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Building Collapse in OTE

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Building Collapse in OTE

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 36 total)
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  • #1072670
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I’m no structural engineer, but Uhh no shit removing the floors weakened a brick building.

    I hope they actually do finish rehabbing the building, but hopefully in a way that won’t destroy the rest of it.

    Response via Krista Sparks (one of the owners who just purchased the building a few months ago):

    “When we purchased the building, there were no first or second floors. All of the floor joists had rotted through the years and collapsed into the basement. We did not remove these floors. What we removed was debris and the stockpiled belongings and junk of the previous owner that was all piled in the basement.”

    #1072673

    RellekOTE
    Participant

    Unfortunately, the owners just announced on Facebook that the entire building will need to come down today. Sad to hear this, as I live around the corner and was very excited for this project to come to fruition. The owners have done so much for this neighborhood… I am sad that this vision will not be. But perhaps something else could be developed in its place…?

    #1072687
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>King Gambrinus wrote:</div>
    I’m no structural engineer, but Uhh no shit removing the floors weakened a brick building.

    I hope they actually do finish rehabbing the building, but hopefully in a way that won’t destroy the rest of it.

    Response via Krista Sparks (one of the owners who just purchased the building a few months ago):

    “When we purchased the building, there were no first or second floors. All of the floor joists had rotted through the years and collapsed into the basement. We did not remove these floors. What we removed was debris and the stockpiled belongings and junk of the previous owner that was all piled in the basement.”

    Well that makes a lot more sense, but they’re braver than I would be for even walking into a building that was that far gone. Especially, without some external bracing or some other form of support.

    Hopefully they’re still able to make something happen here. I wish them the best of luck.

    #1072695

    dculberson
    Participant

    It really is a shame, sorry to see it go and hopefully the owners aren’t beaten up financially from it.

    #1072699
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Historic Olde Towne East Building to Be Demolished After Wall Collapse
    April 21, 2015 11:41 am – Walker Evans

    On Sunday evening, a wall collapsed on the side of a two story building located at 1112 Oak Street in Olde Towne East. The building has sat vacant and neglected by its former owner for several decades, but had been recently purchased by a new owner just a few months ago who had plans to restore the property for new retail and residential use. The new owners informed us on Sunday that they thought that the building could be repaired, but today announced that the structural integrity of the building won’t allow for that.

    READ MORE: http://www.columbusunderground.com/historic-olde-towne-east-building-to-be-demolished-after-wall-collapse

    #1072700
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    We live across the street. I wish Krista, Brad, and everyone else involved the best. I hope insurance is sufficient. I am interested in finding out how they will adapt their plans to deal with this unfortunate development.

    #1072715

    OneBagTravel
    Participant

    Bummer. Here’s to building something similar in style.

    #1072732
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    We live across the street. I wish Krista, Brad, and everyone else involved the best. I hope insurance is sufficient. I am interested in finding out how they will adapt their plans to deal with this unfortunate development.

    Hopefully they’ll have the road open again soon, at least.

    I also hope their insurance will cover costs.

    #1072764

    Matthew
    Participant

    Has anyone else seen the Google map satellite view from above? There was a huge hole in the roof!

    #1072798
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Has anyone else seen the Google map satellite view from above? There was a huge hole in the roof!

    Huh. No kidding.

    #1072884

    goldenidea
    Participant

    In case anyone has interest, here are some key personal observations on our historic masonry (brick) buildings: exterior walls consist to two layers of brick, an outer & an inner layer. The outer layer bricks are usually more ornate; they are harder (they were kilned at hotter temps), more durable, less porous and therefore more weather resistant. This outer brick layer serves as the building’s “shell”. The inner bricks are softer and less weather resistant. Most people/building owners rarely see the inner bricks as they are covered by plaster on the inside and covered by the outer brick layer outside. The inner bricks serve as an important element of the building’s structure. They bear much of the vertical load, supporting the interior framing of the building: the floor joists & roof rafters.

    This inner brick layer or course is vulnerable to weathering and degradation when exposed to the elements, which normally does not happen. They shouldn’t be allowed to get wet, and if the building is heated over winters, will normally not freeze. But when exposed to rainfall/snowfall/wetting coupled with many winter seasons of freezing/thawing, especially in a vacant, unheated building, the inner brick layer can be damaged.

    Roof leaks, broken/missing windows, bad gutters & downspouts, and bad exterior mortar joints allow water to enter and wet the inner bricks and many cycles of freezing/thawing work on the inner layer to gradually disintegrate bricks that get wet from such “leaks”. Once a enough of the inner layer disintegrates, things go downhill, even though the exterior bricks may still look fine. This was probably the first big step toward how/why the wall in this building failed.

    #1073049
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    Gone

    Attachments:
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    #1073075
    Josh Miller
    Josh Miller
    Participant

    …Roof leaks, broken/missing windows, bad gutters & downspouts, and bad exterior mortar joints allow water to enter and wet the inner bricks and many cycles of freezing/thawing work on the inner layer to gradually disintegrate bricks that get wet from such “leaks”. Once a enough of the inner layer disintegrates, things go downhill, even though the exterior bricks may still look fine. This was probably the first big step toward how/why the wall in this building failed.

    I’m not trying to sound unsympathetic but I can’t help to wonder how the building, with the visible hole in the roof on google maps, ever was allowed to change hands in the first place. Isn’t there some sort of inspection/inspector that would have immediately discovered the condition of the building or was this some sort of cash sale? I’m not too well-read on commercial property transactions either fwiw.

    #1073077
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    Footage of the destruction.

    #1073081

    wpcc88
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>goldenidea wrote:</div>
    …Roof leaks, broken/missing windows, bad gutters & downspouts, and bad exterior mortar joints allow water to enter and wet the inner bricks and many cycles of freezing/thawing work on the inner layer to gradually disintegrate bricks that get wet from such “leaks”. Once a enough of the inner layer disintegrates, things go downhill, even though the exterior bricks may still look fine. This was probably the first big step toward how/why the wall in this building failed.

    I’m not trying to sound unsympathetic but I can’t help to wonder how the building, with the visible hole in the roof on google maps, ever was allowed to change hands in the first place. Isn’t there some sort of inspection/inspector that would have immediately discovered the condition of the building or was this some sort of cash sale? I’m not too well-read on commercial property transactions either fwiw.

    My question would be about the same and alsi I wonder if they even consulted an engineer before doing any interior demo work.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 36 total)

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