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Amazon moving into delivering groceries (CA and expanding to 20 cities)

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Everyday Chit Chat Amazon moving into delivering groceries (CA and expanding to 20 cities)

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 36 total)
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  • #545080
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    buckette13 said:
    Will you be able to buy local ohio products like Snowville, der Dutchman and Jeni’s?

    The current offerings for the cities they’re in are heavy on local products, so I wouldn’t be surprised.

    That said, you can get all 3 of those delivered from Hill’s now.

    #545081

    buckette13
    Member

    Coremodels said:
    The current offerings for the cities they’re in are heavy on local products, so I wouldn’t be surprised.

    That said, you can get all 3 of those delivered from Hill’s now.

    Good to know, I was actually thinking they wouldn’t have that stuff.

    If Amazon is cheap and convenient I definitely can see myself taking advantage of it from time to time.

    #545082

    billbix
    Member

    I think this is inevitable but it is like Edison saying it took him 10,000 ways of learning how not to make a lightbulb to invent one that works. Everyone thought that groceries would be part of the internet revolution of the late 90’s. Then all of those startups imploded and internet grocer WebVan lost $1 billion (yes one billion) dollars. That gave it the dubious distinction of being the biggest dot com flop ever.

    I think Amazon has the experience and the patience to do this right and I think we will be better for having it. It can be a big boon to local products which are fighting for the limited space on shelves of traditional grocery stores. This will be great for Snowville, Krema and Jeni’s and the 1000’s of central ohio products that have not gone to market yet due to costs and logistics. It will be interesting to see where Grocery 2.0 leads us.

    As an aside, I wonder if this will eventually start a trend of evening delivery? I think most people would prefer to have their groceries delivered when they are home from work.

    #545083
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    billbix said:
    I think this is inevitable but it is like Edison saying it took him 10,000 ways of learning how not to make a lightbulb to invent one that works. Everyone thought that groceries would be part of the internet revolution of the late 90’s. Then all of those startups imploded and internet grocer WebVan lost $1 billion (yes one billion) dollars. That gave it the dubious distinction of being the biggest dot com flop ever.

    I think there’s also a factor at play here for customer adoption. Demographics have changed rapidly, and so has the mindset of existing demographics when it comes to online purchasing. More and more people have become comfortable with the idea of purchasing groceries (and everything else) online and having it delivered where in the 90s, the customer base willing to use such services was much smaller.

    #545084

    RhondaH
    Member

    Walker said:
    people have become comfortable with the idea of purchasing groceries (and everything else) online and having it delivered

    +1

    billbix said:
    It can be a big boon to local products which are fighting for the limited space on shelves of traditional grocery stores. This will be great for Snowville, Krema and Jeni’s and the 1000’s of central ohio products that have not gone to market yet due to costs and logistics.

    I wouldn’t have thought of Amazon as part of the ‘buy local’ movement but that makes sense.

    #545085
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    buckette13 said:
    Good to know, I was actually thinking they wouldn’t have that stuff.

    That’s what I liked so much about the Hill’s offering. I did 90% of my shopping in the Hill’s Own and the From Ohio “aisles”.

    #545086

    RhondaH
    Member

    Coremodels said:
    That’s what I liked so much about the Hill’s offering. I did 90% of my shopping in the Hill’s Own and the From Ohio “aisles”.

    I like Hills but I don’t think I would ever do all my shopping there. I love Snowville and some of the specialty items but I also like Apple Jacks and a bunch of other questionable processed foods that I would never pay premium prices for. This is where Amazon can really dominate its market as I assume it will carry the full gamut with prices more in line with what I am used to paying at Kroger.

    I don’t think Hill’s will have to worry though. They are targeting the premium residential/office market downtown and that demographic is usually older and/or has extra $$$ to spend. I see AmazonFresh as appealing greatly to run of the mill Millennials.

    #545087

    susank
    Member

    I agree with RhondaH concerning Hill’s. It is gourmet market with a lot of its own in house prepared foods aimed at a particular segment. Heck, they might want to hock some of their meatloaf on Amazon! :)

    #545088

    leftovers
    Member

    How local is Amazon local? Would you be able to get stuff from Brezel, Resch’s or Nida’s? If it carries over into stuff like the North Market then I can see it being really popular especially with those having really busy and hectic lives and not wanting to have to shop at 3 places. If I had a small shop and could deal with the added capacity Amazon might be a good place to partner with.

    #545089
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    leftovers said:
    How local is Amazon local? Would you be able to get stuff from Brezel, Resch’s or Nida’s? If it carries over into stuff like the North Market then I can see it being really popular especially with those having really busy and hectic lives and not wanting to have to shop at 3 places. If I had a small shop and could deal with the added capacity Amazon might be a good place to partner with.

    From the brief browsing I did a couple months ago (Seattle I thought?) it looked REALLY local, like if North Market offered stuff. This was an example of the “Seattle Spotlight” stores offered:

    Pike Place Fish Market
    La Spiga Restaurant
    Samurai Noodle
    Top Pot Doughnuts
    DeLaurenti Food & Wine
    Trophy Cupcakes
    Pasta & Co.
    World Spice Merchants
    Mayuri Foods
    Oh! Chocolate
    Blue Streak Chocolates
    Tiny’s Organic
    Gretchen’s Shoebox Express
    Eltana Wood-Fired Bagels
    Affordable Kosher
    A La Mode Pies
    Fischer Meats
    Caffé Vita
    Skillet

    P.S. Totally agree on Hill’s, but for a single guy (my age) being able to buy prepared foods that are actually real, often local ingredients is fantastic so I do most of my shopping there.

    #545090

    leftovers
    Member

    Wow, that is really cool. It also means that neat startups don’t have to worry as much about finding hard to get locations like the North Market to get them going. Places that are off the beaten track a bit like Cookie Cravings would probably benefit a lot from Amazon without having to get a high traffic address like a stall in the North Market.

    This could be a really good thing for local food related entrepreneurs.

    #545091
    Liner Notes
    Liner Notes
    Participant

    While I can see how this could be a boon to local producers, I can’t help but think about the potential loss of jobs in the customer service industry. I very rarely use the self check lines at grocery stores, because I still believe that cashier jobs are needed in the work force. Also, I like picking out my own produce.

    #545092

    gramarye
    Participant

    I like to be able to look at produce, meats, and cheeses before I buy them.

    As for Amazon’s margins: Amazon is quite comfortable operating on razor-thin margins and high volume. And its lack of brick and mortar presence means that what qualifies as razor-thin margins for Amazon would be a loss for many brick-and-mortar retailers. Amazon is also readily willing to partner with other businesses large and small via its Fulfilled by Amazon service, offering them e-commerce support (i.e., access to the Amazon retail interface), warehouse space, and more. Amazon gets some money out of it and also valuable retail data, which Amazon wants almost as much as money, if not more.

    Widespread adoption of online grocery shopping would be a fantastic urbanist development, as it would not only make it easier for people in neighborhoods with no grocery store, but it would enable existing grocery stores to hopefully sell off a lot of their land (particularly their surface parking lots) and become either smaller, offering only the goods that many people will still want to see before they buy, or much larger as they plug their own systems into the Amazon distribution network and become part of that ecosystem. Either one would be better than the status quo.

    #545093

    RhondaH
    Member

    Liner Notes said:
    While I can see how this could be a boon to local producers, I can’t help but think about the potential loss of jobs in the customer service industry. I very rarely use the self check lines at grocery stores, because I still believe that cashier jobs are needed in the work force. Also, I like picking out my own produce.

    I’d rather see more local producers (better jobs) than more bottom tier bagger/cashier jobs. I see the Amazon scenario as an opportunity especially for small local businesses.

    I like picking my own produce etc also but I am betting this online thing only works if they keep on top of that. I am sure they realize that factor and I don’t doubt that would possibly be a new local job. I know older people, even some older millennials, have trepidation buying clothes or jewelry online for similar reasons. But once you do it, you realize there is a system if you aren’t satisfied.

    I also think the Amazon model works great from an urbanist perspective.

    #545094

    cbus11
    Member

    Being a little older I am not as quick to jump on the online model (ie I like to browse and pick out my produce). The comments here though seem to have a lot of merit and I think that it will be good for local producers and small businesses that seek to partner with Amazon. I can’t really find fault with it.

    There has been a lot of traditional brick and mortar grocery expansion in the last few years. If nothing else we will have a plethora of options. Those involved in the grocery business are going to have to keep on their toes.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 36 total)

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