherever?

    In 1993, 8 rail lines were proposed for Columbus from Downtown to suburban areas, including Hilliard and Dublin. Republicans killed it, particularly Kasich. How about bringing such proposals back? Again, this won’t replace all car travel, obviously, but it would provide people with more options besides trying to build as many garages as possible in a neighborhood that has very little room for that kind of infrastructure.

    #546523

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Graybeak said:
    Meanwhile, we do neither, and people just argue back and forth on the interwebs.

    Let’s say the city goes with your garage idea… where do you think they should go, exactly? The SN is rapidly running out of empty lots. You could probably scatter a few around, but how many floors should they be? 3-5 stories in a few garages isn’t going to cut it in the long run, so when all the lots are filled, what then? Tear down buildings?

    #546524
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    DavidF said:
    Yes. I’m a dense moron.

    Oh, and your mom was right, everyone is jealous of you.

    Now let the grown ups talk.

    I realize others let you cheat because you’re part of the home team, but that’s bad form.

    To explain the joke for you:
    Asking why you care is just as dismissive of your concerns as asking why I’d care about transit options is.

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 212 total)

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