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Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 145 total)
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  • #1101929
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    While you’re waiting on the press release…

    Drive slower. Be careful. Pay attention to signs and to your surroundings.

    Shouldn’t be a big deal.

    #1101997

    Stephen Hardwick
    Participant

    The biggest issue I have seen just in the last 3 days has been vehicles using the bike lanes as a parking spot, a turn lane, and even a passing lane. . . .

    Actually, motorists are supposed to merge into bike lanes before turning past them. That’s city code, and it makes it safer for everyone. It’s insanely dangerous to permit any kind of traffic to turn through a straight-through lane.

    #1102015

    dwinks
    Participant

    These bikes lanes seem like a great improvement, provided they clean them basically daily. The housing between Hudson and Chittenden along both 4th and Summit is heavily college students, and even though these people are attending an educational program they don’t seem be smart enough to not break glass bottles in the street constantly for ‘fun’. Before the bike lanes, I’d simply treat the right hand lane of Summit as a bike lane, biking smack dab in the center of the lane, forcing cars to entirely change lanes to pass. In 3 years I’ve had I think 2 altercations with overly-aggressive motorists. The benefit of riding in the motor vehicle lane is all the broken glass gets ground down pretty rapidly, so flats are rare. The downside is the occasional motorist who’s so lazy that turning their power-steering wheel a few degrees to the left is nothing short of a Herculean task. I just don’t understand how changing lanes into one of the other two open lanes is such a big deal to some people.

    I ride Schwalbe Big Apple tires, inflated to a cushy and fast 22-26PSI, so there’s really not enough pressure in my tires to get flats for the most part, but I’ve had a sliver of glass slowly work its way in earlier this year. With as much glass as I’ve seen so far in the Summit St bike lanes, that’ll become a much more common occurrence if they aren’t sweeping these at least once a week, preferably twice a week. Right now, I wouldn’t dare ride a bike down the Summit lane if I were riding narrow, high pressure tires. It’d be a flat for sure. There’s a few patches near 17th right now that are more glass than pavement.

    Also, I hope the city maintains a very strict enforcement of keeping cars out of these lanes. I get that they’re not 100% finished by now, but anyone with even half a brain should be able to realize that the lanes on Summit aren’t for cars. On 4th, it’s not quite so clear since there’s almost no paint up yet. It’s not exactly hard to figure out for Summit tho. That said, I’ve seen a few dozen people parked there, treating it like a loading zone, driving down them, etc, so far…including Columbus Police (twice), parking in the bike lanes. I don’t see the police’s rationale behind blocking two lanes of bike traffic (which is all of them), forcing the most vulnerable road users into motor vehicle traffic rather than blocking one lane of motor traffic out of two, leaving plenty of space for motorists to drive by in the other lane.

    Hopefully CPD does a better job keeping their cars in the car lanes than NYC cops do, but I don’t have high hopes. I pretty much fully expect the bike lanes on Summit to end up being filled with glass and trash and parked cars and cop cruisers. I definitely expect them filled with parked cars on game days. And I especially doubt the food delivery drivers won’t be parking in the bike lane…especially since they have zero concern about double-parking with their “I’ll park wherever the hell I feel like” blinkers on already.

    #1102151

    mrsgeedeck
    Participant

    So far the biggest issue I’ve seen are cars not realizing there is now a left hand turn lane on fifth. I’ve been cut off so many times by people not noticing it until the last minute.

    #1103275
    Posole
    Posole
    Participant

    This might be a dumb question, but how do they pick up trash cans along the protected bike lanes? Does the garbage truck just drive down the bike path between the parked cars and the curb?

    #1105297

    pkovacs
    Participant

    Press event on Thursday 12/3 @ 3pm @ Summit & 17th!

    #1105324

    wpcc88
    Participant

    This might be a dumb question, but how do they pick up trash cans along the protected bike lanes? Does the garbage truck just drive down the bike path between the parked cars and the curb?

    Most places on Summit have alley trash cans, so collection shouldn’t be affected.

    #1105344

    goldenidea
    Participant

    One detrimental impact of these new bike lanes that I’ve noticed, at least along N4th St during rush hour: Because there are now just two lanes, cars back up bumper-to-bumper along much or all of the distance between E2nd Ave and E5th Ave. This makes it pretty much impossible to cross N4th street driving either east or west on any of the cross streets along that segment of 4th. There is never a break in the northbound 4th St. traffic. The only way to dependably cross now is at the light at 2nd. That’s going to make 2nd more heavily backed up. I realize prior to the new lanes that traffic also backed up along 4th, but not as much as it does now. You used to be able to use the cross streets.

    For over 4 years, I used to bike commute from the southern part of the Short North to an 8-5 office job on Morse Rd riding up N4th every day in the AM, returning along Summit in the PM. Recognizing that I was not riding WITH the heaviest direction of rush hour traffic, I found both 4th & Summit to be pretty manageable to ride along as they were. The riding lanes or margins stayed clean too. There were wider than normal margins along both sides of each street and plenty of room to avoid the traffic driving up along side of me. For streets with heavy traffic, I found Summit & 4th to be the among easiest to ride on.

    I haven’t tried the new bike lanes yet so I could be mistaken, but based on visual observation while driving my car, I wonder if things weren’t better the old way. Also, because motorists are not used to this new layout, it seems like cyclists are forced to expose themselves to a lot more uncertainty by riding in a bike lane that’s kind of out in the area where cars used to be. At least until motorists get used to it, that seems more risky to cyclist than the old set up. Maybe over time, this new set up will prove to work better. Maybe the heavier traffic back ups will divert traffic to other arteries, lessening traffic on Summit & 4th. I applaud all efforts to make improvements for cyclists.

    #1105352
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    One detrimental impact of these new bike lanes that I’ve noticed, at least along N4th St during rush hour: Because there are now just two lanes, cars back up bumper-to-bumper along much or all of the distance between E2nd Ave and E5th Ave. This makes it pretty much impossible to cross N4th street driving either east or west on any of the cross streets along that segment of 4th. There is never a break in the northbound 4th St. traffic. The only way to dependably cross now is at the light at 2nd. That’s going to make 2nd more heavily backed up. I realize prior to the new lanes that traffic also backed up along 4th, but not as much as it does now. You used to be able to use the cross streets.

    For over 4 years, I used to bike commute from the southern part of the Short North to an 8-5 office job on Morse Rd riding up N4th every day in the AM, returning along Summit in the PM. Recognizing that I was not riding WITH the heaviest direction of rush hour traffic, I found both 4th & Summit to be pretty manageable to ride along as they were. The riding lanes or margins stayed clean too. There were wider than normal margins along both sides of each street and plenty of room to avoid the traffic driving up along side of me. For streets with heavy traffic, I found Summit & 4th to be the among easiest to ride on.

    I haven’t tried the new bike lanes yet so I could be mistaken, but based on visual observation while driving my car, I wonder if things weren’t better the old way. Also, because motorists are not used to this new layout, it seems like cyclists are forced to expose themselves to a lot more uncertainty by riding in a bike lane that’s kind of out in the area where cars used to be. At least until motorists get used to it, that seems more risky to cyclist than the old set up. Maybe over time, this new set up will prove to work better. Maybe the heavier traffic back ups will divert traffic to other arteries, lessening traffic on Summit & 4th. I applaud all efforts to make improvements for cyclists.

    Lanes were only removed between 11th and Hudson, not to the south.

    #1105414

    goldenidea
    Participant

    Lanes were only removed between 11th and Hudson, not to the south.

    Good point, but the segments of 4th & Summit from I670 to 5th Ave sure seem different than before. Traffic is different too… more backed up.

    Crossing 4th via E-W cross streets (e.g. 3rd Ave, Detroit, etc.) probably isn’t impacting many people now, but when Budd Dairy and other developments east of 4th come on line, it will inconvenience a lot more people.

    But I’m probably stuck in the past and just need to get used to the new lane lines.

    #1105468

    JakeNic
    Participant

    Totally agree with “goldenidea”. I’m a big fan of making Columbus more bike-friendly and I understand what they were going for with adding a bike lanes to 4th and Summit, but so far, I’m dubious. I drive 4th from downtown to Hudson every day and consider myself to be a good and courteous driver. And yet, I look at the new markings and am not sure how I would properly navigate them. Before, I would’ve simply checked to make sure I wasn’t cutting off a biker before turning left onto one of the streets in the affected area.

    The back-ups now that we’re down to 2 lanes are extremely frustrating. 4th often gets congested enough at rush hour, but now with one less lane, it’s awful. All that backed up traffic only serves to make drivers more anxious, which then puts bikers at even greater risk. How is this better?

    ALSO, I totally understand that bikes have the right to use whatever lane they want, but please, can someone explain to me why just yesterday on my drive home, there was a person on a bike in one of those remaining two lanes?? Here you have a perfectly good and unused bike lane, which resulted in one less lane for cars, and yet, you bike in a car lane, reducing the number of lanes to ONE?? Why?? C’mon…. that just doesn’t seem fair to those of us who have to drive.

    #1105470

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    If traffic makes drivers anxious, they should find another mode of travel.

    If you “totally understand that bikes have the right to use whatever lane they want,” then you’ve answered your question. The cyclist who was in the roadway was exercising the right that you acknowledge. During rush hour, a cyclist would be foolish, IMO, to use the roadway lane rather than the protected bike lane north of 11th Avenue due to the likely slower travel speed in the roadway. The bike lane would be a much faster option. And a cyclist in one of the lanes doesn’t “result in one less lane for cars,” as you’ve alleged. Just like other slow moving vehicles, parked vehicles, turning vehicles, etc., the cars have to go around that cyclist. This doesn’t mean the same thing as reducing the lanes from two down to one.

    If a cyclist using a lane they have a right to doesn’t seem “fair to those of us who have to drive,” then I suggest you consider how fair the built environment around Central Ohio is to those who choose not to or cannot drive.

    #1105479

    ImNotaStar
    Participant

    Yea, these lanes are useless. They increase traffic dramatically and I have yet to see anyone using them. This city is backwards, give drivers another options first (like a subway) then you can clog the streets with bikes, and tell the drivers if they dont like it to take another mode of transportation. Unfortunately, the Coleman administration was like this a lot, hurry up and implement a project to appease special interests without first thinking the plan through. This is the same thing when he gave tax abatements for downtown condos, good idea, but a hurried / flawed implementation.

    #1105480

    ohbr
    Participant

    Yea, these lanes are useless. They increase traffic dramatically and I have yet to see anyone using them.

    I guess that erases all the people I’ve seen using them. There we go, no one uses them.

    This city is backwards, give drivers another options first (like a subway)

    Or buses…. and they did give them another option. Bikes.

    It’s only 2 streets in this vast city. Perhaps we ought to give it more than a couple weeks before declaring it a massive failure. and IMHO, I don’t care if we have to sit in more traffic. Simply don’t care. We all have to sit in traffic at some point if we commute anywhere during peak times. Boo-hoo if your trip on Summit or 4th gets added to the list of roads that experiences more regular traffic congestion. You live and work in a city. And I say this as a person who regularly commutes these roads.

    Sorry, I was feeling a bit bitter this evening. Really tired of the complaining by those in the community looking for reasons to get rid of them before they’re even completed. “Count up all the accidents you see and report them to the city to prove we were right that this will cause accidents”… never mind you didn’t keep track prior for a before and after comparison… some of the vitriol for these bike lanes has gotten pretty old pretty quick.

    #1105481

    ImNotaStar
    Participant

    We live and work in a city with no suitable form of transportation besides a road. How does a bus move you from a congested road, oh yea it doesn’t. These are useless, plus I barely even see the bikers like i did 4 years ago, its a fad that is finally dying. Played out like kwame and them polka dots.

    I work out at Polaris though so this never affects me, I just feel for the drivers, and the bicyclists actually because this will not end well for them. Horrible implementation.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 145 total)

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