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Are Ohioans Stuck, or Content?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Are Ohioans Stuck, or Content?

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 73 total)
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  • #475898

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    I like it here and I’m not “stuck” at all. I’ve turned down some job offers because I knew those towns would not compare to what I get from living here even for less pay. Cost of living is low and, IMHO, quality of living is quite high.

    #475899

    Pickerington_Kyle
    Participant

    my family moved here in 1994, when DSCC opened up. And, when I left to stay for an extended time somewhere else. It didn’t have the “home feeling”. When I stayed in cites such as San Fransico, Orlando, New York, and Miami. It feel’s like a nice week or month to spend time at. Not for more than two months. Columbus and other Ohio cities just feel like “home” cities.

    #475900

    jmathews5
    Participant

    I have a love-hate relationship with Columbus. I moved away and lived in San Francisco and absolutely fell in love and I’m sure you can guess one of the many reasons why.
    My hate relationship is the fact that I just feel this city likes to talk things to death instead of doing. Our city talks of leadership and edgy and innovation but when change SHOULD happen… we talk. We can’t keep consulting ALL the time. Somethings, its better to ask forgiveness than to ask for permission. I’m just tired of feeling like we’re always playing ‘catch up’ with other diverse, progressive, bigger cities.
    On the flip side, I love this city. It’s affordable, diverse and it has SUCH potential. Being in the world of advocacy, that’s a huge benefit b/c I feel like I have the ability to SEE the change I’ve contributed instead of it already being done and that’s very satisfying.
    I do know I’ll eventually leave again.

    #475901

    cbus11
    Member

    I have lived in several large cities. I love Columbus, but it does seem to suffer from a little bit of an unnecesary ‘small pond’ persona despite its size. I hope that changes as regional/national connectivity becomes even more common. I have seen a large increase in job related travel among my peers in the recent years. It seems like Chicago and NYC are always right around the corner now, but it is nice to come home.

    #475902
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    Reminds me of a poster on a wall in the WCRS studio that reads “Columbus Sucks Because You Suck.” It might be from some local Indy Media project someone was doing a few years ago.

    #475903
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    Had for years the goal of living in a more cosmopolitan, sophisticated, and forward-thinking city, however that’s defined.

    Anymore, don’t have that goal, per se. Though from time to time think, “got to get out of this vanilla, complacent, conformist, unimaginative ‘test-market’ city,” usually respond to my discontent by asking myself how I can get more involved in the community, and how I can do a better job of following my conscience.

    Don’t rule out traveling or moving to other cities, especially when Chinatown Bus goes to NYC for about $40. But generally think my degree of satisfaction is less about where I’m at and more about what I’m doing.

    #475904

    ittzings
    Participant

    “Change is maddeningly slow to take root, because everyone wants things to stay the same as they were when they were children.”

    If Columbus were like it was when I was a child, I might not like it as well. I’ve lived here my whole life, but if I didn’t find this to be an excellent place to live on several levels (including some that are mentioned in the article), I wouldn’t still be here. I love the way that this city is changing for the better, and I don’t consider myself nor Columbus to be “stuck”.

    #475905

    bruinswin
    Member

    leftovers said:
    I think there is a lot to be said about moving a couple of times when you are young. It really does help to broaden experiences a bit, forces one to adapt to changes and remove the ‘I am stuck’ mentality.

    Most of my friends moved to Columbus and the general feeling is that it is fairly ‘easy’ to live/make it here (jobs, cost of living, general expectations).

    Agree 100%. I’m continually surprised with how so many young Ohio people are stuck on this idea that they need to “buy that house before age 28!” Which is often fueled by parents desperate to keep their adult children from leaving, but the desperation is masked by mantras about “making smart financial choices,” etc. So they get the house (which is like their early retirement), and then they spend the next 30 years enslaved to house payments they can’t get out of. And most of them figure out out by their early 30’s that they need to leave Ohio to move up in their careers. But they usually figure out too late, after the house, the unhappy marriage based on their mid-20’s mentality which changes dramatically by 30, 1-3 children, etc.

    #475906

    pez
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    Had for years the goal of living in a more cosmopolitan, sophisticated, and forward-thinking city, however that’s defined.

    Like one where people don’t have to pee in a coffee can and pour it onto a gravel driveway? ;)

    #475907

    geoyui
    Participant

    ChrisSunami said:
    Unlike a place like New York, where the city will always be bigger than any and every given individual or group, in Columbus, one person can have a real and significant impact.

    I completely agree with this as this is one reason that has kept me in Columbus. When I moved here for school I thought immediately following graduation I’d find a way out west to San Fran. That changed as I become more involved with causes I find worthy. Being involved with those causes you could see some immediate changes and positive effects.

    On the flip side, this could be problematic. When you are pushing to make an impact, sometimes you need help. And sometimes the “talent” pool is smaller here in Columbus then say other cities.

    But nonetheless, I’ve seen Columbus push forward and grow to be better very fast within the last couple of years. I’m not against moving, but it’s good to be a part of a city that wants to be more.

    #475908
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    Had for years the goal of living in a more cosmopolitan, sophisticated, and forward-thinking city, however that’s defined.

    Anymore, don’t have that goal, per se. Though from time to time think, “got to get out of this vanilla, complacent, conformist, unimaginative ‘test-market’ city,”

    I really wish anyone who feels that way would just get up and go. Anyone who still sees Columbus that way has their head up their rear end.

    And just to be gratuitously rude, I find it very hard to imagine you being welcomed in “a more cosmopolitan, sophisticated, and forward-thinking city” –however that’s defined!

    geoyui said:
    And sometimes the “talent” pool is smaller here in Columbus then say other cities.

    I don’t think that’s actually true. In the last year, during the time I’ve been putting together the Invitational, I’ve been continually amazed at the sheer numbers of people doing amazing and creative things in all areas –art, business, activism, etc. The talent pool here isn’t necessarily very organized or visible, perhaps, but it’s definitely deep.

    #475909

    dubdave00
    Participant

    bruinswin said:
    Agree 100%. I’m continually surprised with how so many young Ohio people are stuck on this idea that they need to “buy that house before age 28!” Which is often fueled by parents desperate to keep their adult children from leaving, but the desperation is masked by mantras about “making smart financial choices,” etc. So they get the house (which is like their early retirement), and then they spend the next 30 years enslaved to house payments they can’t get out of. And most of them figure out out by their early 30’s that they need to leave Ohio to move up in their careers. But they usually figure out too late, after the house, the unhappy marriage based on their mid-20’s mentality which changes dramatically by 30, 1-3 children, etc.

    This narrative comes across a little too specific for a broad generalization of late 20 / early 30 somethings in Ohio. That said, I know people who are in that place right now but it’s not necessarily age or lifestyle-specific.

    Everybody asks “what if”. And if you ask it a lot, it can lead to feelings of being stuck.

    I would argue that contentment is less of a feeling and more of a conscious choice one has to make on a daily basis, as one cannot have / do everything.

    That said, contentment is a tough choice in your 20s and 30s because of that nagging voice in your head that worries you’re “settling”. The older you get, the less options you have, and the easier the path seems. Some people are “settling”, others need to decide what matters in life as you can’t have/do everything, and most of us need to stop living in fear of future regret. Good luck figuring that out… It’s called growing up. :-)

    #475910

    I am stuck…need to leave ASAP.

    #475911

    bruinswin said:
    Agree 100%. I’m continually surprised with how so many young Ohio people are stuck on this idea that they need to “buy that house before age 28!” Which is often fueled by parents desperate to keep their adult children from leaving, but the desperation is masked by mantras about “making smart financial choices,” etc. So they get the house (which is like their early retirement), and then they spend the next 30 years enslaved to house payments they can’t get out of. And most of them figure out out by their early 30’s that they need to leave Ohio to move up in their careers. But they usually figure out too late, after the house, the unhappy marriage based on their mid-20’s mentality which changes dramatically by 30, 1-3 children, etc.

    All this surprises me everyday of the week at work. I shake my head when i hear of another person falling victim to this trap.

    #475912

    geoyui
    Participant

    ChrisSunami said:
    I don’t think that’s actually true. In the last year, during the time I’ve been putting together the Invitational, I’ve been continually amazed at the sheer numbers of people doing amazing and creative things in all areas –art, business, activism, etc. The talent pool here isn’t necessarily very organized or visible, perhaps, but it’s definitely deep.

    I agree that this isn’t something that occurs in all causes or organizations, but it can happen. I know an organization that is extremely important, runs a wildly successful, nationally recognized yearly event, but the founder of the org cannot find people to take over for him. The founder is in his 60’s and most of his board is also in their 50’s and have trouble with succession planning. The talent he taps and reaches out to are either stretched to thin in similar orgs or have moved away.

    I would agree that the talent pool is deep, as there are individuals that I know who are content with being a “support” role, the true challenge is getting them to step forward and take on more.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 73 total)

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