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Average electricity bill for 2bdrm ~900 sq. ft. apartment?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Q&A Average electricity bill for 2bdrm ~900 sq. ft. apartment?

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  • #528229

    James
    Participant

    if it’s all electric and not a heat pump, you’re basically heating your house with electric resistance. That’s the most expensive way to heat. If your not

    ches08 said:
    I just called it a furnace I guess, there is no gas run to the house at all, it’s completely electric.

    Also, I’ve been told that I do not have a heat pump..

    If you don’t have a heat pump and you heat with electricity then it sounds like you have electric resistance heat. It doesn’t matter if its top of the line or old and rickety – they all operate at 100% efficiency because you basically run electricity across wires to heat them up and blow air across the wires to move the heat. Nothing wears out but they are very expensive to operate.

    Your payback on a gas furnace / electric AC would probably be pretty short. You might also look at what’s called a mini-split electric heat pump. I’d investigate a replacement of the furnace before much else.

    #528230

    ches08
    Participant

    James said:
    if it’s all electric and not a heat pump, you’re basically heating your house with electric resistance. That’s the most expensive way to heat. If your not

    If you don’t have a heat pump and you heat with electricity then it sounds like you have electric resistance heat. It doesn’t matter if its top of the line or old and rickety – they all operate at 100% efficiency because you basically run electricity across wires to heat them up and blow air across the wires to move the heat. Nothing wears out but they are very expensive to operate.

    Actually, I started to get curious as to why the bank would pay so much for a new furnace, go the length to get a “top of the line model” but NOT get one with a heat pump.Just seemed stupid to me.
    So I did a little research and found out that we DO have a heat pump. It was just never turning on.
    So I did a little more research and found out that the thermostat that was installed is not compatible for an electric heater with a heat pump AND auxiliary heat. So the thermostat was never capable of turning on the heat pump. Therefor we were just using resistant heat the entire time!
    We got a thermostat that works, and tested the kilowatts being used with and without the heat pump…definitely found our problem.
    Without the heat pump, just resistant heat was registering at 18kwh
    With the heat pump measured at just 2kwh

    #528231

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    ches08 said:
    Actually, I started to get curious as to why the bank would pay so much for a new furnace, go the length to get a “top of the line model” but NOT get one with a heat pump.Just seemed stupid to me.
    So I did a little research and found out that we DO have a heat pump. It was just never turning on.
    So I did a little more research and found out that the thermostat that was installed is not compatible for an electric heater with a heat pump AND auxiliary heat. So the thermostat was never capable of turning on the heat pump. Therefor we were just using resistant heat the entire time!
    We got a thermostat that works, and tested the kilowatts being used with and without the heat pump…definitely found our problem.
    Without the heat pump, just resistant heat was registering at 18kwh
    With the heat pump measured at just 2kwh

    yep. that’ll do it.

    #528232

    Twixlen
    Participant

    Holy crap! That’s a real forehead smacker.

    #528233

    James
    Participant

    ches08 said:
    Actually, I started to get curious as to why the bank would pay so much for a new furnace, go the length to get a “top of the line model” but NOT get one with a heat pump.Just seemed stupid to me.
    So I did a little research and found out that we DO have a heat pump. It was just never turning on.
    So I did a little more research and found out that the thermostat that was installed is not compatible for an electric heater with a heat pump AND auxiliary heat. So the thermostat was never capable of turning on the heat pump. Therefor we were just using resistant heat the entire time!
    We got a thermostat that works, and tested the kilowatts being used with and without the heat pump…definitely found our problem.
    Without the heat pump, just resistant heat was registering at 18kwh
    With the heat pump measured at just 2kwh

    You’ll be MUCH happier when your next electric bill arrives. You should send your last bill to the company that installed the incorrect thermostat.

    #528234

    ches08
    Participant

    While we were trying to figure out what the problem was, we bought one of those devises that tells you how much electric you are using at the current moment and it tallies it by the day.

    According to our last bill, pre heat pump, we were using 131kw a day
    Yesterday after we got everything fixed, we were at 24kw a day.

    Actually really excited to get our next bill now to see the difference. :-)

    #528235

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    ches08 said:
    While we were trying to figure out what the problem was, we bought one of those devises that tells you how much electric you are using at the current moment and it tallies it by the day.

    According to our last bill, pre heat pump, we were using 131kw a day
    Yesterday after we got everything fixed, we were at 24kw a day.

    Actually really excited to get our next bill now to see the difference. :-)

    just in time not to need the heat at all! “D’oh!”

    #528236

    ches08
    Participant

    Rockmastermike said:
    just in time not to need the heat at all! “D’oh!”

    I know :-/ Better late than never I guess!
    And we bought the house “as is” from the bank. So we are extremely happy that they put in all these new appliances, just wish we could have gotten some warranty on the work!
    But it’s the chance you take when buying bank owned.
    All in all it’s a small hiccup.

    #528237
    Jared
    Jared
    Participant

    Rockmastermike said:
    …You should get one of the home energy audits where they check for airleaks and everything…

    Has anyone had experience with an energy audit? I’m planning to upgrade and insulate to conserve energy and read that AEP offers a rebate program. Is it worthwhile to have an audit before I insulate?
    https://www.aepohio.com/save/programs/In-homeEnergySavings/In-homeEnergyRebatePrograms.aspx

    #528238
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    I did one through Columbia Gas and it was informative. Took about 4 hours I believe. The technician that did it was personable.

    #528239
    Jared
    Jared
    Participant

    Anne said:
    I did one through Columbia Gas and it was informative. Took about 4 hours I believe. The technician that did it was personable.

    Thanks Anne. I just talked to an auditor and learned that gas-electric homes should use the Columbia audit rebate program because it is more generous; AEP gives preference, i.e. larger rebates, to all-electric homes. My next stop is the Columbia Gas site.

    My inquiry began when I learned that some utilities will rebate the cost of the Nest thermostat. AEP Ohio is not one of them.

    #528240
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    ooh, I’d be interested to know which companies reimburse for that!

    Columbia Gas offered a low flow shower head, but it was not that pretty. They also had themostats, but I don’t remember what. We did it over a year ago.

    #528241
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Also, dont pitch all the solicitations in the mail from the various energy companies. We just switched to Dayton Power and Light from regular AEP and the difference was about 8.45 cents per to 6.29 cents per. Should save us about 20% per bill for electric per month.

    #528242

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    Anne said:
    ooh, I’d be interested to know which companies reimburse for that!

    Columbia Gas offered a low flow shower head, but it was not that pretty. They also had themostats, but I don’t remember what. We did it over a year ago.

    I picked up an Oxygenics low flow shower head last year. I had low expectations but it looked worth trying for $30. It uses a kind of a venturi system to inject air into the water stream and really pushes the water even under low flow. Turn it up all the way and it’s like a sandblaster. Long and short I’ve decided I love it.

    http://www.oxygenics.com/Shower-Heads/Classic-Series-Shower-Heads/SkinCare-Shower-Head.html

    #528243

    Twixlen
    Participant

    I had a neighbor do the Columbia Gas one a couple years ago, and they ended up getting insulation at the roof line, a new window, new programmable thermostat – and with the rebates they got, it ended up being just a couple hundred bucks out of pocket.

    I’ve been wanting to do it, but have the feeling that neither program is going to benefit me that much – I have a heat pump (electric), with a gas furnace back up. I use very little gas, and not much electricity either. But I sure would like some cheap insulation!

    ****

    A few things to watch out for when switching to one of the retail providers:

    – Is there a fee to switch off from them? Most of them have a fairly hefty ($150-200) fee for switching within a certain time.
    – Are you bound to a contract, much like a cell phone contract?
    – Is the rate guaranteed for a period of time, and what happens once that period of time passes?
    – What are the fees/add’l charges added onto the cents/per rate?

    Many of the contract offers that I’ve read offer a flat rate for a period of time, but then you have to re-up at whatever the current rate is, or you automatically fall into a market-based rate. This is really similar to the set up to how the gas deregulation worked. The gas and electric market don’t behave the same way, but they are both prone to pretty significant fluctuation. The folks that switched to retail for gas saved initially, but over time, have paid significantly more (I can’t remember the percentage, just that it was shocking). Most people aren’t babysitters of what’s happening with their utility bills, and when their contracts were up, they were exposed to the market at a time when the market happened to be going crazy.

    Switching isn’t the right answer for everyone.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 60 total)

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