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Average Gas Mileage Regulations Set to 54.5MPG by 2025

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Average Gas Mileage Regulations Set to 54.5MPG by 2025

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 31 total)
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  • #511617

    Graybeak
    Participant

    Seems like a waste of a perfectly good 1959 Chevy Bel Air to me.

    #511618

    tdziemia
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    The average, everyday person will have to admit, though, that they don’t need an off road vehicle for everyday use and that it doesn’t need to be faster than all of the legendary muscle cars of the ’60s either.

    Yep. ‘Xactly my point. Everyone wants to bitch at the pump. Nobody wants to change their behavior.

    I am trying to think of something, anything that has changed so dramatically along these lines, in even 1 generation, and am hard pressed to find an example. Hence the conclusion that it ain’t gonna happen.

    But I am all ears … any other examples where Americans have made these kinds of tradeoffs??? I just see downsizing as kind of un-American. Maybe that’s an opportunity for gen X, or gen Y, or whatever gen we’re up to these days.

    #511619

    gentrify this
    Blocked

    Suburbanites ruin all…….a shame social services offices aren’t in Dublin….those fuckers could learn to walk, huh?

    #511620

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    OK … some facts on the Americans’ appetite for fuel efficient vehicles …

    The first ten years of hybrid availability saw the average price of gas (in current dollars, not inflation adjusted) increase from about $1.30 to about 3.40. As a result, hybrid market share skyrocketed from nada all the way up to 3% (2012 sales data). And not a single one of those hybrid vehicles sold in 2012 meets the CAFE average set for 2025! The vehicles that DO meet that target are electric, and had a market share of 0.4% in 2012.

    There is not a snowball’s chance in hell that the target will be met.

    Don’t think that’s the case. Remember, 54.5 mpg is the unadjusted number, NOT what you see on the window sticker. For CAFE purposes, the Prius gets something like 70 mpg in its current iteration. Yes we will see more hybrids and such, but pickup trucks and big SUVs aren’t going to be banned or anything drastic.

    #511621

    tdziemia
    Participant

    Fair enough … yeah, after reading a bit, it seems like CAFE comes out 30% higher than the window sticker mpg, or thereabouts. Still, that equates to something like REAL fuel economy of 40 mpg or so. My point is that today, only vehicles like the Prius, the Honda Civic and the electrics are hitting 40 mpg, and those vehicles have a national market share in the very low single digits. That number needs to get close to 50%, i.e. Americans need to buy ten times as many truly fuel efficient vehicles to hit the target. Higher gas prices haven’t been sufficient iincentive on the demand side. I wonder if EPA fines will really be an incentive from the supply side. Guess it depends on how steep they would be.

    #511622

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    There will always be a need for pickups and vans as work trucks. But I await the day when people quit buying SUVs that are neither sporty nor utilitarian. I watch people trying to load large items that my wagon could easily swallow.

    I curse when one of those goddam blind spots parks next to me, even when I park way off in the margins of a lot. I struggle to see around them in traffic. How many accidents are caused by those things blocking a driver’s view? For example, how many people attempt a left turn because they can’t see any oncoming traffic, because one of those mobile blind spots is facing them across the intersection, blocking their view of oncoming traffic? Pow! and the SUV drives away, “not involved” in the incident.

    #511623

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    No stats kept for that or for near misses that would have been crashes if the vehicles involved were larger.

    #511624

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    alexs said:
    For example, how many people attempt a left turn because they can’t see any oncoming traffic, because one of those mobile blind spots is facing them across the intersection, blocking their view of oncoming traffic? Pow! and the SUV drives away, “not involved” in the incident.

    Really? Maybe if their view is blocked they should consider waiting until they know for sure that there is no oncoming traffic. Or they could just blindly go for it and blame the taller uninvolved vehicle if they cause a crash.

    Of course the other side of the coin asks how many crashes are avoided because of the better visibility afforded the driver of a large SUV/truck? The driver can see further & over cars & objects when they sit higher. The higher brake lights could also help following drivers realize that traffic is slowing/stopping earlier.

    #511625

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    That sky high visibility is highly overrated. Not only can people in lower vehicles look up, but a tall vehicle loses visibility on the lower planes and it why people kept running over their own kids before the backup cameras got popular. Brake lights up way up high are outside of a lower vehicle’s natural line of sight. That’s why there are regulations about how high semi trailers’ lights can be and why people rear-end trucks/SUVs more often than cars. It’s best to have brake lights both high and low — which is why the third brake light regulation on cars exists.

    It doesn’t really hurt anything when a small group of dedicated enthusiasts knowledgeable of the changes they made to their vehicles drive taller ones. Or when highly trained professional drivers do. It’s when the average non-enthusiast finds themselves piloting an unwieldy vehicle just because it’s what everyone else is doing or the downsides weren’t pointed out to them by the carmakers.

    #511626

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    The higher brake lights could also help following drivers realize that traffic is slowing/stopping earlier.

    So I can’t see around the truck to know what’s ahead of it, and the only indication I have of anything is if and when the truck driver hits the brakes? No thanks. Maybe this sounds strange to you, but I want to see the road I’m attempting to travel, and I resent being robbed of that view by somebody’s playtoy SUV.

    The point is to be able to anticipate things before they happen, not when the SUV driver responds to something already happening. Other drivers appear to be content to back out of parking spaces or make left turns completely blind, and that’s their call, but it becomes my business when I’m the one just rolling along with the right of way.

    For example, I witnessed this in Linworth, southbound. Traffic was stopped waiting for the light at 161, and someone left a gap at the alley for a little Toyota to make a left turn and go north. There was a minivan blocking its view, it darted out anyway, and tore the rear bumper off of a northbound taxi that was doing nothing wrong. That instantly spun the taxi into the line of waiting cars, tearing off the front bumper. I could have been that guy, or the guy sitting in line that he hit. Thanks for the blind spot.

    As for the commanding view argument, save it. You’ll just get stuck behind another SUV and you can admire their tailgate like everyone else.

    #511627
    Chris Sherman
    Chris Sherman
    Participant

    alexs said:

    The 2014 models will also protect you in a multitude of different crash types from significant injury that would have been fatal in a truck from the 80’s (or even 90’s).

    Speaking of which, did you see this one?

    Makes me feel really good about my 65 tbird…

    #511628

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    IIRC 1965 was the first year for standards regarding the integrity of the passenger compartment in collisions. The older cars can bend and fold in strange ways.

    #511629

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    alexs said:

    The higher brake lights could also help following drivers realize that traffic is slowing/stopping earlier.

    So I can’t see around the truck to know what’s ahead of it, and the only indication I have of anything is if and when the truck driver hits the brakes? No thanks. Maybe this sounds strange to you, but I want to see the road I’m attempting to travel, and I resent being robbed of that view by somebody’s playtoy SUV.

    The point is to be able to anticipate things before they happen, not when the SUV driver responds to something already happening. Other drivers appear to be content to back out of parking spaces or make left turns completely blind, and that’s their call, but it becomes my business when I’m the one just rolling along with the right of way.

    For example, I witnessed this in Linworth, southbound. Traffic was stopped waiting for the light at 161, and someone left a gap at the alley for a little Toyota to make a left turn and go north. There was a minivan blocking its view, it darted out anyway, and tore the rear bumper off of a northbound taxi that was doing nothing wrong. That instantly spun the taxi into the line of waiting cars, tearing off the front bumper. I could have been that guy, or the guy sitting in line that he hit. Thanks for the blind spot.

    As for the commanding view argument, save it. You’ll just get stuck behind another SUV and you can admire their tailgate like everyone else.

    LOL, another reference of someone pulling out when they can’t see. Great example of intelligence while driving.

    So I guess we all should dump our SUVs, trucks and Subarus and buy Miatas because there are apparent dumbass drivers out there (impatient) that “go anyway” even when they can’t see around another vehicle.

    I venture that people could debate the advantages/disadvantages of their particular choice of vehicle all day. I’m looking from a perspective of a driver that prefers to sit up higher in traffic to see better and further ahead, and you’re looking at it from a perspective of a driver that prefers a lower car with poorer visibility. Sorry that your choice prevents better visibility down road, but fact is, it is your choice.

    #511630

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I’m in an untinted Outback, I sit plenty high enough and people can see through the car if I park next to them. I’d have to be standing on the roof to see over an SUV, so I try to see around them.

    I haven’t measured my MPG recently but it’s normally around 30, depending on how hard I push it.

    #511631

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    JeepGirl said:
    I’m looking from a perspective of a driver that prefers to sit up higher in traffic to see better and further ahead, and you’re looking at it from a perspective of a driver that prefers a lower car with poorer visibility. Sorry that your choice prevents better visibility down road, but fact is, it is your choice.

    Stop acting like you are the last word on a subject. You trade visibility up high for visibility down low. You haven’t selected something “better” — only something different.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 31 total)

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